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Old 02-27-2008, 12:12 PM   #26
deckard24
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Maybe one of you die-hard YIJC fans can tell me this, does Indy(as played by SPF) in the very last few episodes start to show some signs of him maturing into the Indy we know circa 1935? I've only seen a handful of the CC Young Indy episodes and the same for the SPF ones. SPF's portrayal is what made me lose interest in the series, because he never came across to me as a younger version of Ford's Indy. So since I gave up early on the series, does he mature into a closer resemblance of the Fortune and Glory Indy?
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Old 02-27-2008, 06:34 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by metalinvader
Congrats,Raiders112390 for getting into this amazing and overlooked series.What was your favorite episode?

I can't say I have A favorite but Love's Sweet Song, Spring Break Adventure, Mystery of the Blues, Masks of Evil and Treasure of the Peacock's Eye are my favorites.
Spring Break Adventure, Masks of Evil and TotPE are important ''episodes'' because in Spring Break Adventure Indy uses the whip; Treasure of the Peacock's Eye is a glimpse into Indy's future and Masks of Evil is his first encounter with the supernatural.
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Old 02-27-2008, 11:08 PM   #28
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That's the thing, if a kid can imagine Indy as a regualr kid, not some fast witted person who gets in abnormal situations, than they see him as an adult and his situations and it gives them insparataion


At the Somme Indy witnesses the horror of war and is then captured and sent to a high security prison and must try to escape with the help of Charles de Gaul.

At Verdun he witnessed the killing of over 600 of his allies and then was faced with the decision to obey the General of the Army by sending a letter to begin the attack AGAIN (even though NOW two Big Bertha's have been brought in), or acting on his conscious by destroying the letter, disobeying the General but saving many lives for one day...

In the Congo he almost DIED but was saved by Albert Schweitzer. This episode perfectly showed his mortality as well as teaching people about the sanctity of human life!

In Russia during the Russian revolution he befriended some Bolsheviks (while spying against them in the Intelligence)... Mixed between friendship and duty he and his friends have some sort of a falling out and Indy goes to warn them that they will be killed if they continue the revolution! Indy runs out in the streets crying to stop them when a load of machine gun fire is opened up... many non-famous Russians are killed.

These aren't the only good story lines... there are many more! Yes, he does tend to meet a lot of historical figures, but there are times he comes across may non-historical ones as well... if you think about it, everyone's life is a journey; as is Indy's.

Yes, in Young Indy they do keep the same idea of fantasy and drama that was in the originals... but they do show pretty much all things in a realistic light. Death is so real in these films. Life is so precious and beloved. These films make you think of what's important in life. It's not all about Indy, it's about a child growing up in hard times...
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Old 02-28-2008, 04:38 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deckard24
Maybe one of you die-hard YIJC fans can tell me this, does Indy(as played by SPF) in the very last few episodes start to show some signs of him maturing into the Indy we know circa 1935? I've only seen a handful of the CC Young Indy episodes and the same for the SPF ones. SPF's portrayal is what made me lose interest in the series, because he never came across to me as a younger version of Ford's Indy. So since I gave up early on the series, does he mature into a closer resemblance of the Fortune and Glory Indy?

No. He doesn't turn into a mercenary. Not even a resemblance. I would say closer to the "That belongs in a museum!" Indy. But at the same time, they never got making Season 3, which had scripts more akin to the films with characters such as Abner and Belloq and a certain skull made of crystal, which would have allowed the development of a resemblance of the Fortune and Glory Indy. I think it would have happened had Fate and a certain TV channel allowed it but I guess that won't ever happen now.
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Old 02-28-2008, 09:40 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Violet Indy
No. He doesn't turn into a mercenary. Not even a resemblance. I would say closer to the "That belongs in a museum!" Indy. But at the same time, they never got making Season 3, which had scripts more akin to the films with characters such as Abner and Belloq and a certain skull made of crystal, which would have allowed the development of a resemblance of the Fortune and Glory Indy. I think it would have happened had Fate and a certain TV channel allowed it but I guess that won't ever happen now.
Thanks, that answers my question!

I know he had to go through a transformation, so it only makes sense he wouldn't be like the Indy from TOD as a teenager. Maybe season 3 would have done the trick!
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Old 02-28-2008, 09:54 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Violet Indy
I think it would have happened had Fate and a certain TV channel allowed it but I guess that won't ever happen now.

Unless he decides to make a new Young Indy series.
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:49 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by IndyJr.
At the Somme Indy witnesses the horror of war and is then captured and sent to a high security prison and must try to escape with the help of Charles de Gaul.

At Verdun he witnessed the killing of over 600 of his allies and then was faced with the decision to obey the General of the Army by sending a letter to begin the attack AGAIN (even though NOW two Big Bertha's have been brought in), or acting on his conscious by destroying the letter, disobeying the General but saving many lives for one day...

In the Congo he almost DIED but was saved by Albert Schweitzer. This episode perfectly showed his mortality as well as teaching people about the sanctity of human life!

In Russia during the Russian revolution he befriended some Bolsheviks (while spying against them in the Intelligence)... Mixed between friendship and duty he and his friends have some sort of a falling out and Indy goes to warn them that they will be killed if they continue the revolution! Indy runs out in the streets crying to stop them when a load of machine gun fire is opened up... many non-famous Russians are killed.

These aren't the only good story lines... there are many more! Yes, he does tend to meet a lot of historical figures, but there are times he comes across may non-historical ones as well... if you think about it, everyone's life is a journey; as is Indy's.

Yes, in Young Indy they do keep the same idea of fantasy and drama that was in the originals... but they do show pretty much all things in a realistic light. Death is so real in these films. Life is so precious and beloved. These films make you think of what's important in life. It's not all about Indy, it's about a child growing up in hard times...

Very good post!
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Old 03-04-2008, 03:50 PM   #33
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It's a great thing to have come across. I was so lucky to discover this on BBC Two in 2004. I don't think it has ever been aired since. I am so glad to be owner of Volume 1 but I need to wait a little while for Volume 2 to come out over here.
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Old 03-05-2008, 12:41 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Raiders112390
I have to say, I just got the DVDs, they're awesome.

Of course they are. Michael Bay demanded it:
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Old 04-14-2008, 08:29 PM   #35
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Truly an amazing series.
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Old 04-15-2008, 06:10 PM   #36
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michael bay clip=rotfl

thanks for posting that michael bay youtube clip, that made my whole day watching that.
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Old 04-16-2008, 12:15 AM   #37
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People say the YIJC show an Indy that acts "out of character". To that I could counter that in LC, Indy acts ''out of character'' with ToD. He goes from being a treasure hunter in search of nothing more than ''fortune and glory'' to becoming a conservationalist who believes that the artifacts he discovers ''belong in a museum'' in the space of 3 years.

But Indiana Jones is a realistic character in that his personality, and his views on things, changed over time, like a real person's views and ideas would.

What we see in YIJC is his life. Henry Jones, Jr. didn't come out of the womb with a fedora on his head and a whip in his hand. The alter-ego, ''Indiana'', formed slowly, starting with an innocent rebellion in Indy's rejection of his true name for that of the name Indiana.
The events shown in the YIJC (or Adventures of Young Indiana Jones) help to mold Indy into what the man we see in the movies.
In WWI, Indy learns how to use deception and how to improvise on the spot, something which he would come to do quite often in the movies. We see him having a bit more experience with the whip--a foreshadowing of how important a tool it would become to him--We see his first fist fights, going from a naive fighter to a dirty fighter by the end of the series. We see his first brushes with corruption and dissapointment, which would begin to bring his cynicism to the surface. We see his first true treasure hunt. We see the distance between him and his father and the gradual breakdown of their relationship. We see how Indy became interested in archeology. We also see how he learned all the languages he spoke in the trilogy (and many more) and how he became so knowledgable about the ancient world.
Between 1916 and 1920, Indy dates and has casual flings with a number of women (years of field work), and by the end of the series, has no qualms about dating three women at once.

People say it's unrealistic for Indy to meet all of the famous people he meets--but in the majority of cases they weren't famous when he met them--and isn't it even more unrealistic for Nazis' faces to melt? For a man to age and turn to dust within seconds? For a 700 year old knight to still live? For a man to live without his heart in his chest? Is it not impossible (or at least very very difficult) to actually perform the truck stunt in ROTLA the way it looks in the movie?

So I would say when we're watching the YIJC, we are truly watching the early life of the man we see in ROTLA, TOD and LC; the historical aspect of the show is simply a bonus.
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Old 04-16-2008, 09:34 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
People say the YIJC show an Indy that acts "out of character". To that I could counter that in LC, Indy acts ''out of character'' with ToD. He goes from being a treasure hunter in search of nothing more than ''fortune and glory'' to becoming a conservationalist who believes that the artifacts he discovers ''belong in a museum'' in the space of 3 years.

But Indiana Jones is a realistic character in that his personality, and his views on things, changed over time, like a real person's views and ideas would.

What we see in YIJC is his life. Henry Jones, Jr. didn't come out of the womb with a fedora on his head and a whip in his hand. The alter-ego, ''Indiana'', formed slowly, starting with an innocent rebellion in Indy's rejection of his true name for that of the name Indiana.
The events shown in the YIJC (or Adventures of Young Indiana Jones) help to mold Indy into what the man we see in the movies.
In WWI, Indy learns how to use deception and how to improvise on the spot, something which he would come to do quite often in the movies. We see him having a bit more experience with the whip--a foreshadowing of how important a tool it would become to him--We see his first fist fights, going from a naive fighter to a dirty fighter by the end of the series. We see his first brushes with corruption and dissapointment, which would begin to bring his cynicism to the surface. We see his first true treasure hunt. We see the distance between him and his father and the gradual breakdown of their relationship. We see how Indy became interested in archeology. We also see how he learned all the languages he spoke in the trilogy (and many more) and how he became so knowledgable about the ancient world.
Between 1916 and 1920, Indy dates and has casual flings with a number of women (years of field work), and by the end of the series, has no qualms about dating three women at once.

So I would say when we're watching the YIJC, we are truly watching the early life of the man we see in ROTLA, TOD and LC; the historical aspect of the show is simply a bonus.

And that's why Indiana Jones is the greatest character ever created.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
People say it's unrealistic for Indy to meet all of the famous people he meets--but in the majority of cases they weren't famous when he met them--and isn't it even more unrealistic for Nazis' faces to melt? For a man to age and turn to dust within seconds? For a 700 year old knight to still live? For a man to live without his heart in his chest? Is it not impossible (or at least very very difficult) to actually perform the truck stunt in ROTLA the way it looks in the movie?

Why is it so many people say that anyway? Is it not blatantly obvious to them how unrealistic the films are?
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Old 04-19-2008, 01:11 AM   #39
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Because they are narrrow-minded and can seem to accept Christian and Hindu myths as being factual but not the lives of people who actually lived, or the idea of Aliens it seems.
I'm going to go watch Love's Sweet Song =]
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Old 12-31-2009, 09:34 PM   #40
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I just remembered something that I think I should share with everyone here.It's a funny story about back when my sister and I were shopping for The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones Volume 1 & 2 DVD set,most likely in late 2007,because that's when the first two volumes came out,or we could have been shopping for them in early 2008,after they were already out on DVD.
Anyway,we went to a video/DVD store in the mall and I asked the male clerk(who appeared to be in his 30s),"Does this store have the first two seasons of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles?" (I called them that,because at the time,I didn't know that the DVDs were called The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones.)He had a confused and somewhat shocked look on his face and said,"What's that?" I said,"It's an Indiana Jones T.V. show." Then he responded,"I never knew they made a T.V. show about Indiana Jones?!" As it turned out,the store did have the first two volumes and the clerk was surprised to see them on the shelf(top shelf on the far left).

Last edited by AnnieJones : 12-31-2009 at 09:43 PM.
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Old 01-02-2010, 10:58 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by AnnieJones
I just remembered something that I think I should share with everyone here.It's a funny story about back when my sister and I were shopping for The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones Volume 1 & 2 DVD set,most likely in late 2007,because that's when the first two volumes came out,or we could have been shopping for them in early 2008,after they were already out on DVD.
Anyway,we went to a video/DVD store in the mall and I asked the male clerk(who appeared to be in his 30s),"Does this store have the first two seasons of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles?" (I called them that,because at the time,I didn't know that the DVDs were called The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones.)He had a confused and somewhat shocked look on his face and said,"What's that?" I said,"It's an Indiana Jones T.V. show." Then he responded,"I never knew they made a T.V. show about Indiana Jones?!" As it turned out,the store did have the first two volumes and the clerk was surprised to see them on the shelf(top shelf on the far left).
I recently discussed this event with my sister and she reminded me that we went to Best Buy first,then the mall.The guy who worked at Best Buy appeared to be in his 20s and gave us a similar reaction when we asked him if the store had those DVDs.She(my sister)reminded me that he was equally shocked when he saw that the DVDs were there on the shelf.But for some reason,I remember the incident from the mall,not the one from Best Buy.Anyway,there you have it.
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Old 01-03-2010, 02:15 AM   #42
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I love the Young Indiana Jones series, allthough I have to admit I missed most of it when it was on tv at the time.

I had had a serious accident at the time and spent more than a year in hospital, so I am very happy to discover them on DVD now.

Also I believe that some credit has to be given to the documentaries included in the DVD's. They are great, educational and entertaining at the same time!

Excellent work!
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Old 01-07-2010, 09:43 PM   #43
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I can't say enough good things about the YIJC. I've been a fan since the show first came out on TV in 1992-1993, and saw all of the U.S. network (and later cable) broadcasts of the show at that time. The YIJC is a truly superb, entertaining, and educational TV show that really gives the viewer a good picture of much of the history that took place in the early 20th century. For example, WWI was heavily covered, and this is a very rare subject to see as the focus of a TV show (especially an American TV show). In addition to being a great history lesson, we also get to see the character development of IJ as a child/young man, and we see shades of the character that grows up to become the IJ of the films.
Also, the budget was huge for a network TV show - all of the costumes/settings, etc. were quite impressive, and as far as I know most of the show was filmed on location. It seemed to have the budget equivalent to a major Hollywood production, which was amazing for a TV show at that time.

I remember at the time the show was originally on, I was talking to a friend about it - they complained to me that, "The show would be great, if it wasn't so educational". What they didn't understand was that the educational aspect was the whole point! However, this aspect is the main reason the show didn't do well on American TV - I think it was truly too good for broadcast TV (at least broadcast TV at that time). I also think the audience was expecting a show that was an extension of the films, with all of the action, etc., and that wasn't at all what the show was supposed to be about.

Anyway, it's a shame the show didn't last longer - it would have been great to have seen a 3rd (and 4th, 5th, and 6th) seasons, in which IJ would have met Belloq for the first time, etc.

Kudos to G. Lucas for making the show, and for also eventualy releasing it on DVD for new fans to discover.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:19 PM   #44
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I just started watching this series on DVD, and will work my way through chronologically (as I guess that's how the DVD set roughly arranges the series).

I've been trying to ignore Young Indy for years, having dismissed it as something barely associated with the big screen character. However, coming to the Raven and inadvertently reading high praise of the series from educated quarters, raised my interest.

The thing that immediately impressed me, apart from the quality of the acting, was the use of real locations. So many television series are so obviously fake that they aren't engaging (such as 'Relic Hunter' where it's a case of 'this week the local park will be Russia, next week it's going to be the Amazon').

The attention to detail, with regards to props and scenery, is fascinating.

I used to be put off by the idea that Indy would meet a famous person everywhere he went, but once you're engrossed in an episode it appears to be quite natural. Henry Sr. is travelling the world and moving in high society.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:37 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by Montana Smith
I just started watching this series on DVD, and will work my way through chronologically (as I guess that's how the DVD set roughly arranges the series).

I've been trying to ignore Young Indy for years, having dismissed it as something barely associated with the big screen character. However, coming to the Raven and inadvertently reading high praise of the series from educated quarters, raised my interest.

I'm doing the same...if you want a nice Young Indy companion-piece listen to the next Indy-Cast,(specifically the trivia).
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Old 01-09-2010, 03:05 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
I just started watching this series on DVD, and will work my way through chronologically (as I guess that's how the DVD set roughly arranges the series).

As a warning, you'll probably enjoy a chronological watching more if you keep in mind two facets:

* The DVD/telefilms are, for the most part, comprised of two originally separate 45 minute episodes combined together to make the 90 minute telefilm.
* Each of the original 45 minute episodes has, rather intentionally, a distinctly different tone.

For example, when you get to "Espionage Escapades", don't be expecting either a continuation of the action/adventures of "Attack of the Hawkmen" or the suspense of "Adventures in the Secret Service". Expect two distinct stories; each humorous, but in unique ways - Barcelona is slapstick, Prague is dark humor.

As much grief as Prague gets, once you accept that it's explicitly a Kafka pastiche, a dark humor tale of futility against the system, it works. Well, it worked for me. Not my favorite, but not altogether deserving of the derision thrown its way.

Even the original two-parters, like "Phantom Train of Doom" have different qualities in the first and second half, emphasizing different characters and relationships, and teaching Indy independent life lessons.
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Old 01-10-2010, 12:27 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by InexorableTash
As a warning, you'll probably enjoy a chronological watching more if you keep in mind two facets:

I was aware that there are problems with how the films were put together, and this was really apparent with the sudden ending of the first adventure, and in the next moment Corey has aged a few years. It was unsettling to see Corey growing older and younger within the same time frame.

The locations were amazing - apart from Russia with Tolstoy, where a lot of the buildings in the countryside were so obviosuly matte paintings. It stood out because the other episodes had so much attention to location.

I might have overdosed (watched too many in one go), as by China I was getting bored and using fast forward with the subtitles on. I was eager to get to the older Indy. However, when I did see the Edison episode with Flanery I was a bit disappointed. It seemed much sillier than any of the Corey episodes.

The Corey episodes were for the most part rivetting, not for their action, but for what there was to see in them - the attention to detail.

With Pancho Villa you can really start to see the character of the older Indiana Jones. I loved that episode - it's much more adult. Reminded me of Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch.

Lt. Patton with his twin pearl-handled .45s was a great scene, there was even a bit of Spaghetti western 'opera of the eyes' going on.

The character of Remy was introduced in an unusual manner - twice ready to kill Indy, and twice dissuaded.

I'm really looking forward to the war years.
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Old 01-12-2010, 03:59 PM   #48
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I found a really good video on YouTube.I love this video!

Young Indiana Jones DVDs: Action Montage
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Old 01-14-2010, 01:16 AM   #49
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Last night I was reading the Young Indy sections of Charles Champlin's book, George Lucas: The Creative Impulse (1992, revised & updated edition, 1997).

Whilst there are some gross inaccuracies in his description of the episodes, he did shed light on Lucas' creative process.

I knew that the Young Indy series was always intended to be educational, but I hadn't realized how far Lucas had been looking into the future with this project. Whilst this won't be news to many of you, it was new to me:

Champlin: "Lucas previously [prior to 1992] had founded the George Lucas Educational Foundation to explore and develop the possibilities of the videodisc combining text, sound, and both still and moving graphics, all at the user's command via the computer keyboard or mouse."

Lucas: "We were working on an idea called 'A Walk through Early-Twentieth-Century History with Indiana Jones,' and it turned into a television series."

Champlin: "Lucas was the executive producer of the project and generated all the basic stories. But the television format really was only the beginning of a bold three-stage evolution...These films will be available on video-tape as The Adventures of Indiana Jones As a Young Man."

Lucas filmed the Young Indy movies as the first stage of his grand project, knowing that he would have to wait for technological advances before the project could be completed.

Champlin: "Then, finally as the so-called DVD-format high-density discs with their great storage capacity become widely available, the movies will be further expanded into truly interactive, multimedia experiences - entertaining and painlessly educational."

Lucas: "It's all ten years ahead of its time, but I realized I had a chance to do part of it now, the biggest part of it. We'll add the rest when the new digital format is available. I don't consider anything ever really finished."

(That's two telling statements by Lucas: the DVD collections were ten years away (from the the date of the revised edition of Champlin's book), and Lucas doesn't "consider anything ever really finished", as evidenced by his tinkering with Star Wars).

Here are some facts and figures (or claims) about Young Indy from Champlin's book:

Rick McCallum: "We ended up shooting over 170 weeks - more than three years - on locations in twenty-five countries. It's the longest sustained period of shooting in the history of either film or television. We have 4 million feet of 16mm film; that's more than 750 miles worth, from New Guinea to Thailand to Greece, Russia, all of Europe, Turkey, North Africa, and Kenya."

Some of the films took more than three years to complete from first shot to last. The last of the shooting was completed in Morocco mid-1996.

Rick McCallum: "We were creating the world at the beginning of the twentieth-century and some of the effects didn't even play as effects. They involved painting out buildings and telephone wires..."

Lucas: "What we have are twenty-two feature films, done on a TV schedule, and that's what we set out to do. The films are very handsome, wth big action sequences, and they're all period. And the cost of each was under 4 million dollars. So we have twenty-two features done at a cost of one big movie feature today. They're now titled as movies; they'll play as movies."
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Old 01-19-2010, 02:40 PM   #50
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Can't believe I haven't posted in this thread yet...I think it's great that some Indy fans are beginning to appreciate the Young Indy series. Montana & Rocket (even Robyn and another Ravenhead, who wrote me privately) are getting interested. Whether the show bears the name "Indiana Jones" or not, it was still an excellent television show, regardless of its association with the films.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
With Pancho Villa you can really start to see the character of the older Indiana Jones. I loved that episode - it's much more adult. Reminded me of Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch.
The attack on "Ciudad Guerrero" is actually a COMPLETE rip-off of the film "Old Gringo" with Gregory Peck. (One day I'll post a side-by-side comparison and many Young Indy may be shocked/disappointed.) Check out this thread for more of same: References to other films/TV shows in YI.
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