TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > Off Topic > Archaeology
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-15-2008, 09:04 PM   #1
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Yes, Sankara Stones are "Real"

The Real Sankara Stones
This thread is the product of the common misconception that the Sankara Stones in ToD were made up artifacts. In fact, they were not. There are no Sankara Stones, per se, but sacred stones do exist. They are known as Lingam. The Sankara Stones, according to Indy, were given to the world by Siva, so the correct name for them would be Siva Lingam.
Adi Sankara was a Hindu philosopher of roughly 800 CE credited with reviving Hinduism. It is he that the "Sankara Stones" are named after.
Like I said earlier, the Sankara Stones, or Siva Lingam, are real. In Hindu practices, Shiva is usually worshipped as the Shiva linga. In images, he is generally represented as immersed in deep meditation or dancing the Tandava upon the demon of ignorance in his manifestation of Nataraja, the lord of the dance.

For more information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siva_lingam_stone
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adi_Sankara

Photo Gallery:
Statue of Adi Sankara:


The Somnath Jyotirlinga:


I would post others, but most are too big.
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2008, 09:44 PM   #2
ReggieSnake
IndyFan
 
ReggieSnake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 519
Hey WillKill! Where have you been?

Interesting topic. This pic looks most like the stone from the movie. Though I guess from the article that "linga" is a broad term and that only those that are symbols of Shiva have this shape. Here is the part of that first wiki article talking about them:
Quote:
Lingam as a symbol of Shiva

A. L. Basham says that linga have been found in the Harappan remains, and provides these comments relating to the antiquity of the symbol:

"... Shiva was and still is chiefly worshipped in the form of the liṅga, usually a short cylindrical pillar with rounded top, which is the survival of a cult older than Indian civilization itself.... The cult of the liṅga, at all times followed by some of the non-Āryan peoples, was incorporated into Hinduism around the beginning of the Christian era, though at first it was not very important."[7]

Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami explains in the lexicon section of his book, Dancing with Shiva, that "Shivalinga is the most prevalent icon of Shiva, found in virtually all Shiva temples. It is a rounded, elliptical, aniconic image, usually set on a circular base, or peetham. The lingam is the simplest and most ancient symbol of Shiva, especially of Parasiva, God beyond all forms and qualities. The Peetham represents Parashakti, the manifesting power of God. Lingas are usually of stone (either carved or naturally existing, swayambhu, such as shaped by a swift-flowing river), but may also be of metal, precious gems, crystal, wood, earth or transitory materials such as ice. According to the Karana Agama (6), a transitory Shivalinga may be made of 12 different materials: sand, rice, cooked food, river clay, cow dung, butter, rudraksha beads, ashes, sandalwood, darbha grass, a flower garland, or molasses."

Furthermore, there are instances in Hindu lore where a rock or pile of sand has been used by heroic personages as a Lingam or symbol of Shiva. For example, Arjuna fashioned a lingam of clay when worshipping Shiva. Thus, it is argued, too much should not be made of the usual shape of the Lingam. This view is also consonant with philosophies that hold that God may be conceptualized and worshipped in any convenient form; the form itself is irrelevant, the divine power that it represents is all that matters.

Hindu interpreters often use the underlying meaning of "sign" or "mark" for the Sanskrit word linga as the basis for their commentaries. For example:

* The name Lingam appears as a name of Shiva in the Shiva Sahasranama where it is translated by Ram Karan Sharma as "(Identifiable as) a symbol of the origin of the Universe."[8]

* Bansi Pandit, in his book, Hindu Dharma said, that "Shivalinga means "Shiva symbol."

* Swami Sivananda, said that "Linga means a mark, in Sanskrit. It is a symbol which points to an inference. When you see a big flood in a river, you infer that there had been heavy rains the previous day. When you see smoke, you infer that there is fire. This vast world of countless forms is a Linga of the omnipotent Lord. The Siva-Linga is a symbol of Lord Siva. When you look at the Linga, your mind is at once elevated and you begin to think of the Lord." [1]

Western commentators often use the concept of "male generative organ" as the basis for their interpretations. For example: - - *Monier-Williams provides one definition for lingam as: "The male organ... esp. that of Siva worshipped in the form of a stone or marble column..."[9]. - - *Gavin Flood's An Introduction to Hinduism refers to the worship of Shiva "in his form as the Śiva liṅga or 'icon' found in most Hindu temples. The linga represents a phallus..."[10]
ReggieSnake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2008, 07:06 PM   #3
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Alas, Reggie and I are the only ones that care...
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2008, 07:09 PM   #4
ResidentAlien
Guest
 
ResidentAlien's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,303
Sweet.

Yeah, I knew they weren't entirely fictional. Never seen real ones though. Very cool, thanks for sharing.
ResidentAlien is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2008, 04:37 AM   #5
Michael24
IndyFan
 
Michael24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: California
Posts: 1,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
The Real Sankara Stones
This thread is the product of the common misconception that the Sankara Stones in ToD were made up artifacts. In fact, they were not. There are no Sankara Stones, per se, but sacred stones do exist. They are known as Lingam. The Sankara Stones, according to Indy, were given to the world by Siva, so the correct name for them would be Siva Lingam.

I'd always wondered if the Sankara Stones were derived from the Lingams. And now that I think about it, the old man in the village does say something about "they took Shiva Lingam," though because of his accent it sounds like "linga."
Michael24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2008, 03:06 AM   #6
DocWhiskey
IndyFan
 
DocWhiskey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Earth
Posts: 2,386
Wow, thanks for sharing. I actually like the look of the real stones better then the ToD renditions.
DocWhiskey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2008, 10:06 AM   #7
China Jim
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hurricane WV
Posts: 89
Linga or Lingam?

Both are correct. It is also a representation of the male reproductive organ there has been a few specials on the history channel confirming this I would recommend checking it out by doing a search on the site of the history channel.
As a side note if you take a look at Indy When hes at the sacrifice the symbol on his head is the trident of Siva or Shiva. I am a historian by training so I looked into things connected to the movie TOD what I found so funny was Indy's speaking a northern dialect to the village folk While in the palace they are speaking Hindi I checked with Indian friends of mine and they confirmed my presumptions. Also I am sure someone has brought this up but if not heres another goof in the film Thug did not use cords to strangle with they used a weighted scarf which they either looped around the targets neck or snapped it out like a whip to encircle the neck pull down and the finished off. After which the Thugs would break the back then fold the target over and bury them. When the Brits during the time of Clive routed them they were identified by what they carried a shovel and a pick ax. Now this is the official report but some info has come to light that the whole outbreak was expanded upon by a British officer who wrote up the reports to gain more money from the crown to fight the uprising of the Thugs but the money went for the officer to purchase land in his area well thats my 2 cents worth so I hope you all will look into it enjoy
China Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2008, 01:51 AM   #8
Indy Byrd
IndyFan
 
Indy Byrd's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 192
my "Sankara Stone"

I am new to the Raven. I have a natural stone that resembles the Sankara Stones featured in TOD. My stone is smooth like from a sacred river but only has two lines that are naturally formed across the stone. It is usually the first thing talked about in my "Indy" collection. It is however a little smaller than the props used in the film, it is however a nice piece.
Indy Byrd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 11:44 AM   #9
Rocket Surgeon
Guest
 
Rocket Surgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 8,872
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
This thread is the product of the common misconception that the Sankara Stones in ToD were made up artifacts.
In fact, they were not.
There are no Sankara Stones, per se

Way to bait and switch!

I thought you were saying Raven Member Sankara HAD NO STONES!
Rocket Surgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 03:48 PM   #10
Dark Horse
IndyFan
 
Dark Horse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: London, England
Posts: 171
Great thread! Very interesting!
Dark Horse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2009, 01:10 AM   #11
MaverickKing
IndyFan
 
MaverickKing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 126
Whoa, this was well-researched. Well done!!
MaverickKing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 02:53 AM   #12
Archaeologist
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Berlin, Germany, but born & raised in Chicago
Posts: 40
At University we learned about the worship of the lingam in southeast asian cultures (and their origin) and was surprised to hear that the followers (in this case from modern day Indonesia and Cambodia) held this symbol as the phallus of Siva. Some rituals involved pour water over the top of the standing phallus to solidify rule and, not a surprise, fertility. The use of the phallus lingam in this way can still be found today in southeast asia.
Some Hindu Indians do not like this "interpretation" of the lingam as such. I have interpretation in quotes because it is not an interpretation but how the people use/worship it today.
I have not been able to do any research on the culture of India, specifically in the area of religious practices, but from what I have heard regarding India's modern culture is that they are rather conservative in certain areas (i.e. clothing). Being openly conservative regarding physical issues would be no surprise. Didn't Richard Gere get in trouble for some trivial matter like a kiss whilst in India? Anyways... This could account for why some Hindus do not acknowledge the Lingam as a phallus.
However modern Indians wish to classify the lingam, the fact remains that the lingam came from India, was brought to southeast asia where it is currently worshiped as Siva's phallus and has been since it has arrived as evident in the archaeological record. I have no reason to suspect that it came all the way from India and suddenly (not to mention unconditionally) was worshiped as a phallus, while in India it remained in some sort of original form or concept (i.e. Not a phallus, but something else).

Point is: Indy was going after a collection of magic rock... phalli.
Archaeologist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2011, 11:37 PM   #13
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Dig Diggin' up an old thread of mine...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaeologist
...the followers (in this case from modern day Indonesia and Cambodia) held this symbol as the phallus of Siva.
Near as I can tell, most Hindus don't believe that to be the case. I'm not sure about Indonesia and Cambodia, but Indian Hindus, such as Sri Swami Sivananda, think that interpretation is simply incorrect. It seems to have been introduced by William Ward, a British missionary and author of A View of the History, Literature, and Mythology of the Hindoos. Ward claimed that the worship of sivalinga was "the last state of degradation to which human nature can be driven," representing symbolism "too gross ... to meet the public eye." Near as I can tell, other Western scholars took that idea and ran with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaeologist
Some rituals involved pour water over the top of the standing phallus to solidify rule and, not a surprise, fertility. The use of the phallus lingam in this way can still be found today in southeast asia.
If that is the case, it could be a perversion of the original Hindu meaning of the sivalinga. Plenty of what we think of as "primitive" religions worship fertility gods and goddesses, and it could be that these groups in Southeast Asia have substituted Siva in their rituals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaeologist
Some Hindu Indians do not like this "interpretation" of the lingam as such. I have interpretation in quotes because it is not an interpretation but how the people use/worship it today.
But it's not how everyone worships it, so I would still think it's an interpretation... At any rate, I'm really confused by your statement that:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaeologist
I have no reason to suspect that it came all the way from India and suddenly (not to mention unconditionally) was worshiped as a phallus, while in India it remained in some sort of original form or concept (i.e. Not a phallus, but something else).
Anthropologically speaking, that really makes sense. Jesus' original followers didn't celebrate his birthday every December 25th, for several reasons (historically, he almost certainly was not born on that day, and less importantly, the twelve disciples didn't use the Gregorian calender). That people celebrate Christmas today on that date is the result of an evolution of Christian religion and culture. The early Christians found it practical to combine Christmas with pagan practices to make conversion easier. It would make sense that Indonesian cultures would similarly combine the old with the new.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaeologist
...India's modern culture is ... rather conservative in certain areas (i.e. clothing) ... This could account for why some Hindus do not acknowledge the Lingam as a phallus.
I think the reason they don't acknowledge it as a phallus is that they don't view it as such, and probably never have. The lingam are (generally) aniconic symbols, the reason being that, historically, the Hindu view is that:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swami Sivananda
Lord Siva is really formless. He has no form of his own and yet all forms are His forms. All forms are pervaded by Lord Siva. Every form is the form or Linga of Lord Siva.
As a result, they believe that:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swami Sivananda
The foremost Linga which is primary and is devoid of smell, colour, taste, hearing, touch, etc., is spoken of as Prakriti (Nature).
The lingam are usually (and from what I can gather, ideally) simple stones in a simple form. A statue of Siva does not really represent Him well because He is "formless." According to Swami Sivanada,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swami Sivananda
Linga means ‘mark’, in Sanskrit. It is a symbol which points to an inference. When you see a big flood in a river, you infer that there had been heavy rains the previous day. When you see smoke, you infer that there is fire. This vast world of countless forms is a Linga of the Omnipotent Lord. The Siva Linga is a symbol of Lord Siva. When you look at the Linga, your mind is at once elevated and you begin to think of the Lord.
In the end, maybe the Freudian views the cylindrical lingam as a phallic symbol, but (as the smoker Freud allegedly said) "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 09:02 AM   #14
Sharkey
Guest
 
Sharkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: In the balcony, stage right.
Posts: 446
Quote:
Originally Posted by WiKi4Food
Near as I can tell
How can you tell?
Sharkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2011, 03:39 PM   #15
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharkey
How can you tell?
The ones who followed Ward, such as Gustav Oppert, all said pretty much the same thing, based on the kind of interpretation he offered. I'm not saying they took his word for it, but he is the earliest one I can find who implies that the stones are phallic symbols. He, and others, didn't understand that the stones represent an abstract symbol of Siva with no sexual reference attached to it.

Some scholars, such as Indologist Wendy Doniger, once claimed that the stones represent Siva's own phallus, but most Hindus whose opinions I've read (and many Western scholars, as well) disagree. Even Doniger herself later recanted her assertion. All of these claims seem to be based on psychoanalytic assessments, and much of psychoanalysis itself doesn't really mesh well with anthropology or even science.
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2011, 10:04 PM   #16
I.M.J.
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
Even Doniger herself later recanted her assertion. All of these claims seem to be based on psychoanalytic assessments, and much of psychoanalysis itself doesn't really mesh well with anthropology or even science.

I think you mean "Freudian". Psychoanalysis has really given way to psychometric nowadays, which is incredibly quantifiable. Although Psychoanalysis was clearly Freud's contribution to the science of understanding human behavior, you're sort of generalizing or misrepresenting the totality of psychoanalysis here.

I'm just saying that if you really wanted to be accurate, you'd be saying Freudian assessments as opposed to psychoanalytic, which has a broader meaning than you are applying here.

-Hey, Indy would agree that if you want to have intelligent conversations, then you've got to represent things correctly.-
I.M.J. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2011, 10:56 PM   #17
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by I.M.J.
I think you mean "Freudian".
Well, yes, in part of the post, but not necessarily all of it. On the one hand, I certainly was referring to Freudian psychoanalysis for a great deal of the preceding comment as well as the one you quoted. In the preceding post, I even referenced Freud,
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
In the end, maybe the Freudian views the cylindrical lingam as a phallic symbol, but (as the smoker Freud allegedly said) "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."
This discussion about the idea that the lingam are phallic symbols was definitely a discussion about Freudian interpretations, but when I said,
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
...much of psychoanalysis itself doesn't really mesh well with anthropology or even science.
I meant psychoanalysis in general. I'm not sure what form (or perhaps 'school' would be the better word?) of psychoanalysis you are referring to as "incredibly quantifiable," but my understanding of it is that it is rather unscientific.* Human behavior is observable, but mental activity itself is not. MRIs and PET scans and indirect tests like that may be "quantifiable," but today's cognitive psychologists have replaced Freud's concept with an "implicit" or "automatic" notion of cognitive processes that diverges from Freud's, using it only as a 'jumping-off point' of sorts. It may sound like I'm just repeating you here, because I'm focusing on Freud rather than today's psychoanalysts, but I am under the impression that this idea of the "unconscious mind" lies at the very basis of all psychoanalysis.
Now, if that is completely wrong, then I stand corrected, but if that is an accurate statement, then I stand by the assertion that psychoanalysis is ultimately a pseudoscience, unless you are saying that neuro-psychoanalysis (which seeks a biological basis) is today's mainstream psychoanalysis.

*Given what we know about biology today, dualism is outmoded, and on a solely theoretical basis, any hypothesis of the "unconscious" is unscientific because it cannot be falsified.
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2011, 04:34 PM   #18
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 8,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
This thread is the product of the common misconception that the Sankara Stones in ToD were made up artifacts. In fact, they were not. There are no Sankara Stones, per se, but sacred stones do exist.
Nice thread revival, WillKill, though it's puzzling that you recently wrote the below in the Thuggee - Fact & Fiction thread:
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
And the whole story is really screwed up to begin with. The Sivalinga MacGuffin is really sketchy.
I'm presuming you say 'sketchy' because diamonds don't magically glow. I wonder if there were ever lingam with gems inside?
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2011, 04:46 PM   #19
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
I'm presuming you say 'sketchy' because diamonds don't magically glow. I wonder if there were ever lingam with gems inside?
Sketchy indeed, because...
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
There are no Sankara Stones, per se, but sacred stones do exist.
Besides, telling us that five lingam could be used to overthrow Siva and control the world is like saying that five crucifixes could overpower Jesus* and turn Christianity on its head. The lingam are just a symbol of Siva, and given that many (but presumably not all) Hindu scholars believe that the lingam are supposed to be aniconic, I think putting gems inside them would sort of defeat the point.

*To be fair, in reality, it took only one... But ya know what I mean.
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2011, 06:31 PM   #20
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 8,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
The lingam are just a symbol of Siva, and given that many (but presumably not all) Hindu scholars believe that the lingam are supposed to be aniconic...
If they are supposed to be aniconic, how can they be 'a symbol of Siva'? Isn't that a contradiction of terms?
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
...I think putting gems inside them would sort of defeat the point.
I'm not talking about inserting gems into the stones but rather:
Mining rock from a mineral deposit and then carving the lingam around the gems contained within. Surely, it wasn't a probable practice but it's entirely within the realm of possiblity. I'm just wondering if there was ever a recorded case of something like this?

P.S. I have a lot to say to you in a couple of other India-related threads so, as Short Round said, "Hold on to your potatoes!"
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2011, 10:25 PM   #21
WillKill4Food
IndyFan
 
WillKill4Food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York City, the Big Apple
Posts: 1,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
If they are supposed to be aniconic, how can they be 'a symbol of Siva'? Isn't that a contradiction of terms?
"Aniconic" can simply mean "not forming an image," so I suppose it depends on what you mean by "image." An "image" could be any symbol, but in this context I would call an "image" a visual rendering, such as a statue of Ba'al or Michelangelo's Creation of Adam. A stone, with minimal detailing, would not be an image, but rather a mere representation. It's not a perfect description, but I have seen "aniconic" associated with lingam multiple times, so it is not my word choice. Regardless, I think you can understand the meaning of the word in this sense. I quoted Sri Swami Sivananda in a preceding post, and he explained it as follows,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swami Sivananda
Lord Siva is really formless. He has no form of his own and yet all forms are His forms. All forms are pervaded by Lord Siva.
As such, the ideal lingam is "devoid of smell, colour, taste, hearing, touch, etc." Sivananda claims that "Prakriti" (Nature) is the aforementioned "foremost" ideal lingam, but he's a religious man who, like so many others, adheres to convictions that are not necessarily coherent. From what I can piece together from Sivananda's descriptions, the lingam are to Hinduism what the crucifix is to some Christians.
(Some. Yes, some, but of course not all. I almost feel that such qualification is necessary because of the tangents that can sprout off from one poorly-chosen word.)
You see, I was raised in a fundamentalist Baptist church, and to them, "any graven image" meant that "idols" of Jesus were a no-no. So they considered statues of Christ on the cross (but not paintings, oddly) to be against the Second Commandment. Once, during an Easter service, somebody put a cross somewhat resembling a less-flashy Cross of Coronado up near the pulpit, and the pastor and my Deacon father had a fit. To them, the cross was okay because it wasn't Jesus himself, but showing Jesus on the cross was tantamount to idolatry.
Now, I'm not saying that Hindus see the lingam that way. Images of Siva in human form are not considered blasphemy, to my knowledge, but they are "inadequate" for worship because they do not represent the formlessness of Siva. Siva is not a mere human, so representations of Him, as beautiful as they may be, are not as meaningful as lingam, which represent his formlessness. I have not read that the stones' connection with nature also makes it an ideal lingam, but I would think that to be the case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Mining rock from a mineral deposit and then carving the lingam around the gems contained within. Surely, it wasn't a probable practice but it's entirely within the realm of possiblity.
Food for thought, I guess.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
P.S. I have a lot to say to you in a couple of other India-related threads so, as Short Round said, "Hold on to your potatoes!"
I think most of my mistakes have been cleared up. I'll be the first to admit that I am no expert on India by any means, but I think a lot of the discussion in some of these threads has been based on semantics that may or may not actually contribute to the topic or even be indicative of my own sentiments. People often misunderstand the particularly meanings of a word or phrase and twist it into something different altogether.
At any rate, the research of my university's anthropology departments focuses almost exclusively on Central America, so I don't know that I'll ever get a chance to learn anything about India that didn't come from the web or some book on a shelf. That being said, books aren't always accurate, particularly books written by colonialists (and sometimes natives themselves), with both sides being occasionally biased. In the end, I am still learning, and if I am shown to be wrong, I'll admit it.

Last edited by WillKill4Food : 01-09-2011 at 10:35 PM.
WillKill4Food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2012, 12:11 PM   #22
russds
IndyFan
 
russds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 279
I've always enjoyed how the McGuffins are at least initiated in real life stuff.

Found this:

Quote:
The Sankara Stones are based on the sivalinga, the symbol of the Hindu God Shiva. According to Hindu lore, Sankara was a priest who ascended Mount Kalisa where he met Shiva. Shiva passed on five stones invested with magical properties that Sankara could use to combat evil.

"Shiva lingas" are sacred symbols of Shiva. Originally the cylindrical shape represented the formlessness of creation, then gradually became associated with Shiva. All Shiva temples have sivalinga as the main diety. They can be found in temples and shrines throughout India. There are several types: The Anadi, or Svaymbhu, are considered the most sacred, and originate from heaven itself, falling from the sky. The Jangam are miniature symbols, often cast in stone, clay, metal or other material. They are small enough to be worn as amulets or necklaces, and are often thought of as "movable" lingas.
russds is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:17 PM.