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Old 06-09-2006, 02:07 PM   #1
roundshort
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Which Wine to whine about . . .

From reading this forum, it seems that Raven users come from and travel all over the place. I know a lot of Raveners are underage and probably can not drink (at least by US rules), but still I haev to ask

What are your favorite wines?

Crisp New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs
Heavy spicy Aussie Shiraz?
Big and Bold California Cabernet Sauvignon?
Refreashing Chablis?
Oaky and cedery Bordeaux?
Tangy Rioja?
Vegital Austian Gruner?
Yummy wine form a box and a spout?
Screw cap Night Train or Mad Dog 20/20
E&J wine coolers?

Let me know!
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Old 06-09-2006, 02:13 PM   #2
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What??? No mention of Boone's???
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Old 06-09-2006, 02:22 PM   #3
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if Night Train and Mad Dog 20/20 doesn't fit, the farm is always there!
Personnaly I go for the Kiwi/strawberry
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Old 06-09-2006, 02:26 PM   #4
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I prefer Country Kwencher... the name says it all!
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Old 06-09-2006, 03:57 PM   #5
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There's a right time and place for every wine
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Old 06-10-2006, 12:32 PM   #6
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Rioja is nice - one of the few reds I like. On a warm summer's day, a rose like White Zinfandel or Grenache is good.
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Old 06-10-2006, 02:55 PM   #7
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A red Brouilly is always nice with meat. And lets say Sauternes for desert with foie gras.
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Old 06-10-2006, 05:36 PM   #8
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I enjoy drinking Stanley's cabernet sauvignon wine. I used to live near Barossa Valley in Australia which has some of the best wines in the world, and they definitely have some of the nicest wines.

Personally, I'm more of a white wine drinker but I drink red wine as it's apparently more beneficial for your health. I love a smooth fruity wine, but can't think of any names off the top of my head at the moment.
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Old 06-10-2006, 10:18 PM   #9
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White Burgundy is quite nice... I can't remember what the label was called though that makes that white wine. I had it for Christmas with the family. As a gal of Italian descent, it isn't unusual to have a little bit of wine every so often while growing up.
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Old 06-11-2006, 11:16 AM   #10
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Where to start?

I do have an affinity for the wines from the Willamette Valley in Oregon, not because they are amazing, but because I have shared them with the best of company on the best occasions. Particularly the following:

Griffin Creek 2000 Cabernet Franc and 1999 Chardonnay. (not truly from Willamette, but enjoyed at their winery.)

Thanatosis enjoys the Pinot Gris varietal but we are looking to find a stapel besides Bella Sera, which is her favorite.

Likewise, on our honeymoon we sampled the fine wines of Texas. Maybe a better word would be: unconventional. We had to buy a case, not because we belive them to be good, but the have a special memory attached.

Thanatosis has a hard time with sulfites, so wine aged in oak is reserved only for me. I have given her an assignment to try to find a sampling of Vigonier of her liking. The last thing we want to be is a trendy Chard, or Noir drinker.
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Old 06-11-2006, 12:08 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pale Horse
Likewise, on our honeymoon we sampled the fine wines of Texas.

West Texas? Did you happen to swing through Marfa?
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Old 06-12-2006, 08:17 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Brody
West Texas? Did you happen to swing through Marfa?
Not to interrupt, but this question wouldn't be about this fine establishment would it?

Or is it about the lights?
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Old 06-12-2006, 10:24 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet Indy
White Burgundy is quite nice... I can't remember what the label was called though that makes that white wine. I had it for Christmas with the family. As a gal of Italian descent, it isn't unusual to have a little bit of wine every so often while growing up.

A very healthy way to live!

I love Burgundy, period. I used to work harvest in Beaune. I love Clos St. Jean In Chassagne. Chablis will always be my favorite chardonnay, but there are a few North Coast Chards I like. There is too much oak influence in some of the newer flashier producers (Giriden) and their Beaune Whites. Volnay will always have a special place in my heart, some of the most under rated reds in the Cote d Or.

German Riesling has to be my go to wine. The Rheingau has the most complex and sublime wine, from youth to over 25 to 30 years in bottle (I am not a fan of overaged wine, a HUGE rookie mistake, older = better.)
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Old 06-12-2006, 06:42 PM   #14
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Well, winemaking is in the family. My Nonno's hobby was to make wine and he did right up til the day he died. When I was little and we visited him, I used to help crush the grapes. My step-grandfather is also Italian and mostly makes gropa. Personally, I don't like the stuff. It's kinda a grape version of ouzo.
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Old 06-12-2006, 06:50 PM   #15
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Wow, RS, I am surprised that you would lean toward French wines, (sorry vaxer) considering the Judgment of Paris, recently. I thought you would lean more to the wines of your northern region. I have to confess I know very little about wines abroad, though I always wind up with a fine Italian dessert wine more often then not. My approach is to start local, then work you way out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Brody
West Texas? Did you happen to swing through Marfa?

Not really swing through, more like fly over. We were pretty much holed up in our honeymoon suite,

and only made it to the heart of San Antonio once, and one day trip in the rental car to Greune for the wine tasting of Texas.
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Old 06-12-2006, 06:57 PM   #16
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It happens, I used to fight it! The problem is, while studing to become a sommelier, you will litterly taste thousands and thousands of wines. The wines with bigger bolder flavors, like Australian, North Coast California, Bordeaux, Tuscan wines, Some Spanish wines, are the easiest to identify and like. As your palate becomes more focused, you start to notice the lighter flavors in wine, and begine to more to wines that are a bit leaner, but show of the region, German Riesling, Burgundy, Northern Italy, Portugal, etc. . .because they do not assult your palate as much.

So while I still love my nice big Napa Cab's, and huge oaky bordeaux, when it coems to food and wine matching I tend for lighter flavors.

I guess, I like wines that are well made period, no matter where they are from. The worst answer is, "what wine is your favorite", the answer is usually, "What was the last great wine I had . . ."
It changes daily.

I had a great California sparkling wine, the J. Schram, that was pretty awesome!
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Old 06-13-2006, 03:28 AM   #17
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I don't really like wine. I tend to go for hard liquor.
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Old 06-13-2006, 08:18 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paden
Not to interrupt, but this question wouldn't be about this fine establishment would it?

I've been there and a fine establishment it is. But the whole reason why Marfa has an art scene is primarily because of The Chinati Foundation; Donalds Judd's contribution to minimalism. In addition to art, Marfa intersects with one of my other interests, film. Marfa is a cool place.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pale Horse
Wow, RS, I am surprised that you would lean toward French wines. . .

Maybe French Women had some effect on his thinking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pale Horse
Not really swing through, more like fly over. We were pretty much holed up in our honeymoon suite,

and only made it to the heart of San Antonio once, and one day trip in the rental car to Greune for the wine tasting of Texas.

I'm jealous. San Antonio is one town in Texas that I have not made it to. Hopefully you didn't try to urinate on the Alamo. [Was that Billy Idol or Ozzy that did that? Or am I just crazy.]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magda
I don't really like wine. I tend to go for hard liquor.

But the liquour can be pretty damn fattening.
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Old 06-13-2006, 08:53 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Brody
I'm jealous. San Antonio is one town in Texas that I have not made it to. Hopefully you didn't try to urinate on the Alamo. [Was that Billy Idol or Ozzy that did that? Or am I just crazy.]
It was Osbourne. February of '82. While drunk and wearing a dress, so the story goes. Over twenty years later, there are still some in this neck of the woods that want him dead for that one.
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Old 06-13-2006, 09:21 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paden
It was Osbourne. February of '82. While drunk and wearing a dress, so the story goes. Over twenty years later, there are still some in this neck of the woods that want him dead for that one.

I spend too much time in Texas, and well, lets just say not the most open minded of states!
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Old 06-13-2006, 10:45 AM   #21
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Hey roundshort, is this actualy you?
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Old 06-13-2006, 10:55 AM   #22
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just a pic from an old series of books
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Old 06-14-2006, 03:10 AM   #23
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Quote:
But the liquour can be pretty damn fattening.

And? It's not like I'm a hardcore alcoholic like some other Poles who lurk on street corners and drink bottle after bottle of liquor. LOL
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Old 06-19-2006, 02:52 AM   #24
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While in Budapest this past week, I had the chance to taste eight different Hungarian wines in a Budafok winery. Most of the wines were delicious, with the exception of a couple.

http://www.licspince.hu
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Old 06-19-2006, 04:29 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magda
While in Budapest this past week, I had the chance to taste eight different Hungarian wines in a Budafok winery. Most of the wines were delicious, with the exception of a couple.

Yeah, once you get to eight bottle they kinda loose their flavour.
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