TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > Off Topic > Open Discussion
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-14-2009, 02:47 AM   #26
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,617
What about Captain W.E. Johns' Biggles novels? The classic British hero who had wartime and peacetime adventures all over the world.

My dad was a big fan of Biggles from a young age, and he still had some of his old books. If he hadn't encouraged me to read them, I would have done so anyway, just from the looking at the great artwork on the dust jackets!
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2009, 06:27 AM   #27
Le Saboteur
IndyFan
 
Le Saboteur's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sham Shui Po
Posts: 1,924
We should also add Frank Buck's stories collected in Bring 'em Back Alive! Yes, it's the source material for the tv show of the same name.

A couple more:

Death in the Dark Continent by Peter H. Capstick. In fact, all of his books are good reads.
The Man-eaters of Tsavo by John Henry Patterson
The Man-eaters of Kuamon by Jim Corbett
Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa's Greatest Explorer by Tim Jeal


Collectively non-fiction, but they're all rousing reads.
Le Saboteur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2009, 06:28 PM   #28
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
Just to let you all know I finished Inca Gold and have powered through alot of Cusslers other adventure novels. They are the 'popcorn movies' of reading. Adventures very inkeeping with the indy style.

Inca Gold has so far been one of my favs but all the Dirk Pitt and Kurt Austin stories from the 'NUMA files' are great fun.
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2009, 10:04 AM   #29
Col. Detritch
IndyFan
 
Col. Detritch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Tanis Dig
Posts: 339
Matthew Reilly is very tallented at adventure, very gripping!

I'm not sure if this counts but Ian Fleming's James Bond. They are more an espionage series but Live and Let Die, just to name one, had a fair amount of adventure in it- Bloody Morgan's Treasure, Bloody Morgan's Island. And it had action scenes that could fit into Indy like a warehouse showdown and being dragged across the coral reefs!

Plus it's a must read for Indy fans because Bond created Indy in a way!
Col. Detritch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2010, 05:12 AM   #30
Le Saboteur
IndyFan
 
Le Saboteur's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sham Shui Po
Posts: 1,924
I was rearranging my library earlier, and came across a few books that I felt should be on this list. While most know of Bartle Bull's Africa Trilogy -- A Cafe on the Nile, White Rhino Hotel, The Devil's Oasis -- he started a second trilogy (?) that bears mentioning.

Shanghai Station sees Alexander Karlov, the only son of the noble soldier, Count Karlov, helping his mother and sister flee the Russian Revolution and escaping across the country via the Trans-Siberian Railroad. From Vladivostok he heads to Shanghai where his father is fighting the Communists. The train is attacked, and Alexander helps fight off the attackers, but is wounded in the fight. Friends and foes abound in Shanghai, and adventures are to be had!

The action picks up again in China Star. Picking up again in Paris four years later, with Alexander searching for his sister, the plot whisks along from Paris to Cairo to Ceylon and finally to Shanghai! There's plenty of two-fisted action and derring do to whet the appetite of any Indy fan.

There are two other books I'd like to add to this list as well. The first is Safari: A Chronicle of Adventure. Also written by Mr. Bull, he quite comprehensively covers the history of the safari from its earliest days right up through the glory years of the early 20th Century. It's definitely worth picking up.

Bartle B. Bull is the son of Bartle Bull, and makes his living as a journalist and author. While primarily known for his articles on the Middle East and foreign affairs, he has penned an intriguing account of his exploration of Mongolia's Lake Baikal, Around the Sacred Sea: Mongolia and Lake Baikal on Horseback.

Douglas Preston is half of the writing team behind Relic, Reliquary, and Riptide among others, he has penned several books on his own. The Codex is the closest of them all to Indy, but Tyrannosaur Canyon and The Royal Road - El Camino Real from Mexico City to Santa Fe are equally intriguing.

Le Saboteur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 05:13 AM   #31
inky_skin
IndyFan
 
inky_skin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Devon, UK
Posts: 830
- The Captain Alatriste Series by Arturo Pérez-Reverte
- The Flashman Series by George MacDonald Fraser
inky_skin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 06:35 PM   #32
Le Saboteur
IndyFan
 
Le Saboteur's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sham Shui Po
Posts: 1,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by inky_skin
- The Captain Alatriste Series by Arturo Pérez-Reverte

Seconded. Anything Senor Perez-Reverte has written is worth picking up, but these are definitely quality. For those of you who haven't read them, you can think of it like a Spanish version of The Three Musketeers. Originally published in Spain over a decade (?) ago, they're finally being released here. The newest, Pirates of the Levant, will be published this September. This should be plenty of time to finish the first novel, Captain Alatriste.

*Our European friends might be pleased to know of a movie version of the series featuring Viggo Mortenson as the eponymous Alatriste. Having never seen it, I can't recommend it. However, Viggo does the entire thing in Spanish. That alone makes it worth picking up.

Somebody mentioned Michael Chabon earlier in this thread, and I've been meaning to mention: Gentlemen of the Road. It's a rather slim novel compared to his other works, but it's a classic tale of adventure that recreates 10th-century Khazaria, the fabled kingdom of wild red-haired Jews on the western shore of the Caspian Sea, in this sprightly historical adventure. Zelikman and Amram, respectively a gawky Frank and a gigantic Abyssinian, make their living by means of confidence tricks, doctoring, bodyguarding and the occasional bit of skullduggery along the Silk Road. The unlikely duo find themselves caught up in larger events when they befriend Filaq, the headstrong and unlikable heir to the recently deposed war king of the Khazars. Their attempts to restore Filaq to the throne make for a terrifically entertaining modern pulp adventure replete with marauding armies, drunken Vikings, beautiful prostitutes, rampaging elephants and mildly telegraphed plot points that aren't as they seem. Chabon has a wonderful time writing intentionally purple prose and playing with conventions that were most popular in the days of Rudyard Kipling and Talbot Mundy.

I also wanted to recommend that everybody find a copy of Norman Sherry's Conrad's Eastern World & Conrad's Western World. By themselves they're a testament to the largesse of Conrad's imagination. They equally shine as pieces of literary detective work. Sherry exhaustively researches Conrad's life, and how the "active years" as a British merchant seaman contributed to his fiction.
Le Saboteur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 09:22 AM   #33
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
Adventure Novel recommendations

Recently looking for authors of adventure books in addition to Clive Cussler to pad out my reading material.

James Rollins sounds interesting, he was involved with KOTCS. He contributed the good bits before Lucas botched it up with his nonsense (i'd imagine! :P)

Anyone read his books? Excavation and Sandstorm sound particularly good.

Also Matthew Reilly is well known for his fast paced adventure novels. As an aside he also own the actual golden idol prop from Raiders.

Seven Ancient Wonders feat. Jack West looks good. Can anyone confirm?

Also if this sounds good I'd strongly recommend Cussler's 'Inca Gold' and 'Serpent'.
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 09:59 AM   #34
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_al
Recently looking for authors of adventure books in addition to Clive Cussler to pad out my reading material.

James Rollins sounds interesting, he was involved with KOTCS. He contributed the good bits before Lucas botched it up with his nonsense (i'd imagine! :P)

Anyone read his books? Excavation and Sandstorm sound particularly good.

Also Matthew Reilly is well known for his fast paced adventure novels. As an aside he also own the actual golden idol prop from Raiders.

Seven Ancient Wonders feat. Jack West looks good. Can anyone confirm?

Also if this sounds good I'd strongly recommend Cussler's 'Inca Gold' and 'Serpent'.

Rollins' novelization of KOTCS is very good - it reads better than the film plays.

Wilbur Smith wrote cracking adventure stories, and I've been meaning to go back a re-read them again.
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 10:08 AM   #35
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
Rollins' novelization of KOTCS is very good - it reads better than the film plays.

Yes I believe he was commissioned to contribute to KOTCS script so I imagine it would before Lucas and co got their paws on it.

Are there any particular titles you would recommend from W.Smith?
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 10:15 AM   #36
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_al
Yes I believe he was commissioned to contribute to KOTCS script so I imagine it would before Lucas and co got their paws on it.

Are there any particular titles you would recommend from W.Smith?

Smith wrote so many books. He was born in Northern Rhodesia (Zambia), and a lot of his novels are centred on Africa - some historical and some contemporary. It's hard remembering titles now as it's a long time since I read any.

Shout at the Devil and Gold Mine became movies.

I think it would be safe to start with his earlier books.

His web page may help:

http://www.wilbursmithbooks.com/home/index.html

Here's his complete bibliography with book summaries:

http://www.wilbursmithbooks.com/nove...liography.html

(Seeing all those titles is making me eager to start reading them again!)
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 10:22 AM   #37
Finn
Moderator
 
Finn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Finland
Posts: 8,917
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_al
Also Matthew Reilly is well known for his fast paced adventure novels. As an aside he also own the actual golden idol prop from Raiders.

Seven Ancient Wonders feat. Jack West looks good. Can anyone confirm?
I'd love to, but I really can't. Far too outlandish.

I mean, I don't mind a bit of wackiness now and then, but Reilly takes it up to eleven. I won't go into details but I felt like I was reading a saturday morning cartoon dressed as an adventure novel aimed for mature tastes.

I like Cussler and sure, he can also dabble in light fantasy at times, but Reilly starts wading in while continuing to pretend his feet are still dry. Pass.
Finn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 11:19 AM   #38
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn
I'd love to, but I really can't. Far too outlandish.

I mean, I don't mind a bit of wackiness now and then, but Reilly takes it up to eleven. I won't go into details but I felt like I was reading a saturday morning cartoon dressed as an adventure novel aimed for mature tastes.

I like Cussler and sure, he can also dabble in light fantasy at times, but Reilly starts wading in while continuing to pretend his feet are still dry. Pass.

Ahh that a real pity. I think I might give one of the books a try from the library then before jumping in.
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 12:53 PM   #39
Finn
Moderator
 
Finn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Finland
Posts: 8,917
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_al
Ahh that a real pity. I think I might give one of the books a try from the library then before jumping in.
If you enjoyed the silver screen version of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, then Reilly's storytelling might be up your alley. After all, we have varying degrees of tolerance for camp. I admit, I've only read the Seven Wonders, but judging by the synopses of his other works, I'd say he isn't getting better.

Perhaps not a master akin to Smith or Cussler, but Paul Sussman might be worth a look, if you weren't aware of him already.
Finn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 01:19 PM   #40
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 7,965
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_al
Are there any particular titles you would recommend from W.Smith?
I've only read a few Wilbur Smith books but they were definitely enjoyable:

"When the Lion Feeds"
"The Sound of Thunder"
"Shout at the Devil" (The movie version is so-so)
"The Dark of the Sun" (The movie version ROCKS! Al, check out this thread: Dark of the Sun)

Recently bought a new one, "The Triumph of the Sun" (published in 2005), but haven't read it yet.
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 01:49 PM   #41
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
My local library has The Quest by Wilbur Smith. it has excellent reviews but is it a sensible place to start when gauging his work?

Also thanks for the Sussman suggestion, Finn. I wasn't aware of him but I like the fact he has a bit of background in the field. I will most definately check him out.
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 02:02 PM   #42
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_al
My local library has The Quest by Wilbur Smith. it has excellent reviews but is it a sensible place to start when gauging his work?

You could narrow your choices down by selecting the period that most interests you at the moment.

The W. Smith Bibliography page looks like it dates the events of each novel. Some are set in the 1800s, some right up to the date of writing.

The Leopard Hunts by Darkness (a modern tale of Africa) was probably the last one I read. I was reading his books when I was at school, as both my parents were fans of them at the time. So the books were in the household, until space became an issue and they got boxed up for the charity shop.

I really regret that now, and talking about them again means I'm going to be looking out for them.

I'd have to recommend his earlier work, as those are the ones I've read.
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2011, 07:57 PM   #43
G-Man
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Oxley's Birthplace
Posts: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn
I'd love to, but I really can't. Far too outlandish.

I mean, I don't mind a bit of wackiness now and then, but Reilly takes it up to eleven. I won't go into details but I felt like I was reading a saturday morning cartoon dressed as an adventure novel aimed for mature tastes.

I like Cussler and sure, he can also dabble in light fantasy at times, but Reilly starts wading in while continuing to pretend his feet are still dry. Pass.
Yeah I have to agree. I've read all three 'Jack West' books, and whilst enjoying them, they are way over the top. Traps upon traps upon traps, all easily and quickly solved by West, who, despite his skills, is always one step behind the bad guys.
G-Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2011, 10:30 AM   #44
Ska
IndyFan
 
Ska's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,438
As over the top as they may be, I enjoyed both of the Jack West books (haven't read the 3rd one yet...The 5 Greatest Warriors). Another good one from Matthew Reilly is Temple. My friends and I based our Indy fan film around the book. (PM me and I'll send ya a link to watch it if you're interested).

As for James Rollins, I much prefer his older work. Excavation is great and a must read for Indy fans. Sandstorm is also good, as is Amazonia. I'm not a big fan of the SIGMA Force series, but they're interesting enough for me to want to read the next novel.

I've only read one Wilbur Smith novel, The Seventh Scroll. I really enjoyed it and have been meaning to read more of his work.

Another series you might like, if you like these, is the Babylon Rising series from Tim LaHaye. He's a Christian author (known for the Left Behind series), but doesn't get too preachy in this series. Basically each book is about the main character Michael Murphy, a college professor, trying to track down an artifact that will further prove the Bible correct. Like all adventure plots, there's (a group of) bad guys trying to stop him. He's only written 4 books so far in the series, and one hasn't been released since 2006. I hope he hasn't abandoned it. I'm really excited to see where the series goes from here.
Ska is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2011, 11:07 AM   #45
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ska
Another series you might like, if you like these, is the Babylon Rising series from Tim LaHaye. He's a Christian author (known for the Left Behind series), but doesn't get too preachy in this series. Basically each book is about the main character Michael Murphy, a college professor, trying to track down an artifact that will further prove the Bible correct. Like all adventure plots, there's (a group of) bad guys trying to stop him. He's only written 4 books so far in the series, and one hasn't been released since 2006. I hope he hasn't abandoned it. I'm really excited to see where the series goes from here.

That sounds really good actually. My Dad has been to bible college and the like and while I'm not that way inclined, we used to enjoy watching documentaries covering similiar topics.

Plus it gives me a good slant in trying to convince my parents to buy the book for me
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2011, 02:42 PM   #46
Ska
IndyFan
 
Ska's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,438
I really do like the Babylon Rising series. They also tend to get a little silly at times, but the good far outweighs the bad. I removed any possible spoilers in the book summaries below.

Quote:
Currently, there are four novels in Tim LaHaye's fiction series Babylon Rising (the first co-authored by Greg Dinallo and the others by Dr. Bob Phillips, Ph.D). Each novel has to do with the hero, Michael Murphy, a college professor, and his struggles (on which he is sent by a mysterious rich man calling himself "Methuselah") to find an artifact that could prove the Bible correct. Murphy must deal with "The Seven", an evil group "bent on creating a one-world religion, government, and currency," and Talon, the man with a knifelike fingernail on one prosthetic finger who carries out The Seven's orders.

Babylon Rising
The First Book goes by the same name of the series, Babylon Rising. It chronicles the adventures of Michael Murphy and how he tries to find the three pieces of The Brazen Serpent at the call of Methuselah. A video game version of Babylon Rising is currently in development.

The Secret On Ararat
The Second Book of the series, entitled The Secret On Ararat, again chronicles the adventures of Murphy and Isis and how they search for Noah's Ark in order to prove to the world the truths of the Bible.

The Europa Conspiracy
The Third Book in the series, called The Europa Conspiracy, is about the rise of the Seven and Michael Murphy's attempt to find the Handwriting on the Wall.

The Edge Of Darkness
The Fourth Book in Babylon Rising, The Edge Of Darkness, is about Michael Murphy locating the Lost Temple of Dagon which contains Aaron's Rod and the Golden Jar of Manna.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babylon_Rising
Ska is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2011, 06:43 PM   #47
Captain Craig
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 58
I've read 2 of Rollins books and got a third not long back and plan to read it soon. Map of Bones really sold me, great read!! I also pickd up The Rosetta Key by William Dietrich. Dietrich protagonist is Ethan Gage and I liked what I found there.
Captain Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2011, 05:24 AM   #48
Le Saboteur
IndyFan
 
Le Saboteur's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sham Shui Po
Posts: 1,924
It hasn't been mentioned yet, but Fredrick Forsyth's The Dogs of War should be added to the list; the book, not the movie. It tells a story that might be familiar to readers of The Dark of the Sun, but is definitely worth one's time.
Le Saboteur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2011, 01:59 PM   #49
adventure_al
IndyFan
 
adventure_al's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: scotland
Posts: 577
Just to report back:

Excavation by James Rollins was a great read. Prompted me to buy Map of Bones too. (only £2 brand new in a bargain bookshop!)

I also found, The Mayan Prophecy - Steve Alten:



Looks really good! Anyone read it?
adventure_al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2011, 03:31 PM   #50
indyt
IndyFan
 
indyt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Under the Temple Mount
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ska
I really do like the Babylon Rising series. They also tend to get a little silly at times, but the good far outweighs the bad. I removed any possible spoilers in the book summaries below.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babylon_Rising


That looks interesting.
indyt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:55 PM.