TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > Off Topic > Archaeology
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-18-2011, 08:06 AM   #101
RedeemedChild
IndyFan
 
RedeemedChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
So there is nothing he can possess that the Egyptian Criminal Court cannot take away.

You missed out the really good stuff:



Maybe he'll be breaking rocks for archaeology students!

LOL. This is very funny.

I've haven't really be able to watch Zawi Hawass's show Chasing Mummies but what I've seen of it fully impressed me and I'm sorry that the show is coming to an end. It was like Indiana Jones on steroids for real.

BTW here is where a link to a comment by Hawass on the shows ending.
http://www.drhawass.com/blog/chasing...ries-comes-end
RedeemedChild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2011, 10:18 AM   #102
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 961
Haven't read the article, but I saw online that Dr. Hawass is on the current May/June cover of Biblical Archaeology Review.

http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/contents.asp
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2011, 12:13 PM   #103
Rocket Surgeon
Guest
 
Rocket Surgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 8,888
Life imitating Art

What gets me is the caption under the photo...really?!!



'Real Indiana Jones' sacked as keeper of Egypt's heritage

By Richard Spencer, Middle East Correspondent

Quote:
He called himself the real Indiana Jones and keeper of Egypt's heritage, and was an almost permanent presence on any television programme about the country's colourful past.

George Lucas consulted Zahi Hawass before creating the character of Indiana Jones Photo: AP


But Zahi Hawass, the public face of the pyramids, has become the latest casualty of the revolution sweeping the Egyptian government after being sacked as minister of antiquities.

Dr Hawass was head of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities for 10 years, and before that in charge of the Pyramids and Sphinx on the Giza plateau outside Cairo. He staged regular press conferences unveiling new discoveries from the time of the pharaohs.

In honour of his claim that the film producer George Lucas consulted him before creating the character of Indiana Jones, played by Harrison Ford in films like Raiders of the Lost Ark, he was rarely seen without a large fedora hat.

But after being made minister of antiquities in one of Hosni Mubarak's last acts as president, he has been sacked to appease growing hostility from anti-government protesters, not least archaeologists fed up with his style of management.

Social networking sites like Twitter were flooded with inevitable jokes, from "the Curse of the Mummy strikes" to comments such as "Zahi Hawass to no longer appear in every single TV special on Egypt". Some were simpler, saying, "Please take your hat with you."

Dr Hawass was popular among journalists, visitors and for a time Egyptians themselves for his flamboyant style and unchallenged commitment to promote Egypt's treasures and to use them to attract tourists.

He also led populist campaigns to return Egypt's heritage from museums abroad, most notably the Rosetta Stone from the British Museum.

However, local archaeologists accused him of stealing credit for their achievements, and "recycling" discoveries for publicity.

More seriously, as the Egyptian revolution unfolded, his finances, friendship with Mr Mubarak's wife, Suzanne, and management of resources came into question.

He was revealed to receive a regular income from the National Geographic channel, and was put on trial over the contract under which a company which marketed a "souvenir Hawass clothing line", including copies of the trademark hat, was awarded the rights to run the souvenir shop in the National Museum in Cairo.

He claimed that proceeds from the hats went to children's charities, of which Mrs Mubarak was patron.

At one stage, while protesters were flooding Tahrir Square and the road outside the Television Centre, archaeologists were staging their own strike outside the offices of the Antiquities Council.

Matters were made worse when the extent of damage and looting to the poorly guarded museum and other historic sites during the demonstrations became clear.

The prime minister, Essam Sharaf, this weekend bowed to renewed protests by young activists who claim that the interim Supreme Military Council, which is overseeing the country until new elections, is keeping too much power to itself. Mr Sharaf removed half his cabinet, including Dr Hawass, on Sunday afternoon.

It is unlikely that the Egyptian government will drop its campaign for the return of the Rosetta Stone. But the scandals surrounding his removal will remove some of the pressure on the British Museum, as the financial crisis in Greece has over its other controversial exhibit, the Elgin Marbles.

Dr Hawass’s sacking will be mourned by colleagues around the world, many of whom worked with him closely for decades.

John Baines, professor of Egyptology at Oxford University, said: “Over the years he did a lot of good for Egyptian archaeology and in many cases for the Egyptian monuments, but recently he had become very domineering, and an eclipse became increasingly likely.”


Replaced by Professor in Restoration
Quote:
"He was the Mubarak of antiquities," said Nora Shalaby, an activist and archaeologist. "He acted as if he owned Egypt's antiquities, and not that they belonged to the people of Egypt."

And archaeology students and professors blasted him for what they saw as his lack of serious research.

Shalaby said Hawass didn't tolerate criticism. She said most his finds were about self-promotion, with many "rediscoveries" in search of the limelight.

In one of Mubarak's final official acts as president, Hawass' position was elevated to that of a Cabinet minister. After Mubarak's ouster, Hawass submitted his resignation but he was reinstated before finally being removed Sunday.

Hawass was replaced by Abdel-Fattah el-Banna, an associate professor in restoration. He was frequently present in Tahrir Square during the protests.

Last edited by Rocket Surgeon : 07-18-2011 at 12:26 PM.
Rocket Surgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2011, 09:30 AM   #104
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 961
Wow. Last month he's on the cover of Biblical Archaeology Review. This month he's in the job line with the rest of Mubarak's guys.
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2011, 07:27 AM   #105
Rocket Surgeon
Guest
 
Rocket Surgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 8,888
I have the strange feeling he's tucked some money away for a rainy day...
Rocket Surgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2011, 07:46 AM   #106
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
I have the strange feeling he's tucked some money away for a rainy day...

Yeah. By Egyptian standards he must be fabulously wealthy. Certainly getting American rates for all the big tv gigs in a country where the dollar goes about three times as far. Lecture tour honorariums, etc., and he's swimming in loot.

I checked his Facebook page (1200 other people and I are Zahi's closest buddies....). No new posts since July 14. No place to post fresh comments, either, but you can still post to old comments.

Wonder if he'll stay in Egypt, come to the States for a while, or go elsewhere. Must be kind of sketchy for anyone associated with Mubarak. Could be a good idea to tuck tail and lay low in another country, but pride might keep him there.

He's probably already gotten a few dozen emails with offers for university positions, lecture tours, and the like. I'll be curious to see what he does.
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2011, 10:04 AM   #107
Rocket Surgeon
Guest
 
Rocket Surgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 8,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodeknight
I'll be curious to see what he does.
Considering his health and love of the hookah, could he go very far?
Rocket Surgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2011, 10:44 AM   #108
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
Considering his health and love of the hookah, could he go very far?



"It's not the years. It's the...well, it's mainly the hookah. But it's also the mileage."

He's up there in years, but I don't think he does too bad climbing and crawling around the monuments. That's certainly tougher than going on a worldwide lecture tour.

Many profs working summers in Egypt are in a lot worse shape.

Last edited by Goodeknight : 07-20-2011 at 10:50 AM.
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2011, 11:17 AM   #109
Rocket Surgeon
Guest
 
Rocket Surgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 8,888
You had to do it! How about something more fitting, like Mola Ram?
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodeknight
"It's not the years. It's the...well, it's mainly the hookah. But it's also the mileage."

He's up there in years, but I don't think he does too bad climbing and crawling around the monuments. That's certainly tougher than going on a worldwide lecture tour.

Many profs working summers in Egypt are in a lot worse shape.

It should prove interesting to be sure...
Rocket Surgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 03:24 PM   #110
Gabeed
IndyFan
 
Gabeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
You had to do it! How about something more fitting, like Mola Ram?

Aw man. He does kinda look a bit like Mola Ram, and the both of them can talk about how the British stole their precious relics from their respective peoples.
Gabeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2012, 11:02 AM   #111
China Jim
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hurricane WV
Posts: 89
Zahi Update

Wanted to check and see what had happened to Dr Hawass since my AIA magazine has not ran any info update on him. does the group think that the non-egyptian teachers at the various universities will be safe.Many of the folks involved in the work that Dr Hawass was involved in were either non- muslim ie egyptian or not devout at all I draw as example and its been a bit I believe her name is Dr Selim beautiful dark tressed british accented archaeologist I think Montana Smith may know who I am talking about.
China Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2012, 03:49 AM   #112
Le Saboteur
IndyFan
 
Le Saboteur's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: The Yay Area
Posts: 1,472
Quote:
Originally Posted by China Jim
...does the group think that the non-egyptian teachers at the various universities will be safe...

Stirring, stirring, stirring.

To answer your initial question, as couched in panicky editorializing as it is, Dr. Hawass doesn't appear to be up to much. He received an award from the Cairo Chapter of the Lions Club in March, and is expected to be facing new charges according to Al-Arham. The paper is reporting that Dr. Hawass...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Al-Arham
...admitted in a television talk show that he had a 17 million dollar deal with the American Geographical Society with regard to a Tutankhamun exhibition to raise donations for Suzanne Mubarak's association, wife of former president Hosni Mubarak. Suzanne Mubarak's association was a private association not a state body, and as such Hawass was not legally allowed to use his position as a state minister to raise funds for it.

I expect that they flubbed the translation and mean the National Geographic Society. Any "charges" I would take with a hu-uge grain of salt. It sounds like they're related to the traveling Tutankhamen exhibit that he helped arrange with the National Geographic Society.

Full article is viewable here.
Le Saboteur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2012, 11:32 AM   #113
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 961
Quote:
Originally Posted by China Jim
does the group think that the non-egyptian teachers at the various universities will be safe.

I haven't heard of any big faculty changes (like a mass exodus of foreign or non-Muslim profs) from my alma mater, the American University in Cairo. So it seems they're pretty safe. And, more telling, I believe they are still accepting study abroad students. They do have lots of safety guidelines for them, though. AUC's old campus (still in use) is right on Tahrir Square.
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2012, 11:42 AM   #114
China Jim
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hurricane WV
Posts: 89
Good to hear Goodknight

Thanks for the info Goodknight with little to no info coming out concerning our interest I had little to draw from but since I saw all those Prof. doing digs and the majority were not Arabic on the National Geo and History channel specials I was just concerned Zahi is ethnocentric but I dont believe he is a practicing Muslim so he may be persona non grata with the new ruling party but maybe they will leave are brothers and sisters in archaeology and history alone and we can work with out worrying about getting our heads shot off.
China Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 11:20 AM   #115
Archaeos
IndyFan
 
Archaeos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Really Not The British Museum
Posts: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by China Jim
Wanted to check and see what had happened to Dr Hawass since my AIA magazine has not ran any info update on him. does the group think that the non-egyptian teachers at the various universities will be safe.Many of the folks involved in the work that Dr Hawass was involved in were either non- muslim ie egyptian or not devout at all I draw as example and its been a bit I believe her name is Dr Selim beautiful dark tressed british accented archaeologist I think Montana Smith may know who I am talking about.

I might be mistaken, but do you mean Dr Salima Ikram, the Pakistani-born (and Muslim) Egyptologist? She is still Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo, doing well, and working on all her projects, including AMP and NKOS. By the way, there was a nice interview with her in the magazine Minerva, January/February 2012. Check it out.

This year's excavation season went ahead without many extraordinary difficulties, so the probable Islamisation of Egypt's government and state hasn't produced insurmountable problems that would hinder archaeological research, yet.

In fact, Zahi's departure as Secretary General of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities, and then notoriously as 1st Minister of Antiquities, allowed lots of good people at the SCA to come forward and fill his shoes. Many people would say that this was long overdue. What looks certain is that his "retirement" this time is quite definite.
Archaeos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 12:49 PM   #116
China Jim
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hurricane WV
Posts: 89
Zahi Hawass update

Archaeos,
Thank you for the update I wasn't over reacting after seeing all the trouble in Egypt and how much power the Muslim Brotherhood was starting to weild that they may push a ethnocentric mentality and throw out all foreigners or limit what they can do. I figure I will get a little grief on my next statement but after hearing Glenn Becks speech about the brotherhood and double checking his statements I surmised I had grounds to be concerned> But once again thanks for the update and contact me if you need any info on ancient or classical history.
China Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 01:03 PM   #117
Archaeos
IndyFan
 
Archaeos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Really Not The British Museum
Posts: 244
There are grounds to be concerned re. Egypt (and Libya, Leptis Magna damage ), but let's say it's Yellow Alert, and not Red Alert.

Quote:
Originally Posted by China Jim
Archaeos,
But once again thanks for the update and contact me if you need any info on ancient or classical history.

I will!
Archaeos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2012, 10:36 PM   #118
foreverwingnut
IndyFan
 
foreverwingnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 123
I've seen Zahi in so many specials that I've lost count. At first I really liked and respected him, but by the time he got his own series, "Chasing Mummies", I began to see the real Zahi and lost much of my respect of him. His power had become too great before he was demoted, once having authority that prevailed even over Alexandrian discovery. Cleopatra's kingdom of Alexandria was really a kingdom unto itself, so it's difficult for me to understand how Zahi managed to garner complete autonomy in Alexandria in the interest of Egyptian authority. He is a glory hound and prefered the limelight to be on himself rather than the amazing discoveries. Case in point: he didn't like that a pylon from the waters of Alexandria was nearly lost when it slipped because camera crews were there to capture his humility. He didn't like being made to look bad in front of the press. For Zahi to demand that all Egyptian antiquities be returned to Egypt is quite petty when you consider how much funding Egypt has obtained from other countries. How can Zahi assume that no other nationalities have the right to cherish Egyptian antiquity when it was his own countrymen who raided the Cairo museum last year and destroyed much of their own history? The Middle East is the Cradle of Civilization from which we all sprang, so it's OUR history, not just a select few. I respect his devotion to archeology, but I can't respect his power-high.
foreverwingnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 06:02 AM   #119
Archaeos
IndyFan
 
Archaeos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Really Not The British Museum
Posts: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
His power had become too great before he was demoted, once having authority that prevailed even over Alexandrian discovery. Cleopatra's kingdom of Alexandria was really a kingdom unto itself, so it's difficult for me to understand how Zahi managed to garner complete autonomy in Alexandria in the interest of Egyptian authority.

I am terribly sorry, but I don't fully understand what you mean by that. Would you care to elaborate? Do you mean that the SCA is only responsible for stuff up until 332/1 BC, leaving the Ptolemaic Dynasty out?
Archaeos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2012, 06:48 AM   #120
foreverwingnut
IndyFan
 
foreverwingnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 123
I'm sorrry if I caused confusion, but you are on to my meaning. Alexandria was under the rule of the Ptolemaic Dynasty throughout the Hellenistic period. They even refused to speak Egyptian, hence the creation of the Rosetta Stone as a means to translate. Alexandria had become a marriage of Greek, Roman and Egyptian cultures, making it a kingdom unto itself. Therefore, Egypt (Zahi) should have little or no authority over Alexandrian antiquity. It would have been certainly wise to have asked for Zahi's expert advice in the recovery and care of Alexandrian relics, but giving him the free-reigns to lord over Alexandrian discovery in the name of the Egyptian government was misplaced and unnecessary in my opinion. Alexandria possesses many capable and competent archeologists to oversee their own affairs. Alexandria's discoveries belong to their own people, not Egypt. And while the pylon that I mentioned will be displayed in Alexandria, there is little doubt that Zahi would have eventually demanded that it and other Cleopatra-age discoveries be sent to Cairo.
foreverwingnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2012, 02:30 PM   #121
Archaeos
IndyFan
 
Archaeos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Really Not The British Museum
Posts: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
I'm sorrry if I caused confusion, but you are on to my meaning.

I think so, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
Alexandria was under the rule of the Ptolemaic Dynasty throughout the Hellenistic period. They even refused to speak Egyptian, hence the creation of the Rosetta Stone as a means to translate. Alexandria had become a marriage of Greek, Roman and Egyptian cultures, making it a kingdom unto itself. Therefore, Egypt (Zahi) should have little or no authority over Alexandrian antiquity. It would have been certainly wise to have asked for Zahi's expert advice in the recovery and care of Alexandrian relics, but giving him the free-reigns to lord over Alexandrian discovery in the name of the Egyptian government was misplaced and unnecessary in my opinion.


You seem to take a very ethnicity-based or regional/nationality-based approach to who is allowed to cater for what antiquities in what place, effectively saying that only people with some, well, effectively (imagined) "blood-line" connection should care and research for antiquities found there: because Alexandria was a cosmopolis for a few centuries, developing under Hellenistic, Roman influences in addition to be located in Egypt, one should be... well... what? Ask the Greek or Turkish or Italian or Saudi government agencies to exclusively conduct archaeological work in Alexandria?
Or do you mean that Zahi as an egyptologist/archaeologist should not be involved with Alexandria because this would be the expert realm of Classical archaeolgists?

I think one should not forget that Zahi Hawass was the Secretary General of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities since 2002. The Supreme Council of Antiquities is responsible for all antiquities and related research within the borders of the Arab Republic of Egypt.
This includes all Dynastic Kingdoms and Periods of Ancient Egypt. And while most popular broadcastings and interests in Ancient Egypt focus on the New Kingdom (and then mostly on the mere 3 centuries of the 18th and 19th Dynasty out of that), the SCA's responsibility includes all the other 6000 years of human activity in Egypt as well!
This includes Persian Egypt (both Achaemenid Egypt and the Sassanid/Arab Muslim Conquest), the Ptolemaic Dynasty of the Graeco-Roman Period, and also Byzantine/Coptic-Christian/Islamic eras.
Zahi as Secretary General was responsible for the administration of this organisation. While many academics levy appropriate criticism on him for expanding his responsibilities beyond what would be ethically accepted in academia or other national organisations of a similar kind, I think he being responsible for Alexandria, "...to lord over Alexandrian discovery in the name of the Egyptian government...", is exactly what his job description is all about.

In fact, many think that the millennia from Byzantine to Arab Muslim Egypt are those eras most neglected by Zahi and the SCA. And I think this might change in the next few years under a new political (Muslim) government.

Or are you referring specifically to an incident when he was still Chief Inspector or later Director of the Giza Pyramid Plateau? In that case, note: just because he presents something on TV doesn't mean that he is actually calling the shots on excavations outside of the Giza area.


Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
Alexandria possesses many capable and competent archeologists to oversee their own affairs.

Sure, and I can reassure you that excavation projects in Hellenic or Hellenistic sites such as Naukratis or Hierakonpolis are done by a mixed team of experts from all over the world. It's not that Alexandria is some Greek territory occupied by the hostile Egyptians... unless I missed something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
Alexandria's discoveries belong to their own people, not Egypt.

I might have missed something... Again, it's not that Alexandria is some Greek territory occupied by the hostile Egyptians... and it has a pretty good museum landscape... for Egypt.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
And while the pylon that I mentioned will be displayed in Alexandria, there is little doubt that Zahi would have eventually demanded that it and other Cleopatra-age discoveries be sent to Cairo.

I am not a follower of Zahi, but I think one should level critique against him fairly (which does not mean mildly where it would not be inappropriate to be harsh). You will find that museums in Egypt have specific topics and also regional rooting, so it's not that everything and anything ends up in Cairo because Zahi's "ego couldn't accept anything else", as you imply.
One also has to bear in mind that some museums have better equipment, displaying technology, or more suitable capacity and technology to conduct specific research on a newly-found object. Hence why sometimes one museum makes more sense as 'resting place' than another.

Archaeos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2012, 04:44 PM   #122
foreverwingnut
IndyFan
 
foreverwingnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 123
I understand you, Archaeos, and you bring up very valid points, but my issue is with Zahi's ego and broad authority, not with politics or skin-color. As I said earlier, I really liked Zahi at first, but as the years went by, he became increasingly arrogant and down-right tyrannical. He's been called "Pharoah" and he clearly loved the title. He seemed to become more concerened with his own image than academia. I'll give you another example: During "Chasing Mummies", Dr. Allen Morton needed a simple signature from Zahi on a work order. Zahi was expecting the work order, but refused to sign it until he'd finished mingling with some unexpected tourists. He got angry with Morton for doing his job and ordered him to stand in a corner until Zahi had finished taking catering to his fans. "Stand in the corner" is something an adult tells a child who misbehaves, it's not something a professional tells a colleague who is just doing his job. When signing autographs takes precedence over signing important work orders, then clearly his ego needed a reality check. His treatment of Morton was reflective of his lack of respect for other archeologists in general, which was my issue with his authority over Alexandrian antiquity. He just doesn't respect other experts in his field. Without question, Zahi is the world's most accomplished archeologist, but power often corrupts great people.
foreverwingnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2012, 06:47 PM   #123
Archaeos
IndyFan
 
Archaeos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Really Not The British Museum
Posts: 244
Right, okay, that's fair enough, and I think you would find few people in the profession of archaeology to disagree with you - from what I hear and read.

Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
Without question, Zahi is the world's most accomplished archeologist.

I think you would find more than a few people in the profession of archaeology to politely or vehemently disagree with that .
What would be fairer to say is that he is the most recognisable mainstream face of archaeology today (after Indiana Jones ).
Archaeos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2012, 08:03 AM   #124
foreverwingnut
IndyFan
 
foreverwingnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 123
It's difficult to articulate when trying to praise and belittle a man in the same breath, but I'm glad we reached an understanding. Thanks, Archaeos. I will have to explain my use of the phrase, "most accomplished". I agree with you that there are certainly other archeologists that have more impressive and diverse areas of expertise, such as David Cheatham. But I believe Zahi to be the most accomplished in terms of authority, discovery, and- as you pointed out- recognition. I hate to bash the man any more without sounding like a complete jerk, but I have to mention one more item about his ego that I think everyone, whether you love him or hate him, can agree. His claims on discoveries were the product of his authority- his mandate that no one should enter a newly found tomb before him, giving him full credit for the find. Having said that, I'd like to change direction and pose a question, Archaeos: Is there an archeologist that you would describe as being a real-life Indiana Jones? If I could name a real-life Indiana Jones, it would be David Cheatham. He's a lady-killer, a teacher, a gentleman, and a darn-fine archeologist.
foreverwingnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2012, 08:54 AM   #125
Archaeos
IndyFan
 
Archaeos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Really Not The British Museum
Posts: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
His claims on discoveries were the product of his authority

I agree with that statement

Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverwingnut
Having said that, I'd like to change direction and pose a question, Archaeos: Is there an archeologist that you would describe as being a real-life Indiana Jones? If I could name a real-life Indiana Jones, it would be David Cheatham. He's a lady-killer, a teacher, a gentleman, and a darn-fine archeologist.

Cheatham? Good call, foreverwingnut!

To be honest, thinking about a real-life Indy today... - ...I can't think of any man... and that might be good for science and women ( ) ... Maybe John Coleman Darnell?
(something for Stoo, fashion-wise... here, here and here)

When thinking about women who are "...teachers, ladies, darn-fine scholars and win men over with their attractiveness and inspire women as role-models..." (to amend your quote a bit), the names of Kara Cooney, Bettany Hughes, Colleen Manassa, Efrosyni Boutsikas, and the earlier-mentioned Salima Ikram come to my mind.

But this is just an off-hand-out-of-my-mind list, with no claim for completion or correctness - I think none would describe themselves as a "real-life" Indiana Jones/Jane. But I also think it's fair to say that archaeology has a much better influx of women nowadays then ever before - with a hint of underlying or (un)conscious inspiration from the Fedora-wearer. Check out this wonderful little thread on a German Indiana Jones board that exemplifies that - just to keep that aspect within the Indy community .

I think Margaret Maitland deserves a plug here, as her blog "Eloquent Peasant" is really excellent. She also recently spoke at Thinking Digital 2012 talking as "Egyptologist 2.0".
Check it out...

Last edited by Archaeos : 06-04-2012 at 09:00 AM.
Archaeos is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:44 AM.