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Old 03-18-2011, 05:34 PM   #51
Ironclaw
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I've only read Amazonia by Rollins. Wasn't that great. Too much of a "10 Little Indians" thing going on.
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Old 03-19-2011, 05:23 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironclaw
I've only read Amazonia by Rollins. Wasn't that great. Too much of a "10 Little Indians" thing going on.

Excavation was good. Not exactally original but I'd expect most Indy fans to enjoy it.

Next up I've just started 'Hidden Oasis' by Paul Sussman.
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Old 04-24-2011, 08:09 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by adventure_al
Excavation was good. Not exactally original but I'd expect most Indy fans to enjoy it.

Next up I've just started 'Hidden Oasis' by Paul Sussman.

This was fantastic. Would definately recommend.

Last edited by Finn : 04-25-2011 at 05:31 AM. Reason: ye tags were messed up
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:17 AM   #54
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http://www.megaupload.com/?d=3DPRR6MZ

Here's a MS Excel file of my book list (read and not read)...in case you want any ideas.

Feel free to ask me any questions, and assuming I read it, I'll let you know whether or not it's a good read.
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Old 10-20-2011, 04:00 PM   #55
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Good Adventure Novels

Has anyone read 'The Noah's Ark Quest' by Boyd Morrison?



I've not quite finished yet (so no spoilers please!) but I have to say I'm thoroughly enjoying it! I'm sure the rest of you would find it entertaining reading material too.

It is his first book and the more particular amongst you I'm sure could pick flaws. However it is fast paced and exciting. Great story with likeable characters. I'd highly recommend it.

[PS. Mods. What about a literature section? much like the general movies section. Rather than just Indy specific literature]
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Old 10-20-2011, 04:31 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by adventure_al
[PS. Mods. What about a literature section? much like the general movies section. Rather than just Indy specific literature]
Very commendable idea, it's just unfortunately so that I don't think we have enough members who can read.
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Old 10-20-2011, 05:16 PM   #57
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Quote:
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Has anyone read 'The Noah's Ark Quest' by Boyd Morrison?
Not yet, Al, but thanks for the heads-up. If you can find it, be sure to check out the movie, "In Search of Noah's Ark", from 1976. (It was a feature film and not part of the TV series called, "In Search of...").
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Very commendable idea, it's just unfortunately so that I don't think we have enough members who can read.
The post-2008 Raven crowd sure know how to read comic books, though. That is undeniable and incontestable.
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Old 10-21-2011, 09:40 AM   #58
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The post-2008 Raven crowd sure know how to read comic books, though. That is undeniable and incontestable.
Well that's really a "look at the pictures" type of deal, and they have the dramas to help them along!

Adventure novels...hmm would Hostage to the Devil be considered an adventure novel?
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Old 10-21-2011, 02:55 PM   #59
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Personally I'm a fan of the classics. Recently read the original Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle (1912). Fantastic.

Time Machine by H.G. Wells. Even if you read them as a kid, they're worth rereading. And if you never read them, they're a must. I dropped Journey to the Center of the Earth after the 19th passage about mineralogy.

Yes they're straightforward with simple plot structures, but they're great reads with an air of nostalgia to them.

Chronicles of Narnia. LOTR. Also worth rereading.
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:59 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
Well that's really a "look at the pictures" type of deal, and they have the dramas to help them along!
You mean the word, "snikt", isn't in the dictionary?
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Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
Adventure novels...hmm would Hostage to the Devil be considered an adventure novel?
Dunno, but Wilbur Smith's, "Shout at the Devil", is!
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I dropped Journey to the Center of the Earth after the 19th passage about mineralogy.
Try and have another go, Goodeknight. Being an avid fan of Jules Verne, "Journey" is probably my favourite of his oeuvres. Really glad to hear that you've finally read, "The Lost World"! (First time I read it was an actual 1st edition printing from the McGill University library.)

Another classic to recommend is, "The Four Feathers", by A.E.W. Mason.
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Old 10-21-2011, 08:54 PM   #61
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I may have posted about this once before. Forgive my old age. 44 now!

Anyway, I couldn't resist a couple mentionings: The Lost City of Z is fantastic if anyone hasn't read it. The original Lost World is great, I agree. Lost City of Z details much of the life of Percy Fawcett. I know, he's a character from an Indy novel! He also (I'm sure many of you know this) was one of the biggest inspirations on Conan Doyle's The Lost World. Doyle knew him and used to sit in on his lectures at the Royal Geographic Society and that's how his imagination was sparked for a South American adventure into the unknown.

I see no one mentioned King of the Khyber Rifles. Great great book, and totally different from both films based on the book.

Also, lately I've been reading the Ian Fleming James Bond novels and they're just terrific. I had never read any of them. Had no idea what I was missing. I know, you might call them spy novels rather than adventures, but they're adventures to me.
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Old 10-21-2011, 10:46 PM   #62
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I see no one mentioned King of the Khyber Rifles. Great great book, and totally different from both films based on the book.
Nice to see you posting again, Stephen.

Yeah, "King of the Khyber Rifles"! Talbot Mundy's novels have been mentioned before here at The Raven. Particularily, in these 2 threads (which would benefit from a thread merge):

Quality Adventure Novels
Book Classics: H. Ryder Haggard and Crichton

Talbot Mundy wasn't mentioned here but it's essentially the same topic:
If You Like Indiana Jones, You Might Like...

There's also this short-lived, 'adventure book' thread: Real Life Adventure

P.S. There is a thread here about the recent "Lost City of Z" book.

Last edited by Stoo : 10-21-2011 at 11:01 PM.
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:32 PM   #63
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ok i've got a question for yall. do you know of any good steampunk fiction books?? ive read the Ghost books (Ghosts of Manhattan and Ghosts of War), and i am really into steampunk. in fact, im writing a book about steampunk. but do any of you read that kind of fiction? if so, i'd love to know what you've read!!
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:41 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy Scout 117
ok i've got a question for yall. do you know of any good steampunk fiction books?? ive read the Ghost books (Ghosts of Manhattan and Ghosts of War), and i am really into steampunk. in fact, im writing a book about steampunk. but do any of you read that kind of fiction? if so, i'd love to know what you've read!!

Wasn't Wild, Wild West a novel with steampunk and western elements?
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:53 PM   #65
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Wasn't Wild, Wild West a novel with steampunk and western elements?
yeah i wanted to see that movie. is there a book about it or is it just a movie??
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Old 12-23-2011, 11:01 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Drifter
Wasn't Wild, Wild West a novel with steampunk and western elements?

My understanding is that it was just a tv show and a movie, although I could be wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy Scout 117
ok i've got a question for yall. do you know of any good steampunk fiction books?? ive read the Ghost books (Ghosts of Manhattan and Ghosts of War), and i am really into steampunk. in fact, im writing a book about steampunk. but do any of you read that kind of fiction? if so, i'd love to know what you've read!!

Apart from the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen graphic novels, there's obviously the pre-steampunk works of science fiction from which steampunk is derived. You've done the Verne & Wells classics?

As an aside, the film version of Verne's submarine adventure was released 57 years ago today.

Also, there's a blog that may be of interest.
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Old 01-13-2012, 09:16 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy Scout 117
ok i've got a question for yall. do you know of any good steampunk fiction books??

The Leviathan Trilogy by Westerfield & Thompson fits both of those bills, steampunk & adventure. It has pretty pictures too. You might fancy the works of Cherie Priest as well.

Take in the dulcet tones of Abney Park too.

The original pulps are rarely mentioned around here and I wanted to mention a couple that are well worth anyone's time. G-8 and his Battle Aces details the heroic exploits of the World War I aviator and spy G-8!





The Yanks and English knew him as “The Red Falcon.” The French call him “L’ Faucon Rouge.” The Germans curse him as “Verdamnt Der Rot Falker.” Unjustly wanted for a firing squad on his own side of the lines––Facing death from the Germans on the other! He is a man abandoned by his own country, but still willing to die for it! Along with his aide, the great African warrior Sika, The Red Falcon fights WWI on his own terms.

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Old 02-17-2012, 04:54 PM   #68
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Just finished this. Thoroughly enjoyed it! Coincidently it was the first in a series. I plan to read them all. Would definately recommend giving it a go.
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Old 02-22-2012, 11:58 PM   #69
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maybe not true adventure books, but Carl Hiaasen and Tim Dorsey write some pretty crazy stories set in Florida.
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Old 04-09-2012, 10:33 AM   #70
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Originally Posted by adventure_al


Just finished this. Thoroughly enjoyed it! Coincidently it was the first in a series. I plan to read them all. Would definately recommend giving it a go.

So good I went straight on to the next one from the local library! So much better than the somewhat lame titles suggest. Some one read them so we can talk about how awesome they are!!!



My other recent read was sandwich in between the Andy McDermott ones. I played it safe with good old Clive Cussler... while he usually sticks to tried and tested lay outs but this is definately one of his better ones!

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Old 04-09-2012, 09:29 PM   #71
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Ask me again in a few years, and I'll definitely have one book to recommend for you all...
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:09 PM   #72
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I guess these wouldn't technically count as "adventure novels" (one reviewer called them "theological thrillers"), but I recommend Paul Maier's trilogy of A Skeleton in God's Closet, More Than a Skeleton, and The Constantine Codex. I really enjoyed them, and I don't see why Indy fans wouldn't also, since they include lots of archaeology, suspense, mystery, etc. The main character is Dr. Jonathan Weber, a Harvard professor of biblical studies. The first book revolves around the apparent discovery of Jesus' bones in a grave in Israel and the third focuses on the discovery of a lost book from the New Testament.
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Old 06-29-2012, 06:48 AM   #73
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The Road to Samarcand by Patrick O'Brian.

Yes, the title is spelled correctly. I was at my local bookseller earlier today looking for something else, when I came across this...

Quote:
...story [that] begins where Patrick O'Brian's devoted fans would want it to, with a sloop in the South China Sea barely surviving a killer typhoon. But the time is the 1930s, and the protagonist a teenaged American boy whose missionary parents have just died. In the company of his rough seafaring uncle and an elderly English cousin, an eminent archaeologist, Derrick sets off in search of ancient treasures in central Asia.Along the way they encounter a charismatic Chinese bandit and a host of bad characters, including Russian agents fomenting unrest.

If you haven't heard of it, don't be surprised. Originally written in 1954, it wasn't published until after Mr. O'Brian's death in 2000. While I'm only a couple of pages in, it definitely shows much promise.
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Old 07-04-2012, 06:42 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Le Saboteur
The Road to Samarcand by Patrick O'Brian.

Yes, the title is spelled correctly. I was at my local bookseller earlier today looking for something else, when I came across this...



If you haven't heard of it, don't be surprised. Originally written in 1954, it wasn't published until after Mr. O'Brian's death in 2000. While I'm only a couple of pages in, it definitely shows much promise.

Sounds good. i'll try look it up.

Currently rattling through some Indy novels. Most recently 'the philosophers stone'.

Ordered Antarktos Rising as well. No idea if any good yet but sounds interesting.

Quote:
THE WORLD RACES TO CLAIM A NEW CONTINENT...

A phenomenon known as crustal displacement shifts the Earth's crust, repositioning continents and causing countless deaths. In the wake of the global catastrophe, the world struggles to take care of its displaced billions. But Antarctica, freshly thawed and blooming, has emerged as a new hope. Rather than wage a world war no nation can endure, the leading nations devise a competition, a race to the center of Antarctica, with the three victors dividing the continent.

It is within this race that Mirabelle Whitney, one of the few surviving experts on the continent, grouped with an American special forces unit, finds herself. But the dangers awaiting the team are far worse than feared; beyond the sour history of a torn family, beyond the nefarious intentions of their human enemies, beyond the ancient creatures reborn through anhydrobiosis--there are the Nephilim.

It mentions the Nephilim so thats enough incentive for me to give it a bash!
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Old 07-08-2012, 04:15 PM   #75
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I just finished reading [i]The Road to Samarcand[i] by Patrick O'Brian.

It is a pretty good book but just pretty good.

Young American boy (12-14 years old?) and two hard-boiled sailors land in China, meet the boy's uncle, and head for Samarcand.

The uncle is a prominent archeologist but is nothing like Indiana Jones, more of an absent-minded professor.

The time period setting is not stated in the book, the cover says the 1930's, but a late-1940's invention shows up.

The first part of the story is set on a boat, so there is lots of nautical talk, as one might expect from the author of the Captain Aubrey British Navy books.

Most of the story takes place in rural China, the group travels with Mongols and Chinese war-lord armies.

The last part of the book is set in Tibet, not the Tibet of Lost Horizon, but a much more violent place.

There are no women in this book.

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