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Old 12-11-2009, 04:05 AM   #26
emtiem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
If we accept that the statue in the Well of Souls was already loose, then we also have to accept that the test bomb in KOTCS was a very low powered device, the fridge was designed to perfection, and luck was with Indy yet again.


If you want to justify it, I suppose you could say that the Army were testing lead lined fridges (hence it being full of food they could test afterwards) and Indy was lucky enough to grab the most high end one they'd put together!

Last edited by Attila the Professor : 12-11-2009 at 04:15 AM.
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Old 12-11-2009, 06:54 AM   #27
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I suppose KotCS doesn't have to be compared to Raiders, but we can't help but do that. I wonder why? (I don't really!) Suspense requires a good level of realism so that it seems believable re Raiders. For KotCS we had to suspend belief too much.
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Old 12-11-2009, 10:53 PM   #28
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Remember duck and cover?

Some of you folks are unbelievable. For years the government said you could survive an atomic bomb via "duck and cover" beneath a desk or under a blanket. This was the official government line! And you think a fictional movie is over the top by having the hero surviving in a lead-lined fridge?

Who knows, maybe the fridge scene is an homage to that line of thought, where in the 50's you "could" survive a blast through ingenuity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lW4s7TETtJA
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Old 12-11-2009, 11:31 PM   #29
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I like DeepSixFix's theory that it was a homage to the American theories of Nuclear protection in the 1950's.

If you think the Nuke the Fridge sequence was the most unbelievable and silly sequence in the franchise watch ToD just one more time. There is no chance in hell anyone survived that plane drop in that raft unless they flipped it and held on underneath to the edges. Then drifted down on the breeze like a parachute. And there's even flaw in that! Then the second drop over the cliff into the water would break their necks. Not to mention the heart pulling which is impossible!

But despite all that i still love ToD. Why, because I accept it as a supernatural element of the Indy universe and I also enjoy watching that sort of thing!
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Old 12-12-2009, 12:14 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Col. Detritch
I like DeepSixFix's theory that it was a homage to the American theories of Nuclear protection in the 1950's.

If you think the Nuke the Fridge sequence was the most unbelievable and silly sequence in the franchise watch ToD just one more time. There is no chance in hell anyone survived that plane drop in that raft unless they flipped it and held on underneath to the edges. Then drifted down on the breeze like a parachute. And there's even flaw in that! Then the second drop over the cliff into the water would break their necks. Not to mention the heart pulling which is impossible!


Mythbusters proved otherwise. Everyone always goes after that scene. ONCE AGAIN, it has been done.


The whole argument that that scene is the epitome of unbelievability in the franchise is tired and has always been bull. I really can't fathom that people would defend the nuke by citing that. It's just... absurd. Indy should be molten slag, period. He could have easily survived the fall.
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Old 12-12-2009, 12:41 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepSixFix
Some of you folks are unbelievable. For years the government said you could survive an atomic bomb via "duck and cover" beneath a desk or under a blanket. This was the official government line! And you think a fictional movie is over the top by having the hero surviving in a lead-lined fridge?

Who knows, maybe the fridge scene is an homage to that line of thought, where in the 50's you "could" survive a blast through ingenuity.


That's exactly what I wrote in another thread, in defence of the fridge scene. The 1950s was the atomic age - it even had 'atomic design' - such as wire hat stands with little red atomic beads on the end. There was film of soldiers watching a bomb test wearing only shorts, they were simply told to turn away when the flash went off, then afterwards they could turn back and watch the mushroom cloud rise.

The Simpsons did a similar homage when Burns brings the kids in to watch a cartoon showing a friendly atom explaining how safe nuclear power was.

Raymond Brigg's 'When the Wind Blows' had the main character sitting under a door leant against the wall as protection from the bomb - he was following government advice!

Fear or nuclear attack hung over the cold war period, and almost became reality during the Cuban missile crisis. However, on the other side of the coin, nuclear energy was the wonder energy of the future, and had to be sold as safe to the public.

The fridge is a comedic reference to an absurd point in history, and because Indy doesn't occupy our world, he actually gets away with it.

I don't see what the big deal is, as Lucas never set out to present Indiana Jones as a documentary or even a film based on real events. Historical reference points exist to give us a sense of familiarity. If Lucas had been bothered with accuracy in Raiders he would have realized that Nepal was off limits, Egypt unlikely, Afrika Korps not yet created, and most of his weapons were before their time. It wasn't wrong, because he made the film he intended, and one that we, as fans, now regard as classic. The three other films follow the same principles.

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Old 12-12-2009, 03:02 AM   #32
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Those points of accuracy are all to do with history and they are not what is being disputed here. We are talking about the believability of Indiana Jones' escapades as carried out by stuntmen, props, CG, etc. The point that the fridge scene might be a reference to the 1950s propaganda is good one. It may well have been a reference, but it didn't do anything for believability in terms of Indiana Jones escaping peril. We see him get into the fridge and then roll out of it unscathed. It's quite unlike the Indiana Jones we are used to seeing running, fighting, jumping, flying, etc, etc out of trouble.
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Old 12-12-2009, 04:56 AM   #33
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I'm playing devil's advocate here, because I'm finding reason for an absurd event.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
Those points of accuracy are all to do with history and they are not what is being disputed here.

I see the fact that the world Indy occupies isn't our history indicative of the fact that Indy can escape situations a normal person couldn't. Lucas intended Indy's world as the world of pulp - and by its very nature it involves exaggerated action.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
We are talking about the believability of Indiana Jones' escapades as carried out by stuntmen, props, CG, etc.

But there is very little believability in Indiana Jones if you apply real-world logic and physics to the events portrayed. For Indy to escape he must rely upon a level of luck beyond normal averages, and with luck many more things become possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
The point that the fridge scene might be a reference to the 1950s propaganda is good one. It may well have been a reference, but it didn't do anything for believability in terms of Indiana Jones escaping peril. We see him get into the fridge and then roll out of it unscathed. It's quite unlike the Indiana Jones we are used to seeing running, fighting, jumping, flying, etc, etc out of trouble.

Indy's not as young as he used to be, he couldn't outrun the explosion on foot, the Russians wouldn't stop to pick him up, and there wasn't any public transport available. So he used the next best method of conveyance: a top of the range lead-lined fridge.

It's just a funny moment. Because we don't see Indy in the fridge when it impacts the ground we have to imagine that it protected him by the nature of its design. Just like Indy's clothes protected him from extreme friction burns when he was being dragged over the desert road behind the truck. Even that scene would have been more beleivable if his clothes had been ripped. Once Lucas has done the seemingly impossible escape once, it was inevitable that he would take it further and further.

The aftermath of Nagasaki and Hiroshima prove that not everything is destroyed. With luck Indy's fridge remains intact, gets blasted away from ground zero before the radiation, and protects him during landing.

The most unbelievable part of his great fridge adventure isn't so much the journey away from the explosion as the landing itself. We have to accept that the fridge can absorb the impacts, whilst Indy is safe inside. Stuntmen strap themselves tightly into a vehicle and allow the vehicle to absorb the impact. Indy forces himself tightly into the fridge and allows the fridge to absorb the impact.

Of course, this is all presuming that the Indy luck holds out.
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Old 12-12-2009, 06:18 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
Those points of accuracy are all to do with history and they are not what is being disputed here. We are talking about the believability of Indiana Jones' escapades as carried out by stuntmen, props, CG, etc.

And the scene was carried out as believably as possible by CG. It wasn't gonna happen any other way, I don't think even Steve Spielberg has the power to get permission to set off a Nuclear weapon in the desert and let a stunt man ride it out in a fridge. Why, one it’s a Nuclear weapon, and two it is near impossible for a stunt man to survive. That’s right I agree. But the fact is in Indy’s Universe, though sheer luck Indy can survive these type of things!

The film makers wanted Indy to be effected by and realise the power of a nuclear weapon as an important symbol in the movie. So Indy had to 'experience on first hand. If you have a better way to have Indy escape the blast safely and plausibly and make it out to witness the awesome power of its detonation please illuminate me- I'm all ears!
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Old 12-12-2009, 09:45 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by DeepSixFix
Some of you folks are unbelievable. For years the government said you could survive an atomic bomb via "duck and cover" beneath a desk or under a blanket. This was the official government line! And you think a fictional movie is over the top by having the hero surviving in a lead-lined fridge?

Not really as well-constructed a response as Montana's, is it? He brings facts, you just bring cynicism based on what you reckon!
Here's a guy visiting one of the test houses which is still standing:
http://www.cmdrmark.com/20031.html

Quote:
Anything above ground (or not behind massive earth bunkers) and less than 2500 feet from ground zero was destroyed. We saw the Apple II test house. The film clip of the house getting hit with a blast is frequently seen on television specials. Despite the 29 kiloton blast, the house actually survived; The mannequins inside moved only "slightly". Mannequins by windows indicate that those people would not have survived the initial blast however those in more protected areas of the house suffered no burn effects. The exterior paint was burnt off in the heat blast but the 2 story, 6 room house with fireplace still stands. The tour passed a surviving portion of the railroad bridge. Surprisingly, the 12 inch steel beams supporting the outside of the bridge were as straight as the day the were made, while the three foot inner beams had a six foot bend in their middle resembling the letter C! The smaller beams survived while the larger beams presented more profile to the blast resulting in the bending. The Mosler bank safe did a good job holding up against the blast. For the items stored inside, records indicate the gold was shiny, the silver tarnished, paper money "crackled" and paper records survived albeit in very fragile condition.

There's even an account from a guy there who got too close to one of the detonations (2000 feet he reckons) and survived. We don't know any of the specifics about the blast in the film (distance from the bomb, size of the bomb etc.) so it's impossible to say what would happen. Seeing all of the houses being destroyed would imply that they were closer than the Apple II houses, but nothing's certain and Indy's lucky It's implausible, but as presented, and with a little touch of movie logic, it's not absolutely impossible.


And how do you think you could see film of the houses closer to the detonation being destroyed? Yup, they were in lead-lined cases! And I'd guess that would be to survive the radiation from being in the blast zone for so long, unlike Indy.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
That's exactly what I wrote in another thread, in defence of the fridge scene. The 1950s was the atomic age - it even had 'atomic design' - such as wire hat stands with little red atomic beads on the end. There was film of soldiers watching a bomb test wearing only shorts, they were simply told to turn away when the flash went off, then afterwards they could turn back and watch the mushroom cloud rise.

Yes, and that did happen, and you're fine to do that. Not many times, obviously and I wouldn't want to be there, but you can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ResidentAlien
Mythbusters proved otherwise. Everyone always goes after that scene. ONCE AGAIN, it has been done.


MUCH larger raft, only one unmoving person in it right in the centre, perfect lab conditions, dropped from higher altitude (presumably- theirs seemed to take much longer to come down)... etc. It didn't even inflate when they dropped it.
In theory, you can survive a drop from a plane on a life raft. In theory you can survive a nuclear blast, especially if you're in a lead-lined case and move out of the blast zone very quickly. As both of these are presented in the Indy movies they become much, much more unlikely; but they're more entertaining that way!

The raft is much like the fridge thing; it's very, very implausible that anyone could survive; but on the face of it not utterly, 100% impossible. The mine cart jump I find harder to swallow, frankly. Or even surviving holding onto a large rope bridge swinging into a rock face.

Were there even such a thing as self-inflating rafts in the 30s? I have no idea.

Last edited by emtiem : 12-12-2009 at 10:06 AM.
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Old 12-12-2009, 09:58 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by DeepSixFix
Some of you folks are unbelievable.

This I agree with...
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Old 12-12-2009, 10:01 AM   #37
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This I agree with...

It's easy to make snide comments but obviously not so easy to back them up.
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Old 12-12-2009, 10:26 AM   #38
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We have to remember that Mickey Rooney survived the atomic bomb without a fridge:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWGsryWhxIA

This scene from "The Atomic Kid" (1954) was the genesis for the whole Doomtown sequence. They combined it with the fridge idea from the early draft of Back To The Future.

"How did he survive?"
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Old 12-12-2009, 10:47 AM   #39
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It's easy to make snide comments but obviously not so easy to back them up.

Tis true, and I find it funny as hell that you idiots imagine you can.

The first variable that you CANNOT account for is the value of the bomb's yield.


Until you can provide this, (as I say) YOU CANT, (as you say) BACK [it] UP.

You are right about one thing: it IS easy to make snide comments, even though I didn't. Though it seems you're taking this very personally, your poor interpretation of a purposefully ambiguous post is great insight into the way you "see" things.

Try asking questions first, it might assist in the perception that your "scientific" endevors and "research" are not so tainted by your emotions.

It's easy to make painfully obvious comments but not so easy to actually read a thread for adequate context.

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Old 12-12-2009, 11:28 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
The first variable that you CANNOT account for is the value of the bomb's yield.

Until you can provide this, (as I say) YOU CANT, (as you say) BACK [it] UP.


That sort of variable goes with any of Indy's escapes. Whether or not the statue in the Well of Souls is loose enough to push over; whether or not the sand that Indy is dragged over behind the truck is nice and soft, or riddled with sharp stones. It was obviously a small yield, since Lucas wasn't intending to kill Indy off.

The point is whether something is possible or probable. It is possible for Indy to survive his wild escapades because he has supernatural luck. It is not probable that in the real world a real person would survive, although it may be possible. Evidence from Japan and from nuclear testing confirms that an atom bomb does not obliterate everything. Seemingly insubtantial objects such as walls and trees stood up to the immense forces. In fact people were charred to ash, leaving shadows on walls and concrete (thermal radiation evaporated the fluid in their bodies, but did not affect the solid object they were standing in front of).

The original question was 'Can it be done?' Well, it would take a scientist and a living subject to answer that definitively, so I don't think we're going to know the answer.

However, in the confines of an Indiana Jones movie, which assumes that our hero is stocked up on luck, and every minute detail of the event follows the script, then it is possible for Indy survive, and therefore plausible.

Science has already shown what can survive such a blast.
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Old 12-12-2009, 11:28 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
Tis true, and I find it funny as hell that you idiots imagine you can.

The first variable that you CANNOT account for is the value of the bomb's yield.


Until you can provide this, (as I say) YOU CANT, (as you say) BACK [it] UP.

I don't have to back it up and say it definitely could have happened as we saw it: I'm just saying there's reasonable doubt there as to whether it's possible. You've utterly failed to grasp what's going on here. Read the first post again; kongisking said "have fun and just imagine, for a brief moment, how this could possibly work?". To understand that sentence is neither brain surgery nor rocket science, Rocket Surgeon.

If we're accepting the Mythbusters life raft thing as proof that the Temple raft escape can work, despite them changing every single variable in order to make it more possible, then why the hell would I have to say what yield the bomb is? Why are you so singularly incapable of reading in my and other posts that it 'depends on the size of the bomb'? It may be possible if the bomb was a fairly low yield. Read my post above where I give examples of objects and even men surviving blasts. You can only PROVE it's impossible by giving me examples of people in lead-lined fridges being killed at the same distance and from the same yield bomb as in the film- until you can provide this, (as I say) YOU CANT, BACK UP your witless little comments bashing everyone who's having a fun time talking about this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
You are right about one thing: it IS easy to make snide comments, even though I didn't.

Oh don't be so pathetic as to lie.
'Snide' means to be maliciously derogatory and to show haughty disdain. Obviously you find 'us folks unbelievable' in a nice way. Sorry, I mean some of us 'idiots'. What a charmer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
Though it seems you're taking this very personally, your poor interpretation of a purposefully ambiguous post is great insight into the way you "see" things.

Pray tell how you mean everybody to take you calling us 'idiots', then? Is there some definition of the word 'idiot' that's in some way complementary in modern society that I've not come across before? I can't believe you don't even have the backbone to stand behind your own snide little comments. I've already used the word, but it is truly pathetic.

I've seen your ridiculous outbursts on this board before and I do have to wonder how you even function as a member of society. Don't bother replying with more puerile insults: I'm not interested in an argument and as soon as this is posted I'll be looking for an 'ignore' function on this board so I don't have to endure any more of your moronic and inflammatory posts. I'll happily continue talking to anyone else about this subject, though, as I was having fun talking about it in a sensible manner, and I thank kongisking for coming up with a fun idea for thread.
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Old 12-12-2009, 11:46 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Wilhelm
We have to remember that Mickey Rooney survived the atomic bomb without a fridge:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWGsryWhxIA

This scene from "The Atomic Kid" (1954) was the genesis for the whole Doomtown sequence. They combined it with the fridge idea from the early draft of Back To The Future.

"How did he survive?"


Ha! That's brilliant! Thanks for sharing- amazing how similar it is to the Indy version when he's running around before the blast!
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Old 12-12-2009, 02:04 PM   #43
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Including the mannequins and that he sees the tower with the bomb from the window.
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Old 12-12-2009, 02:18 PM   #44
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After KOTCS and watching that "Atomic Kid" clip, I think we've missed the big picture here. You don't need quick wits or a fridge to survive a nuclear blast.


You just need some form of hat atop your head.
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Old 12-12-2009, 03:12 PM   #45
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Since people seem to be so dissatisfied with the scene, this is how I would change it if I could:

While Indy was escaping the warehouse in that hijacked truck, the Russians would have spotted the Ark and stopped to load that up too, as just another treasure to study back home in Russia. It is the very same truck, then, carrying the Ark that is the one sent to Doom Town to search for Indy.

When the countdown begins, and the Reds panic, they squeal out of there, recklessly swerving around in the process. This causes the crate with the Ark to fall out of the back and into the street. Meanwhile, Indy tries to find some kind of shelter, and is about to give up all hope when he spots…the Ark!

With ten seconds to go, Indy desperately drags off the lid, jumps in, puts the lid back on, and then BOOM! The bomb goes off, the town is destroyed…and the Ark is completely undamaged, having not moved an inch from where it sat. Once the wind/debris/radiation die down, Indy clambers out completely unharmed!

And thus the incredible irony that the very same artifact that deep-fried a bunch of Aryans this time decided to save the life of the man who had risked his well-being to protect it all those years ago. The Ark was, therefore, rather returning the favor! How’s that for a cool cliffhanger and a simultaneous nod to Raiders, eh? And to boot, the Ark magically granted Indy immunity to the radioactive fallout, explaining that little problem!

Now THIS would have been balls-breakingly awesome!
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Old 12-12-2009, 08:15 PM   #46
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I'm back. So, Montana, you are saying there's absolutely no believability in the first part of Raiders? Indiana avoiding traps, swinging across a pit, dodging arrows, leaping across same pit just making it, scrambling under a descending wall, outrunning a boulder and outrunning natives with spears, blow darts and bow and arrow? Just couldn't ever be done? Thoroughly impossible? The laws of physics implied therein must belong to a totally unrelated universe? Is inconceivable? Beyond imagination? OF COURSE YOU DO NOT! The whole point of those scenes is that it comes across as possible. He's not doing anything that a human possibly couldn't do. Now, likelihood is a different issue and I don't want to enter into that as it is irrelevant here. How do we as the viewers get almost motivated off our chairs due to the suspense? That's what Raiders did. And of course I know there's no other way to escape the atomic blast in the Nuked Fridge scene, but it is undeniably a diversion from the tone that exemplified Indiana Jones originally, which is to stay within the parameters of believability. Now don't get me wrong, I didn't mind the scene, there was a moment of suspense as Indy is looking for an escape in that last ten seconds and the orange stuck in the door brought that to a climax. The ensuing scene is actually a parallel to the implication of Indy riding a submarine's periscope all the way to the Nazi island - you couldn't actually see him coping. I think in the book he lashes himself to the periscope with his whip and endures the elements, which still is more believable than surviving a nuclear blast in a fridge. My whole point is how the movie makers are going towards more cartoonish scenes, which is a pity, because the tone of Raiders is far more enjoyable and satisfactory.
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Old 12-12-2009, 08:41 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kongisking
Since people seem to be so dissatisfied with the scene, this is how I would change it if I could:

While Indy was escaping the warehouse in that hijacked truck, the Russians would have spotted the Ark and stopped to load that up too, as just another treasure to study back home in Russia. It is the very same truck, then, carrying the Ark that is the one sent to Doom Town to search for Indy.

When the countdown begins, and the Reds panic, they squeal out of there, recklessly swerving around in the process. This causes the crate with the Ark to fall out of the back and into the street. Meanwhile, Indy tries to find some kind of shelter, and is about to give up all hope when he spots…the Ark!

With ten seconds to go, Indy desperately drags off the lid, jumps in, puts the lid back on, and then BOOM! The bomb goes off, the town is destroyed…and the Ark is completely undamaged, having not moved an inch from where it sat. Once the wind/debris/radiation die down, Indy clambers out completely unharmed!

And thus the incredible irony that the very same artifact that deep-fried a bunch of Aryans this time decided to save the life of the man who had risked his well-being to protect it all those years ago. The Ark was, therefore, rather returning the favor! How’s that for a cool cliffhanger and a simultaneous nod to Raiders, eh? And to boot, the Ark magically granted Indy immunity to the radioactive fallout, explaining that little problem!

Now THIS would have been balls-breakingly awesome!

I like you and all kong but no way, man. That's just super corny ridunkculous.

And for the record, I like the nuke the fridge scene.
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Old 12-12-2009, 11:09 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
So, Montana, you are saying there's absolutely no believability in the first part of Raiders? Indiana avoiding traps, swinging across a pit, dodging arrows, leaping across same pit just making it, scrambling under a descending wall, outrunning a boulder and outrunning natives with spears, blow darts and bow and arrow? Just couldn't ever be done? Thoroughly impossible? The laws of physics implied therein must belong to a totally unrelated universe? Is inconceivable? Beyond imagination? OF COURSE YOU DO NOT!


I never wrote any of that. My words were: "But there is very little believability in Indiana Jones if you apply real-world logic and physics to the events portrayed."

To be believable you have to accept a supernatural level of luck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
The whole point of those scenes is that it comes across as possible. He's not doing anything that a human possibly couldn't do. Now, likelihood is a different issue and I don't want to enter into that as it is irrelevant here.

They're all possible if you accept that Indy will always roll a six on a die when required.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
How do we as the viewers get almost motivated off our chairs due to the suspense? That's what Raiders did. And of course I know there's no other way to escape the atomic blast in the Nuked Fridge scene, but it is undeniably a diversion from the tone that exemplified Indiana Jones originally, which is to stay within the parameters of believability.

If you believe a single man can have that much luck in succession.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
Now don't get me wrong, I didn't mind the scene, there was a moment of suspense as Indy is looking for an escape in that last ten seconds and the orange stuck in the door brought that to a climax. The ensuing scene is actually a parallel to the implication of Indy riding a submarine's periscope all the way to the Nazi island - you couldn't actually see him coping. I think in the book he lashes himself to the periscope with his whip and endures the elements, which still is more believable than surviving a nuclear blast in a fridge. My whole point is how the movie makers are going towards more cartoonish scenes, which is a pity, because the tone of Raiders is far more enjoyable and satisfactory.

There are lots of cartoonish scenes throughout the series. If the science of a nuclear explosion and the evidence from previous explosions say that a fridge can survive, why can't luck come into play as it always does for Indy?
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Old 12-13-2009, 01:15 AM   #49
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I know where you are coming from and I'm not trying to quibble, but I think you are just missing my point by a fraction. Applying real world physics to Indiana Jones would seriously lower the odds of his surviving just the first parts of his movie adventures let alone the rest, but I'm not wanting to apply real world physics, just movie viewing acceptability. To me, Indiana Jones' fictitious adventures exist between the possible and the impossible. Each of his antics will go closer to one or the other. It's not black or white, although most times he goes close to the extremes, which he has to because of the nature of escapist entertainment. Indiana Jones is a lucky man no doubt, but he stays tethered to reality as part of being appealing to the ordinary Joe. From this, my view is that Raiders keeps him tethered more and KotCS much less so, the former being my preference and the latter much less so.
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Old 12-13-2009, 05:14 AM   #50
emtiem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickiana
I'm back. So, Montana, you are saying there's absolutely no believability in the first part of Raiders? Indiana avoiding traps, swinging across a pit, dodging arrows, leaping across same pit just making it, scrambling under a descending wall, outrunning a boulder and outrunning natives with spears, blow darts and bow and arrow? Just couldn't ever be done? Thoroughly impossible? The laws of physics implied therein must belong to a totally unrelated universe? Is inconceivable? Beyond imagination? OF COURSE YOU DO NOT! The whole point of those scenes is that it comes across as possible. He's not doing anything that a human possibly couldn't do. Now, likelihood is a different issue and I don't want to enter into that as it is irrelevant here. How do we as the viewers get almost motivated off our chairs due to the suspense? That's what Raiders did. And of course I know there's no other way to escape the atomic blast in the Nuked Fridge scene, but it is undeniably a diversion from the tone that exemplified Indiana Jones originally, which is to stay within the parameters of believability. Now don't get me wrong, I didn't mind the scene, there was a moment of suspense as Indy is looking for an escape in that last ten seconds and the orange stuck in the door brought that to a climax. The ensuing scene is actually a parallel to the implication of Indy riding a submarine's periscope all the way to the Nazi island - you couldn't actually see him coping. I think in the book he lashes himself to the periscope with his whip and endures the elements, which still is more believable than surviving a nuclear blast in a fridge. My whole point is how the movie makers are going towards more cartoonish scenes, which is a pity, because the tone of Raiders is far more enjoyable and satisfactory.


There aren't actually ancient temples which have darts, light sensors, bottomless pits, massive rolling boulders and priceless idols sitting on pressure pads in the real world, you know. It started out as being pretty cartoonish. And, as with James Bond, when they saw that people liked the tone of that movie they decided they could push it a bit more in the next. Whether that be with situation (Idol's Temple) or physics (Marion surviving a fall of a couple of storeys) I liked it.
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