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Old 10-31-2017, 03:24 AM   #1
Raiders112390
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Does anyone find the 1910s more interesting than the 1930s?

So, re-watching LC got me thinking...
Indiana Jones is set in the 1930s for the most part, but you have that one segment set in 1912. I have to say - maybe it was the setting, or maybe it was the Hardy Boys-esque feel of it - but a part of me wishes we had an adventure series set in the 1900-1914 Era prior to WWII. There is a lot of nostalgia for the 1930s because of things like the birth of cinema, Art Deco, the car design, all the great stars, etc, but as I get older the 1930s - though still long ago - feel too modern to be interesting or intriguing.

The 1910s, before WWI, seem like a totally different world. Cars were relatively new. Flight was utterly new. There was no such thing as commercial flight. Cinema was still in its infancy. The world of the 1910s seems a much larger place than it does in the 1930s, and as such, more intriguing.

Anyone agree?
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Old 10-31-2017, 06:12 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
Does anyone find the 1910s more interesting than the 1930s?
Yes, I do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
There is a lot of nostalgia for the 1930s because of things like the birth of cinema,...
---
The 1910s, before WWI, seem like a totally different world...Cinema was still in its infancy.
Cinema was in its infancy before it was born?!?
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Old 10-31-2017, 01:09 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
So, re-watching LC got me thinking...
Indiana Jones is set in the 1930s for the most part, but you have that one segment set in 1912. I have to say - maybe it was the setting, or maybe it was the Hardy Boys-esque feel of it - but a part of me wishes we had an adventure series set in the 1900-1914 Era prior to WWII.
1900

The Grail Diary: Western Massachusetts—August 24

1905

The Grail Diary: Las Mesas, Colorado—November 14

1906

The Grail Diary: Auberge d’Ecume, Cantanez, France—July 8

The Grail Diary: Gasthof Trubselig, Klasen heim, Austria-Hungary—July 16

1908

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: April, 1908—April

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: Letter from Anna Jones to Indy—April 16

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: My First Adventure (Egypt portion)—May
_____The Mummy’s Curse (Stine)
_____The Valley of the Kings
_____The Mummy’s Curse (Parker Smith)
_____The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (comic) #1: Egypt, May 1908
_____Young Indiana Jones in the Curse of Kha
_____ジャッカルの呪い(Japanese adaptation 1) (Toshiki Taguchi)
_____Der Fluch der Mumie (Part 1) (1908 portion) (audio drama)

Interactive Timeline (DVD): May 1908—May

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: Letter from Ned to Indy—May 9

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: May 10, 1908—May 10

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: Passion for Life (Paris portion)—September
_____Masters of the Louvre

Interactive Timeline (DVD): September 1908—September

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: The Perils of Cupid—November
_____The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (comic) #9: Vienna, November 1908/March 1917 (1908 portion)
_____初恋のウィーン(Japanese adaptation 6) (Mora****a Kazuhito)

Interactive Timeline (DVD): September 1909 (Vienna entry)—November

Interactive Timeline (DVD): September 1908 (Florence entry)—November

1909

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: Passion for Life (British East Africa portion)—September
_____Safari Sleuth
_____African Safari
_____The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (comic) #3-4: British East Africa, September 1909
_____Safari in Africa (Sally Bell)
_____サバンナの探偵 (Japanese adaptation 13) (Hiroki Murakama)
_____Schüsse im Garten Eden. Britisch-Ostafrika 1909 (Mike F. Thompson)
_____Schüsse im Garten Eden (1909 portion) (audio drama)

Interactive Timeline (DVD): September 1909 (British East Africa entry)—September

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: September 15, 1909—September 15

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: My First Adventure (Tangiers portion)—October

Grail Diary: Muhammad Ali al-Jawf, Museum of Islam, Baghdad, Iraq—November 14

1910

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: Journey of Radiance—January to March
_____Die Nadeln des Dr. Wen Chiu. Indien und China 1910 (Mike F. Thompson)
_____Behind the Great Wall
_____The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (comic) #11-12: Peking, March 1910
_____東洋の秘術 (Japanese adaptation 9) (Yokota)

Interactive Timeline (DVD): January 1910—January

Indiana Jones—Magic & Mysticism: The Dark Continent: Magic & Mysticism: the Dark Continent (5-10, 20-23, 34-38, 62-63)—February 27 to sometime in 1911

Tales of the Shadowmen, vol. 9: La Vie en Noir: Professor Peaslee Plays Paris (Near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River)—March 6

Interactive Timeline (DVD): March 1910—March

The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles Magazine #1: Indy in China: The Runaway Adventure—March

The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: Travels with Father—April to May

Interactive Timeline (DVD): August 1910—April

Interactive Timeline (DVD): September 1910—May

1911

Tales of the Shadowmen, vol. 9: La Vie en Noir: Professor Peaslee Plays Paris (1911 portions)—August 22-27

1912

Grail Diary: Telegramma—February 21

Grail Diary: Las Mesas, Colorado—February 22

Young Indiana Jones and the Titanic Adventure—April 8 to 15

Young Indiana Jones and the Pirates’ Loot—April

Grail Diary: Las Mesas—May 22

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: June 8, 1912—June 8

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: August 1, 1912—August 1

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion)—August
_____Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion) (MacGregor)
_____Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion) (Windham)
_____Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion) (Les Martin)
_____Indiana Jones et la Dernière Croisade (1912 portion) (Jerome Jacobs)
_____Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion) (Anne Digby)
_____Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion) (Read-Along Adventure)
_____Indiana Jones Annual 2010: Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1912 portion)
_____Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (issue 1: 1912 portion) (Marvel)
_____The Greatest Adventures of Indiana Jones: Young Indiana Jones and the Cross of Coronado

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade Facebook Diary: August 5, 1912—August 5

The Lost Journal of Indiana Jones: August 5, 1912—August 5

Indiana Jones Jr. et le Fantôme du Klondike—August (internal date now overwritten)

Young Indiana Jones and the Lost Gold of Durango—October

Indiana Jones Jr. et l’Ampoule Radioactive—November

1913

Indiana Jones Jr. et le Météorite Sacrée—March

Young Indiana Jones and the Mountains of Superstition—March

Young Indiana Jones and the Plantation Treasure (main 1913 portion)—April
_____Young Indiana Jones and the Plantation Treasure (comic strip)

Young Indiana Jones and the Tomb of Terror—June

Young Indiana Jones and the Princess of Peril—July
_____Young Indiana Jones and the Princess of Peril (comic strip)

Indiana Jones Jr. et l’Enfant Lama—August

Indiana Jones Jr. et le Violon du Metropolitan—September

Indiana Jones Jr. et le Triangle des Bermudes—September

Young Indiana Jones and the Ghostly Riders—October

Young Indiana Jones and the Circle of Death—December

1914

Young Indiana Jones and the Journey to the Underworld—January

Young Indiana Jones and the Curse of the Ruby Cross—March

Young Indiana Jones and the Gypsy Revenge—May

Young Indiana Jones and the Secret City—June 24 to 30

Young Indiana Jones and the Mountain of Fire—October

Young Indiana Jones and the Face of the Dragon—November 4 to 6

Young Indiana Jones and the Eye of the Tiger—December

1915

Indiana Jones Jr. et le Spectre de Venise—January

Grail Diary: “Clipped from the Celtic Scholar…”—May 7

The Greatest Adventures of Indiana Jones: 128 American Citizens Perish in U-Boat Attack—May 8
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Old 11-01-2017, 03:27 AM   #4
Raiders112390
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Yes, I do.

Cinema was in its infancy before it was born?!?

The first permanent movie theater was opened in 1905. Movies were shown in exhibitions and such going back to the 1890s. The first feature length film was released in 1906. The technology was there but it was in its infancy.
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Old 11-01-2017, 03:29 AM   #5
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a guy

The first successful permanent theatre showing only films was "The Nickelodeon", which was opened in Pittsburgh in 1905. By then there were enough films several minutes long available to fill a programme running for at least half an hour, and which could be changed weekly when the local audience became bored with it. Other exhibitors in the United States quickly followed suit, and within a couple of years there were thousands of these nickelodeons in operation. The American experience led to a worldwide boom in the production and exhibition of films from 1906 onwards.

By 1907 purpose-built cinemas for motion pictures were being opened across the United States, Britain and France. The films were often shown with the accompaniment of music provided by a pianist, though there could be more musicians. There were also a very few larger cinemas in some of the biggest cities. Initially, the majority of films in the programmes were Pathé films, but this changed fairly quickly as the American companies cranked up production. The programme was made up of just a few films, and the show lasted around 30 minutes. The reel of film, of maximum length 1,000 feet (300 m), which usually contained one individual film, became the standard unit of film production and exhibition in this period. The programme was changed twice or more a week, but went up to five changes of programme a week after a couple of years. In general, cinemas were set up in the established entertainment districts of the cities. In 1907, Pathé began renting their films to cinemas through film exchanges rather than selling the films outright.
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Old 11-01-2017, 04:11 PM   #6
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People in general are more familiar with the 1930s than they are the decades before. I'd love to see more films set around the turn of the century, as there's plenty of history and culture there to explore, including the world of Indy.
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Old 11-02-2017, 04:34 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
There is a lot of nostalgia for the 1930s because of things like the birth of cinema...


I doubt Tom Joad is nostalgic for the thirties.

I would argue that you're externalizing aspects of the thirties when the real lasting appeal of the decade (and the forties) is the indelible mark the events have left on the national character; a series of events that Europe in particular had already gone through following Dubya Dubya One.

That said, The Gilded Age is indeed a fascinating time period. It's a time of great social and political upheaval the world over.

Examples: In China the Jūnfá shídài or Warlord Era is going on;

Karl Marx has recently published Das Kapital.

The British have assumed control of the Khedive of Egypt.

The Russo-Japanese War earns TR the Nobel Peace Prize.

I could go on, but that's more than enough. Young Indiana Jones touched on a lot of the periphery of these events, but given his age, remain superficial. You really need an adult to go through the events of the era.

Also of note: It was also a time of an expression of national/tribal character through dress. The Turks, for example, weren't wearing tee shirts and pointy shoes.
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:01 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
The first permanent movie theater was opened in 1905. Movies were shown in exhibitions and such going back to the 1890s. The first feature length film was released in 1906. The technology was there but it was in its infancy.

---
The first successful permanent theatre showing only films was "The Nickelodeon", which was opened in Pittsburgh in 1905...
(+ 2 paragraphs of plagiarism).
Film history is a passion of mine so there’s no need for the lesson.

Anyway, you’re entirely missing the point. You say that the 1930s were the “birth of cinema” when it was actually 1895 with the Lumière brothers (in Paris, mind you, not Pittsburgh ) where multiple people saw the same film at the same time. This is a universally known fact. Infancy before birth? A baby has to be born before it’s an infant, dude.

Plus, if you’re going to quote Wikipedia, then it’s wise to give acknowledgement rather than passing the words off as your own.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Le Saboteur
It's a time of great social and political upheaval the world over.
Indeed but, unfortunately, Raiders112390’s scope of the 20th century never extends beyond U.S. borders.
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Old 11-02-2017, 05:26 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Film history is a passion of mine so there’s no need for the lesson.

Anyway, you’re entirely missing the point. You say that the 1930s were the “birth of cinema” when it was actually 1895 with the Lumière brothers (in Paris, mind you, not Pittsburgh ) where multiple people saw the same film at the same time. This is a universally known fact. Infancy before birth? A baby has to be born before it’s an infant, dude.

Plus, if you’re going to quote Wikipedia, then it’s wise to give acknowledgement rather than passing the words off as your own.

Indeed but, unfortunately, Raiders112390’s scope of the 20th century never extends beyond U.S. borders.

I said the 1910s were when cinema was in its infancy:
"The 1910s, before WWI, seem like a totally different world. Cars were relatively new. Flight was utterly new. There was no such thing as commercial flight. Cinema was still in its infancy. The world of the 1910s seems a much larger place than it does in the 1930s, and as such, more intriguing."

Cinema as you note was invented in 1895. But it was still in its infancy in the 1910s. It wasn't the big machine that it had already become by the 1930s. That was all my comment was meant to convey. It was simply meant to further my sentiment that the world seemed like a bigger place in the first decade of the 20th century. My point is that the 1900-1913 era is to me a fascinating mix of the Old World and the birth of the Modern world and as such would make for an interesting time to explore in adventure films.

Actually I know quite a bit about 20th century history beyond America's borders. The Edwardian era is interesting to me all over the planet. Hence the thread.
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Old 11-02-2017, 05:32 PM   #10
Raiders112390
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Le Saboteur
I doubt Tom Joad is nostalgic for the thirties.

I would argue that you're externalizing aspects of the thirties when the real lasting appeal of the decade (and the forties) is the indelible mark the events have left on the national character; a series of events that Europe in particular had already gone through following Dubya Dubya One.

That said, The Gilded Age is indeed a fascinating time period. It's a time of great social and political upheaval the world over.

Examples: In China the Jūnfá shídài or Warlord Era is going on;

Karl Marx has recently published Das Kapital.

The British have assumed control of the Khedive of Egypt.

The Russo-Japanese War earns TR the Nobel Peace Prize.

I could go on, but that's more than enough. Young Indiana Jones touched on a lot of the periphery of these events, but given his age, remain superficial. You really need an adult to go through the events of the era.

Also of note: It was also a time of an expression of national/tribal character through dress. The Turks, for example, weren't wearing tee shirts and pointy shoes.

It's of interest to me because this is an era where you have (primitive) cars, primitive telephones, but you also have centuries old Empires still existing in Europe and the Near-East. You have this intense, as you note, tribal sentiment in many areas of the world (which in part led to the assassination of the Archduke). You still have areas of the Western World that are under absolute monarchies. You have a Europe which is governed in essence by one big family. There's a powder-keg in Europe. The United States is this relatively young nation that is still recovering from the wounds of a Civil War and attempting to make its mark on the world, but it's perhaps a 2nd or 3rd rate power prior to WWI.

Vast areas of the world are utterly unexplored because there are no major airplanes, no satellites, nothing which can document every nook and cranny. The horse and buggy hasn't gone totally out of fashion yet. There's intrigue, anxiety, and restlessness brimming all over the world

In such an era, an adult Indy-esque character would be fascinating to see.
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Old 11-03-2017, 11:31 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
I said the 1910s were when cinema was in its infancy:
---
Cinema as you note was invented in 1895. But it was still in its infancy in the 1910s.
Yes, but you also said that its “birth” was in the 1930s. “Invented” = Born. Jeeze Louise, quit with the dodgeball game.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
It was simply meant to further my sentiment that the world seemed like a bigger place in the first decade of the 20th century.
Erm, don't you mean the 2nd decade? We're talking about the 1910s, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
My point is that the 1900-1913 era is to me a fascinating mix of the Old World and the birth of the Modern world and as such would make for an interesting time to explore in adventure films.
For sure…but it’s not an untapped era in movieland. Plenty have already been made. I collect adventure films set during that 'turn-of-the-century' time period and have tonnes & tonnes of ‘em! (Although my focus is mainly late Victorian.) Are you looking for recommendations?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiders112390
Actually I know quite a bit about 20th century history beyond America's borders.
It certainly doesn’t show in your numerous other threads about the 1950s and ‘60s.
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Old 11-03-2017, 01:07 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Stoo
Yes, but you also said that its “birth” was in the 1930s. “Invented” = Born. Jeeze Louise, quit with the dodgeball game.

Erm, don't you mean the 2nd decade? We're talking about the 1910s, right?

For sure…but it’s not an untapped era in movieland. Plenty have already been made. I collect adventure films set during that 'turn-of-the-century' time period and have tonnes & tonnes of ‘em! (Although my focus is mainly late Victorian.) Are you looking for recommendations?

It certainly doesn’t show in your numerous other threads about the 1950s and ‘60s.

I'll refine my commnt about the "birth of cinema in the 30s" to better convey my intent. The 1930s are known as the start of the Golden Era in Hollywood by some. You had celebrity actors and actresses prior to this, but, the 1930s were the age of Clark Gable, of William Powell, of Carole Lombard, etc, the 1930s cemented cinema as a major form of mass media rather than a novelty or merely an art form. It was a different world already within twenty years. People used cinema in the 1930s to escape the harshness of reality. Compared with the relative prosperity of the 1920s.

That's what I meant. That Cinema was literally born in the 1930s but the concepts of the actor/superstar and the actor/actress as fashion icon or social icon were greatly shaped then.

It was just to juxtapose the world the Edwardian pre-WWI Era from the post WWI era as I feel WWI changed everything.

And sure, there have been movies set during these periods but nothing with feel of Indy. Nothing with an utterly mysterious rag tag group of mercenaries like the ones Indy encountered in 1912. I've said before, I wish dearly to have been able to have had an "Adventures of Fedora" spinoff.
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