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Old 08-09-2006, 04:20 PM   #51
roundshort
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A fine drink laddy . . .Irish Whiskey has really come into fashion latley. I have been watching the sales spike. A lot of interest in it since people are tired fo Scotch whisky, and the prices are getting crazy. I am still a Cognac man when it comes to brown liqours. Good Bourbon is always nice. The L&B guys are doing great things with Woodford Reserve, now that it isn't just Evan Williams anymore.
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Old 08-14-2006, 10:15 AM   #52
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'alo

Stopped by the park and rode PotC last night, and found the ride was just as unrewarding as the movie. The fog element was cool, but they had to remove the best part of the ride to create it. bah!

So to perk my spirits, I went to the Napa Rose for a glass of wine.

A glass of Fanucchi 2000 old vine Russian River zinfandal. Very nice.

I tasted the Murphy-Goode zin, as well. It was also a late harvest wine and I was mildly reminded of a port, so I opted for the Fanucchi glass instead.

I really enjoyed the deep red, almost purple color of the wine, it was a tart bouquet with bold hints of chocolate and an equally sharp acidic first taste. I noticed a blackberry and peppery flavors that Adam said would typically accompany a zin. (Juan and Mickey also chatted with thanatosis and I). The alcohol was there, but I found it subtle, and the flavor filled the whole tongue. It finished strong and lasted on the palate well after the wine was down. I would say this wine probably deserved some food or appetizer to compliment it; perhaps a peppercorn sirloin, or it might have even gone well with the Louisanna red pepper pork loin I grilled Saturday night.

I would have loved to stay for the petaluma rabbit, or maybe to share in the seven deadly sins over another glass or two with thanatosis, but as this was more of an assignment, and work this morning, only a glass.
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Old 08-14-2006, 12:10 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pale Horse
'alo

Stopped by the park and rode PotC last night, and found the ride was just as unrewarding as the movie. The fog element was cool, but they had to remove the best part of the ride to create it. bah!

So to perk my spirits, I went to the Napa Rose for a glass of wine.

A glass of Fanucchi 2000 old vine Russian River zinfandal. Very nice.

I tasted the Murphy-Goode zin, as well. It was also a late harvest wine and I was mildly reminded of a port, so I opted for the Fanucchi glass instead.

I really enjoyed the deep red, almost purple color of the wine, it was a tart bouquet with bold hints of chocolate and an equally sharp acidic first taste. I noticed a blackberry and peppery flavors that Adam said would typically accompany a zin. (Juan and Mickey also chatted with thanatosis and I). The alcohol was there, but I found it subtle, and the flavor filled the whole tongue. It finished strong and lasted on the palate well after the wine was down. I would say this wine probably deserved some food or appetizer to compliment it; perhaps a peppercorn sirloin, or it might have even gone well with the Louisanna red pepper pork loin I grilled Saturday night.

I would have loved to stay for the petaluma rabbit, or maybe to share in the seven deadly sins over another glass or two with thanatosis, but as this was more of an assignment, and work this morning, only a glass.


Sounds like a fun night. So you are getting the basics fo zin

Big red wine, medium high to high alcohol, low acid. Deeper blue/purple color. Fruti flavors of Blueberry, strawberry, blackberry. Usually hints of pepper or other spices. The wine can see oak (higher end wines) or no oak, (more affordable wines by the glass). I am partial to Howell Mountain as it often has a neat sandlewood, menthal chacterisitic to them, they do cost more, but worth it. Medium to long finnish. Goes better with larger foods, and can be drunk by iteslf. If you like zin, other good grapes to try are Primotivo from Southern Italy, central coast syrah, aussie shirazs.

For more old old types, southern rhone red blends, from Cotes du Rhone and Chateaneauf du Pape.

Keep up the good "work"
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Old 08-14-2006, 01:08 PM   #54
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A bit. Thanatosis and I want to catch a drink there at least once a month. A bit of a Sunday tradition, maybe. Adam was new and didn't know much more about the wines, then say: me.
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Old 08-14-2006, 01:27 PM   #55
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go a different direction, you've been drinking zin, one of the fruitest ofthe red grapes, now pick a grape that is a bit leaner, more acidic, red or white, what sounds interesting to you?
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Old 08-14-2006, 01:40 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roundshort
go a different direction, you've been drinking zin, one of the fruitest ofthe red grapes, now pick a grape that is a bit leaner, more acidic, red or white, what sounds interesting to you?


Not Pinot Grigio or Chardonnay. A white (so thanatosis and I can share).

Edit: Adding recipie

Something that would go with THIS
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Old 08-14-2006, 02:36 PM   #57
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hhmmmm southwestern Enchiladeas, well Cornoa is always a good choice . . .

but I would stay away from Chardonnay, and move towards whites that are off dry. With all the spice that is in that dish, it will over power a dry wine. Pinot grigo is a good option, and make sure it is northern Italy, and not from somewhere else. I would go for a German Riesling, maybe a QMp with some sweetness. Also a nice vouvray would be nice.
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Old 08-16-2006, 02:01 PM   #58
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Actually, Pale Horse and anyonelese who is interested inthis thread, I just was brought a new Zin, I have never had made by Dash, from Alexander Valley. It is a really really nice wine.

Deep dark purple almost garnet, pink to the rim, stained tears, nose of dried plums, smoke,fig,dried blueberry and strawberry, vanillia and mocha. Dried spices and fruit, medium intesity, slight tannin concentration good mouth feel, some length on finnish and medium plus concentration. It hink this will cost more than a Ravenswood, but well worth it in quailty. If you are a zin guy, check this one out. it ws the 2003 vintage.
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Old 08-16-2006, 03:48 PM   #59
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Wow, you guys are really good at this. I don't know #### about wine, except for Watching Sideways one night... and I definately identify more with Jack, than with Miles.

How do you get good at wine tasting? Able to differentiate scents/tastes? Don't like sounding like a newb, but is there a book to read? Coming from a little town in a dry country, my access to wine is very small.
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Old 08-16-2006, 04:02 PM   #60
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To be honest, and I have been working with wine for a long time, thee is only one question that is important

"Do you like it?"

A good sommeliers job is to be able to understand what a customer likes and dislikes and deliver it. Not every customer wants to discover new wines, so do. So only like wines in a professional (usually a guy named Robert Parker) rates it 90 points or better on a 100 point scale (What the hell is a point anyhow?).

I like wine and have been fortunate to be exposed to a lot of wine in a to of different counrties and places. It is only after many yeas of tasting and eating that I was able to discover my own palate,a nd have had a large chunk of the wines made around the world. The best thing to do is look for a wine tasting that has a lot of different wines for you to taste (do not forget to spit) then find one or two you like. Drive to a wet county, and buy a couple of types of wine that you liked. Enjoy them with food. Don't get to hung up on what food, etc. just have fun!
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Old 08-16-2006, 10:38 PM   #61
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Thanks roundshort... I guess somethings it's better to have first hand knowledge than to read a book.
There is a wine-tasting place about a days drive from where I live, I oughtta check it out one day.
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Old 08-17-2006, 12:13 PM   #62
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I am careful of suggesting books, because I really think the all most all make it sound to serious, it is a beverage, that gets you drunk, but there are some really fun ones for people who really want to learn about wine. For a true newbi, Michael Bonadies has a book called sip by sip. It is really well writeen, and not preachy. You can find it on amazon and buy it used for very little.
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Old 08-20-2006, 04:44 PM   #63
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Shorty, today I found out that I know absolutely nothing about wines.
I was at this wedding and I was talking with this girl about the wine.
And she says "You know this is not the best wine I ever tasted, actualy it is very bad"
I figured I might try it and see it for myself. I tasted it and it was good. Now this is by my standards. I thought for a second that she doesn't know much about wines and that she is wrong. Later conversation killed my theory.
I know nothing about wines.
What should I do? Am I a lost cause?
I figured I should chase after this girl untill she tells me the secret of the good wine. What do you think of this idea?
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Old 08-21-2006, 04:45 PM   #64
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Help!

What is acidity in wine?!?

How the heck to you describe it (especially when compared to tannins or alcohol)
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Old 08-22-2006, 01:10 AM   #65
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qwerty, trust me on this one, there is one important question in wine, do you like it period. Do not worry about what others like. To learn you have to drink it, and remember what you like and don't that is how you build

Pale, acid is the second most important thing in wine after fruit. acid is what makes wine and food work together. Look at the words most food friendly wines; Champagne, riesling, pinot noir, they are all high in acid. you can feel acid in a wine by how it makes you salavate. Good sauvignon blanc, Chablis, Champagne, Pinot Noir, sangieovase, Rielsing all have high acid.

Fruit = flacor
Tannin= structure/agabilty
acid= food compatabilty

this is the most basic aspect of flavor profile in wines.
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Old 08-22-2006, 10:27 AM   #66
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Roundshort what is the name of the wine you make?
Do you export it and where? How is the bussiness going?
a lot of questions, isn't it?
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Old 08-22-2006, 12:11 PM   #67
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That's where I got confused. I was doing well, tasting and all, then I read a book about pairing. (Wine with Food) and it talked about acidity. Right then my tongue lost all capability of what acid was. I pictured putting my tongue on a 9 volt battery.
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Old 08-22-2006, 04:50 PM   #68
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nothing like that Pale, more like food acid, in citrus etc.

In wine there are a few different types of acid Tartaric acid, Malic Acid, and Latic acid are the normal types of acid in wine. They all have a time and place in different types of wine.

qwerty I have worked on a bunch of different wines mainly in Burgundy and Napa, now I just work with one brand we produce about 6,000 cases a year and are in a lucky position to sell out very quickly. We export to London, Japan, China and to some resorts in the Islands (basicly where ever it is fun to go on vacation, we send the wine! It is wicked expensive stuff though. Fun to drink!
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Old 08-24-2006, 04:54 PM   #69
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I felt rather cultured before I read this thread. Now I feel like a Philistine. Thanks, roundshort.
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Old 08-24-2006, 05:00 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Savage
I felt rather cultured before I read this thread. Now I feel like a Philistine. Thanks, roundshort.

Hey I'm just a kid form the mean streets of Pittsburgh and a Jarhead! I just figured out that working with lux. products lets your "work" also be your pleasure also.


For the record, I listen to punk, watch football, and still find the wrong places to hangout with the wrong people!

Doc, I will always say this, "Drink and eat what you like, don't let anyone tell you other wise!" I will also say, eat and drink as much as you can!
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Old 08-24-2006, 05:15 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roundshort
In wine there are a few different types of acid Tartaric acid, Malic Acid, and Latic acid are the normal types of acid in wine. They all have a time and place in different types of wine.

You are the man for your time and place. . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by roundshort
Hey I'm just a kid form the mean streets of Pittsburgh and a Jarhead! I just figured out that working with lux. products lets your "work" also be your pleasure also.

Question: "Mr. Murphy, what attracts you to the leisure industry?"
Spud: "In a word: pleasure. It's like, my pleasure in other people's leisure."

Whoops, doubly wrong thread.
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Old 08-24-2006, 05:26 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Brody
You are the man for your time and place. . . .



Question: "Mr. Murphy, what attracts you to the leisure industry?"
Spud: "In a word: pleasure. It's like, my pleasure in other people's leisure."

Whoops, doubly wrong thread.

what can I say, the Dude Abides!

YOU ARE ON FIRE JOEY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
"No, Actually I went to Craignewton but I was worried that you wouldn't have heard of it so I put the Royal Edinburgh College instead, because they're both schools, right, and we're all in this together, and I wanted to put across the general idea rather than the details, yeah? People get all hung up on details, but what's the point? Like which school? Does it matter? Why? When? Where? Or how many O grades did I get? Could be six, could be one, but that's not important. What's important is that I am, right? That I am.

"Mr. Murphy, do you mean you lied on your application?"

"Only to get my foot inthe door. Showing initiative, right?

"You were referred here by the department of Employment. There's no need for you to get your "fut in the door", as you put it.
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Old 09-06-2006, 12:46 PM   #73
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Well Pale Horse asked about one of my favorite AVA (American Vitacultural Area, much like the AOC, DOC, GI, etc etc) Napa Valley, America's greatest wine making region, and the first truley great wine region in the "new world" has 14 sub regions, or AVA's in it.

Spring Mountain is one of them. It is the Steepest and wettest (although still allmost bone dry by other countires definations of rain fall). It gets its name for the many natural springs that are found in it. It is loacted from 600 to 2,600 feet above sea level in the Mayacamas Mountain range. it is a mixture of Volcanic and Sedimentery soils, which gives way to red wines that have deep color, a lot of soft tannin, lower acidity (highwer Ph), fat rich flavors. Whites can be fat to lean depending on the soils they are planted in. Originally know for their whites, this has changed int he past 20 years to one of the best areas for red wines in Napa. With Wineries like Pride, Barnett, Fisher, Cain, Marston, it is easy to see why.
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Old 10-17-2006, 05:44 PM   #74
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Lightbulb Shirazz! and Coonawarra Chardonnay

Quote:
Originally Posted by roundshort
Good sauvignon blanc, Chablis, Champagne, Pinot Noir, sangieovase, Rielsing all have high acid.

Fruit = flacor
Tannin= structure/agabilty
acid= food compatabilty

this is the most basic aspect of flavor profile in wines.

I like Riesling wines too ! I heard the grapes are collected during cold seasons so that the dew is still holding onto the grapes' exterior and it gets pressed altogether - therefore the fine fresh taste.

Thanks for the details - guys we've got ourselves a connaisseur here. Hats of to ya Roundshort!

Anyways, has anyone ever drank a Shiraz??
I used to use that word for about a year or so, kinda pronounced it like a semi-Arabic sort of dirty word (don't ask me what the hell I occupy myself with sometimes), but I learnt a few weeks ago that this is actually a specific grape varient (A.O.C.) used extensively... (what an old Microsoft Wines encyclopaedia cd from '96 is good for sometimes...)
I had a great laugh over it because I used to be a little interested wine... must've picked up that funny name in my subconsciousness...

A very sweet dessert wine I drink occasionally is Montbazillac.
I think the best wine I ever drank was in Austria, a nice sparkling goldcoloured Australian Chardonnay - Coonawarra range... Gotta find a bottle of those sometime - hell I'd buy a crate full of them!
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Old 12-05-2006, 10:46 PM   #75
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I spent much of fall gathering endorsements from local winery owners, to help elect a fellow grower who will soon represent Lodi. Chasing these guys during harvest took patience, and there was no time to taste! (There has been much toasting since.) I learned is 7 Deadly Zins is a cool name for a wine.
Speaking of climate, I found this illustration amusing:

That's Napa in the background. Still a better place to visit. The only B&B I know around here has a view of a city park.
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