TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > Beyond the Films > Indy Literature
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-07-2008, 10:31 PM   #151
Indy 18
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 46
I'm reading The Sky Pirates right now and it's fairly good.





"Snakes,why did it have to be snakes"
Indy 18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 12:08 AM   #152
ReggieSnake
IndyFan
 
ReggieSnake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 519
I've only read Secret of the Sphinx by Max McCoy, and I liked it. Like many books of this sort, though, the beginning was much better than the end, IMO.
ReggieSnake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 02:09 AM   #153
tupogirl
IndyFan
 
tupogirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agent Spalko
Anybody read the Adventure series books? I have the first one. They remind me of the Choose Your Own Adventure books I read as a kid. You turn to the page you decide where the story should go. I know they are for kids but kinda fun.


I own one that I picked up at the thrift store for 15 cents. I've only had it a few months, still haven't read it. *I have piles of books to read!* I thought it would be fun for my kids to read it. I'll have to pull it out for next week's episode of 'but moooooooom, I don't knooooow whhhhhatttt tooooo read for homework'. Oh child of mine, I do not deny you books!
tupogirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 03:41 AM   #154
TalonCard
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 151
It's been a long time since I read the two Indy novels I have, Indiana Jones and the Interior World, and Indiana Jones and the Genesis Deluge (both by MacGregor) and I didn't really like them. The dialogue seemed forced, the endings were always inconclusive, and Indy spends way too much time thinking about stuff. I didn't really get that "I'm making this up as I go" feeling that Indiana Jones is all about. I also wanted to either see some references to the YIJC (which I loved) or a different take on the younger character and time period; something more like the films. Instead, from what I remember, we got just as many historical figures and issues popping up but no actual continuity with the series.

That said, there were some interesting ideas in the novels. I liked the idea of Indy going after Noah's ark. (As a small child, I had often thought that Indiana Jones went after Noah's ark; it being the only ark I knew of at the time. Imagine my dissapointment... ) The imagining of the Interior World legend as a kind of inverted alternate universe/state of mind rather than a simple, literal, obvious location was also a cool concept. They just weren't executed that well.

Now, I am looking forward to reading some of the other novels. I've got my eye on Dinosaur Eggs and the Hollow Earth, both of which look pretty exciting.

TC

Last edited by TalonCard : 05-08-2008 at 03:47 AM.
TalonCard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 12:57 PM   #155
Crack that whip
IndyFan
 
Crack that whip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Stone Mountain, GA
Posts: 1,723
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalonCard
It's been a long time since I read the two Indy novels I have, Indiana Jones and the Interior World, and Indiana Jones and the Genesis Deluge (both by MacGregor) and I didn't really like them. The dialogue seemed forced, the endings were always inconclusive, and Indy spends way too much time thinking about stuff. I didn't really get that "I'm making this up as I go" feeling that Indiana Jones is all about. I also wanted to either see some references to the YIJC (which I loved) or a different take on the younger character and time period; something more like the films. Instead, from what I remember, we got just as many historical figures and issues popping up but no actual continuity with the series.

That said, there were some interesting ideas in the novels. I liked the idea of Indy going after Noah's ark. (As a small child, I had often thought that Indiana Jones went after Noah's ark; it being the only ark I knew of at the time. Imagine my dissapointment... ) The imagining of the Interior World legend as a kind of inverted alternate universe/state of mind rather than a simple, literal, obvious location was also a cool concept. They just weren't executed that well.

Please note the books aren't as episodic as the movies, but are more interconnected (I'm a bit mystified at your "no actual continuity within the series" comment, actually), with continuing narrative threads (at least within each author's own set of books). Ideally, you wouldn't start with Genesis Deluge or Interior World, but would instead begin with Peril at Delphi and read through the series in sequence. I don't know if that would have changed things enough for you to have better enjoyed the two books you read, but it might be worth considering.
Crack that whip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2008, 01:33 AM   #156
TalonCard
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crack that whip
Please note the books aren't as episodic as the movies, but are more interconnected (I'm a bit mystified at your "no actual continuity within the series" comment, actually), with continuing narrative threads (at least within each author's own set of books). Ideally, you wouldn't start with Genesis Deluge or Interior World, but would instead begin with Peril at Delphi and read through the series in sequence. I don't know if that would have changed things enough for you to have better enjoyed the two books you read, but it might be worth considering.

What I meant there was that the novels had no continuity with the YIJC TV series; not that there was no continuity within the novel series themselves. And yet the novels I read cover some similar ground (Indy meets Al Capone, flashback to younger Indy with Corey Carrier-style antics) but have no relation to the events in the show.

Admittedly, tying the two together would have been difficult, seeing as how both the novels and the television show would have been produced at about the same time. Still, Lucas did work out a detailed timeline for Young Indy, so I think some of this could have been avoided.

I do agree that ideally I wouldn't have started with the two books that I did...however, this was 2005 and Indy books were hard to find! I was working at Disney World at the time, and, remembering that the Indy gift shop at the Disney*MGM Studios park had many Indiana Jones books, I raced there just before I left for Texas to pick up as many as I could. (A 50% discount is a wonderful thing to behold!) Unfortunately, while the store had scads of Indy books...the only two titles they had were Genesis and World. Oh well.

The funny thing is that I went back there early this year the only Indy books they had were a few copies of Interior World that had been there two years ago...

TC
TalonCard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2008, 04:51 PM   #157
Lao_Che
IndyFan
 
Lao_Che's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalonCard
Admittedly, tying the two together would have been difficult, seeing as how both the novels and the television show would have been produced at about the same time. Still, Lucas did work out a detailed timeline for Young Indy, so I think some of this could have been avoided.

Lucasfilm just didn't seem to be bother with much of an overall continuity for whatever reason.

On the one hand you have the Young Indiana Jones books moving from a River Phoenix potrayal to tie in with the TV series (like Indy and Miss Seymour on the Titanic) but then you have Max McCoy telling this website that he wasn't doing a Spear of Destiny novel plot because Dark Horse was doing a comic, but then he writes about about the Philosopher's Stone which also shows up in a Dark Horse comic.
Lao_Che is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2008, 11:41 PM   #158
TalonCard
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 151
I never bothered to check; do the Young Indy books actually predate the show, as a tie-in to Last Crusade?

TC
TalonCard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 03:19 AM   #159
metalinvader
IndyFan
 
metalinvader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Orellana's Cradle
Posts: 2,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalonCard
I never bothered to check; do the Young Indy books actually predate the show, as a tie-in to Last Crusade?

TC

I'm to lazy to check mine but I think the books were published in '91.
metalinvader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 10:51 AM   #160
Junior Jones
IndyFan
 
Junior Jones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Michigan
Posts: 774
The books were originally published as a follow up to River Phoenix's portrayal in Last Crusade. I think there were about eight before the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles premiered. So the earlier books only reference the movies (Indy's friend Herman) and the later ones occasionally reference the TV series (including Titanic Adventure with Miss Seymour.
Junior Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2008, 05:40 PM   #161
YouNeverKnow
IndyFan
 
YouNeverKnow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Glenview, IL
Posts: 279
Okay so basically the advice is to read all but Interior World which gets too goofy and the Caidin ones because they're lame? Or should I just hunker down and get the set featured on the Official Indy Shop? I'm trying to make my own decision here but the polarizing reviews are really making me unsure.
YouNeverKnow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2008, 06:20 PM   #162
Attila the Professor
Moderator
 
Attila the Professor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 6,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by YouNeverKnow
Okay so basically the advice is to read all but Interior World which gets too goofy and the Caidin ones because they're lame? Or should I just hunker down and get the set featured on the Official Indy Shop? I'm trying to make my own decision here but the polarizing reviews are really making me unsure.

I'd read all of them. They probably take, what, like 3 hours per book? There's stuff that's carried over, and if you only omit three of twelve, why omit any at all? Especially don't skip the Interior World, because there's some payoffs in it from the previous five MacGregor's. And Caidin's character isn't the worst; there's some cool stuff in there.
Attila the Professor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2008, 02:00 AM   #163
TalonCard
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 151
And while I personally didn't like Interior World, it did have some very interesting ideas and I was glad I'd read it.

TC
TalonCard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2008, 10:01 PM   #164
Perhilion
IndyFan
 
Perhilion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 719
What Is The Best 90's Indy Novel?

Now that most of the novels are being re-released, I want to catch up on some of them, but which ones would you recommend? Which feel the most "Indy"?
Perhilion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 11:34 AM   #165
Wiwi Kalawi
IndyFan
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perhilion
Now that most of the novels are being re-released, I want to catch up on some of them, but which ones would you recommend? Which feel the most "Indy"?

I recently re-read all of the Indy books last year, but I'd have to say the best ones were by Max McCoy. The Philosopher's Stone in particular had a lot of "Raiders" moments with him crawling around a lost city in Central America after an idol, and movie-villain like Nazis and so forth. McCoy's books are great for fast, entertaining reads.
Wiwi Kalawi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 12:14 PM   #166
DetectiveFork
IndyFan
 
DetectiveFork's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 230
I've only read "Genesis Deluge," but thought it was excellent.
DetectiveFork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 01:45 PM   #167
Attila the Professor
Moderator
 
Attila the Professor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 6,408
Truthfully, they all have some merits, and many refer to others...they're such quick reads, and so cheap, I'd consider going for all 12. The best, though, is probably Hollow Earth, by McCoy. MacGregor's characterization is quite good though, and Caidin does nice ensemble work.
Attila the Professor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 02:03 PM   #168
ValenciaGrail
IndyFan
 
ValenciaGrail's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Truthfully, they all have some merits, and many refer to others...they're such quick reads, and so cheap, I'd consider going for all 12. The best, though, is probably Hollow Earth, by McCoy. MacGregor's characterization is quite good though, and Caidin does nice ensemble work.

I agree with Atilla here - There is a chronological order to all twleve, and you get a good deal on continuity across books. The exact order is specified in other threads, but the sequence starts with Peril at Delphi and ends with Secret of the Sphinx.

Each can be enjoyed on its own merits, but characters are reintroduced and situations from previous books are referenced...including spoilers from previous books in some cases. This makes certain plot elements seem like sloppy story telling if you don't have the context from the previous "episodes".

I know this because I read them all mostly out of order, getting them as I could get hands on them. Certain things did not make sense until after the fact, when I read the previous book.

The Wall Marts in my area have them for $4.99 at the moment.

Belloq makes a couple of cameo appearances, as does Sallah, and Brody is involved as well. There is even a Crystal Skull Maguffin (not the same one as in KOTCS) in the four McCoy novels.

The weak sisters in the series are, in my opinion, the two Caidin novels. Sky Pirates was a aircraft technical manual cluttered with ocassional plot elements. It wasn't a bad read, actaully, but for this: I pretended that the main character was not Indiana Jones. There was very little archaeology or archaeological maguffins, and Indy was way too much of a Bond / Maguyver mash-up. It was a decent spy novel, but the protagonist had nothing in common with IJ other than the name.

But - all 12 are worth reading. The McCoy and Macgregor sequences read just like Indy movies that were never filmed.
ValenciaGrail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 03:25 PM   #169
|ZiR|
IndyFan
 
|ZiR|'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Mexico / NYC
Posts: 1,226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ValenciaGrail
The weak sisters in the series are, in my opinion, the two Caidin novels. Sky Pirates was a aircraft technical manual cluttered with ocassional plot elements. It wasn't a bad read, actaully, but for this: I pretended that the main character was not Indiana Jones. There was very little archaeology or archaeological maguffins, and Indy was way too much of a Bond / Maguyver mash-up. It was a decent spy novel, but the protagonist had nothing in common with IJ other than the name.

I haven't been (un)fortunate enough to read Caidin's two novels yet. I've heard the "more like an aircraft manual" critism before. Are they really that horrible? What is it, like constant aviation descriptions/references throughout the story?
|ZiR| is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 07:08 PM   #170
Lao_Che
IndyFan
 
Lao_Che's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 369
I'd say the McCoy books are easily the most like the movies (I've read an Amazon review that says they are too much so), MacGregor takes the most risks - magic portals for example - and Caidin reads very much like the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles to me.

Last edited by Lao_Che : 05-31-2008 at 07:13 PM.
Lao_Che is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2008, 09:02 PM   #171
ValenciaGrail
IndyFan
 
ValenciaGrail's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by |ZiR|
I haven't been (un)fortunate enough to read Caidin's two novels yet. I've heard the "more like an aircraft manual" critism before. Are they really that horrible? What is it, like constant aviation descriptions/references throughout the story?

ZiR, I wouldn't say they were horrible, just not Indiana Jones.
It's rather like biting into an oatmeal raisin cookie, expecting it to be a chocolate chip. I don't hate the former - but when I'm in the mood for chocolate chip, it's a bit of a let down.

There are very lengthy technical expositions on Trimotor aircraft, the special modifcations, the freight capacity, air speed, altitude, caliber and type of machine guns....etc...etc...etc...and then detailed specs on German airships, how many gas compartments holding how much hydrogen, what the cruising range is, what the fabric covering the tanks consisted of....etc...etc...

If you are an aviation buff, I suppose you'd really like it, but it gets a bit dry otherwise.

IJ also does next to no archaeology here; he's more like a pure special agent. (How did he know so much about aircraft technology?)
This read like Robert Ludlum or Tom Clancy.

BTW - the second of the two Caidin novels, The White Witch, is much better and reads a bit more like IJ, but still not to the same degree as McCoy or McGregor. Between the two, this by far the best IMO. Indy is more like Indy again (he's like pigs on roller skates trying to learn to fly a plane), there is interesting archaeology / mythology involved once again, and the technical aircraft jargon is toned down. It almost seems as if Caidin got negative feedback from Pirates, and took a bit of a different tact for the second book.
ValenciaGrail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2008, 10:53 PM   #172
|ZiR|
IndyFan
 
|ZiR|'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New Mexico / NYC
Posts: 1,226
Thanks for the detailed answer! Love the cookie analogy.

Definitely going to give Caidin's books a chance.
|ZiR| is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 02:03 AM   #173
Violet
Moderator Emeritus
 
Violet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: The Host City of the 2018 Commonwealth Games, Australia
Posts: 3,196
The most "Indy" novels to me would be 'Dance of the Giants', 'Seven Veils' (which is kind of like KOTCS, now that I think about it in terms of it's lost city and psychic powers), 'Genesis Deluge', 'Philosopher's Stone' and 'Hollow Earth.'

As for my absolute favourite it would be between 'Dance of the Giants', 'Seven Veils' and 'Hollow Earth.'

Btw, Marion does have a very small cameo in 'Genesis Deluge'. You really have to read between the lines.
Violet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 12:54 PM   #174
tupogirl
IndyFan
 
tupogirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 436
I finally found the books at the non 24 hour Wal Mart, but it only carries 2 titles. However, none of our WM's have the actual big book section, just part of an aisle.

Are you finding more then 2 titles? Is at a WM with a bigger book section? We'll be out of state soon, so I may pick up more at a different WM. Even with my Borders coupons, they're still costing me more than they would at WM.
tupogirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 05:30 PM   #175
Crack that whip
IndyFan
 
Crack that whip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Stone Mountain, GA
Posts: 1,723
I've seen most of the books at one outlet or another, but strangely enough, hardly anyone seems to have all of them - it's as though each different store offers a different subset of the books. Even the official online Indy shop offers just ten of the twelve books, sold as a set (it's missing the last two Rob MacGregor novels, ... Unicorn's Legacy and ... Interior World, the fifth and sixth books in the overall series). It seems totally bizarre to me that even the official IJ store itself wouldn't carry them all, but there you go.

The nearby Borders here has books 3,4, 7-9, 11 & 12, while I've seen books 1 & 2 here at Albertson's (a grocery store chain). I haven't been in a brick-&-mortar store yet that has all twelve books (at least, not the current editions - I do remember seeing them all at once back when they first came out in the '90s, when I got my copies). That said, you should be able to get all of them from any major online bookseller - Amazon has all of them, for example, and I imagine the online stores for Borders / Waldenbooks, Barnes & Noble, etc. do as well (though I haven't checked them all).
Crack that whip is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:48 AM.