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Old 07-12-2012, 11:28 AM   #76
Nurhachi1991
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This is a great adventure novel.

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Old 10-18-2012, 02:29 AM   #77
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Originally Posted by WilliamBoyd8
I just finished reading The Road to Samarcand by Patrick O'Brian.

I have been gradually assembling the complete Aubrey-Maturin series over the past few months. Often referred to by the first title in the cycle, the Master & Commander cycle was a series of 20-novels featuring the naval exploits of Captain "Lucky" Jack Aubrey throughout the Napoleonic Era. Good reading for those of you who can absorb a bevy of period detail. The lifelong debate between the twin leads underscores the duality of man.

While picking up the ninth & tenth book in the series, I found a copy of another one of O'Brian's unknown works, Hussein. From the description, it should be right up our regular's alley!

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Originally Posted by Book Jacket
As a boy, Hussein falls in love with a beautiful and elusive girl, Sashiya, and arranges for another of her suitors to be murdered with a fakir's curse. The dead man's relatives vow vengeance. Hussein escapes and his adventures begin: snake-charming, sword-fighting, spying, stealing a fortune, and returning triumphantly to claim his bride. All of this is set against an evocatively exotic India, full of bazaars, temples, and beautiful women despite the fact that O'Brian had never been to the East when he wrote the story

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Old 10-18-2012, 04:40 AM   #78
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O'Brian had never been to the East when he wrote the story
As much becomes evident simply by reading that description. So much cultural clichés packed together, and very likely a common misconception or two as well.

For the record though, this was not a complaint but merely an observation. Those are, after all, very often the norm when creating some pulpy, adventurous fun. All the more power to those who can avoid said pitfalls, but a lot of jolly fun stories would have been untold as well, had the author not taken a bunch of liberties.

Still, worth noting, considering they're rarely made this evident in what is supposed to be the pitch.
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Old 03-01-2013, 06:24 AM   #79
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Two more authors that you might like to try are Will Adams ("The Alexander Cipher", "The Exodus Quest", "the Lost Labyrinth") and James Rollins ("Map Of Bones", "Subterranean" etc) (There are several more of his, but I won't list them all here). If your taste runs to genuine "pulp era" adventure novels (written in the 1920's) then you might try Talbot Mundy's "Jimgrim" novels.
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Old 03-01-2013, 06:28 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by adventure_al
Recently looking for authors of adventure books in addition to Clive Cussler to pad out my reading material.

James Rollins sounds interesting, he was involved with KOTCS. He contributed the good bits before Lucas botched it up with his nonsense (i'd imagine! :P)

Anyone read his books? Excavation and Sandstorm sound particularly good.

Also Matthew Reilly is well known for his fast paced adventure novels. As an aside he also own the actual golden idol prop from Raiders.

Seven Ancient Wonders feat. Jack West looks good. Can anyone confirm?

Also if this sounds good I'd strongly recommend Cussler's 'Inca Gold' and 'Serpent'.
Geez I didn't even read your first post properly ! I.ve only read "Subterranean" so far, but I enjoyed it.
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Old 03-01-2013, 06:34 AM   #81
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Originally Posted by Indy Scout 117
yeah i wanted to see that movie. is there a book about it or is it just a movie??
There was a "novelization" done of the movie. Personally I enjoyed the original T V series but hated the movie with Will Smith !
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Old 03-01-2013, 06:37 AM   #82
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Another writer to mention is Steve Berry, although his stuff reads more like Dan Brown to me, but with a Russian theme (at least in the first two books I read, "The Amber Room" and "The Romanov Prophecy")
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Old 03-01-2013, 06:41 AM   #83
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Of course, if your taste runs to crystal skulls there are two books with similar titles "The Crystal Skull" by Manda Scott and "Crystal Skull" by Rob MacGregor (who also wrote some Indiana Jones novels).
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:24 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by adventure_al


Just finished this. Thoroughly enjoyed it! Coincidently it was the first in a series. I plan to read them all. Would definately recommend giving it a go.

Excellent series of books. Seeing you mention them has made me want to read them again!

Another one I read a few years back is "The Source" by Michael Cordy. Very good adventure novel from what i can remember. Might be worth a try.

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Old 03-01-2013, 10:20 AM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otto rahn
Two more authors that you might like to try are Will Adams ("The Alexander Cipher", "The Exodus Quest", "the Lost Labyrinth") and James Rollins ("Map Of Bones", "Subterranean" etc) (There are several more of his, but I won't list them all here). If your taste runs to genuine "pulp era" adventure novels (written in the 1920's) then you might try Talbot Mundy's "Jimgrim" novels.

Will Adams is alright--a little bland in his writing, but his material is at the very least more grounded than Clive Cussler's stuff. I think I've only read The Alexander Cipher, though I've possibly read The Exodus Quest but have entirely forgotten about it. Even though I'm not really impressed with his novels, I feel compelled to cheer for him since at the very least he tries to add a bit of historicity to his writing, a crippling issue in most adventure fiction these days.

James Rollins, on the other hand, is an airport bookstore-level hack (in my opinion, of course). Mind you, I've only attempted to read "Sandstorm", and I haven't the slightest idea where that ranks amongst his other works, but the 30-40 pages of "Sandstorm" I read were painful. Terrible writing, terrible character names ("Omaha Dunn," for example), terrible plot. What little I've read of Wilbur Smith is just about as headache-inducing.

Adventure novels I would recommend is not exactly in the realm of Indiana Jones-ish fiction, since most of that is either Clive Cussler or Dan Brown-esque stuff that, well, isn't very good. That said, Romolo Gessi's "Seven Years in the Soudan" and especially Winston Churchill's "The River War" are fascinating nonfiction accounts, and amongst fiction you really can't go wrong with anything by Umberto Eco. I definitely suggest "Name of the Rose," "Baudolino," or "Foucault's Pendulum." Michael Crichton's "Congo" was alright, as I recall. Daniel Leston's "The Amun Chamber" reminds me of Will Adams, being a bit bland but not offensive or irritating.

I've been meaning to finally read some Patrick O'Brien, and "Road to Samarcand" sound intriguing.
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:01 AM   #86
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Several months ago, I read some of Steve Berry's books, which I found to be pretty good adventure stories, more similar to the movies' James Bond than Indiana Jones.

They are set in the modern era.

I read these books:

The Amber Room
The Romanov Prophecy
The Third Secret

The Third Secret is set in and around the Vatican.
The "secret" was quite humorous, given current events.

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Old 01-01-2016, 06:41 PM   #87
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Not fiction but the work of Henning Haslund ("Men and Gods In Mongolia" and "In Secret Mongolia")available from "Adventures Unlimited Press" are about exploration in Mongolia in the 1920's and 30's and may provide background/and or inspiration.
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Old 10-16-2017, 12:28 PM   #88
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Dig The bones of this thread have been brought back to life

So, since 2009, there are a ton of new action/adventure books, which certainly seem to follow the Indy tradition. Here are a few. (And no, Dan Brown isn't listed.)

The Bones Of Odin (1st of the 14-book Matt Drake series) by David Leadbeater. http://amzn.to/2xJjNbR

The Sean Wyatt Series by Ernest Dempsey http://amzn.to/2xJdtBm

The Genesis Conspiracy by James Prescott http://amzn.to/2zcMXkE

Shadows of the Stone Benders by Patrick Donoghue http://amzn.to/2xIR7zU
^^ This one is really, really good.

Plenty of material for the adventure reader.
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