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Old 06-27-2009, 05:36 PM   #26
Bjorn Heimdall
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I've been meaning to pick up Blade Runner, been too long since I saw it the last time, but I've been confused with all these versions coming out... I want the one with the... really cool ending
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Old 06-27-2009, 07:24 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bjorn Heimdall
I want the one with the... really cool ending
Are you talking about the no voice over ending or with them driving thou the country side (I heard that one sucks)?
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Old 06-28-2009, 12:52 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insomniac
Are you talking about the no voice over ending or with them driving thou the country side (I heard that one sucks)?

The first version I saw ended as soon as Rick joined Rachael and closed the doors. Bang--credits. Best version in my opinion, as it leaves the most uncertainty.

I checked out the voice-over version on YouTube and it leaves a less-than-pleasant taste in the mouth. My mouth, anyway. Too family-friendly, pandering to those who always want a happy ending. That wasn't the film's message--it was nearly the opposite! Loosely quoting from what I remember in the ending voice-over: "Rachael was a special kind of replicant, and they said she would never die."
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Old 06-28-2009, 05:29 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insomniac
Are you talking about the no voice over ending or with them driving thou the country side (I heard that one sucks)?

No That one doesn't sound very cool. And you guys should watch out with the spoilers.
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Old 06-28-2009, 03:44 PM   #30
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Sorry for the spoiler but you shouldn't be poking around a thread with a purposed sequel if you haven't seen the original!
It doesn't make sense...
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Old 06-28-2009, 05:59 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlivePoet
The first version I saw ended as soon as Rick joined Rachael and closed the doors. Bang--credits. Best version in my opinion, as it leaves the most uncertainty.

I checked out the voice-over version on YouTube and it leaves a less-than-pleasant taste in the mouth. My mouth, anyway. Too family-friendly, pandering to those who always want a happy ending. That wasn't the film's message--it was nearly the opposite! Loosely quoting from what I remember in the ending voice-over: "Rachael was a special kind of replicant, and they said she would never die."

"It's too bad she won't live. But then again, who does?"

It's also funny how Edward James Olmos, one of the greatest actors ever, did Blade Runner and went on to do Battlestar Galactica 20 years later. Both of which deal with robots who are identical to humans and whether or not they should be treated as such.
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Old 06-28-2009, 06:02 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewy9
"It's too bad she won't live. But then again, who does?"


That's the quote from the Director's Cut. AlivePoet was referring to the (inferior) theatrical version in which the line is as he stated.
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Old 06-28-2009, 06:25 PM   #33
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That's the quote from the Director's Cut. AlivePoet was referring to the (inferior) theatrical version in which the line is as he stated.

There are so many versions, I can't keep them straight. I thought that was in all of them.
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Old 03-27-2010, 01:54 AM   #34
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A new Blade Runner project?

Aintitcool has an interesting article, or blurb I should say about a possible new Blade Runner project:
http://www.aintitcool.com/node/44418

Hmmm, not sure what to think. But I thought the accompanying commets were hilarious. And of course someone had to mention Shia as a new Rick Deckard.
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Old 03-27-2010, 02:02 AM   #35
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I wouldn't necessarily want a reboot, but I wouldn't mind a new film about a new Bladerunner agent. Maybe taking place after the 1st film. Have a nod to Deckard and the events.

Or better yet....

Stop reboots and remakes and have an original movie for once.
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Old 03-27-2010, 02:19 AM   #36
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K W Jeter has already written sequels to Blade Runner (2: The Edge of Human and 3: Replicant Man). I've had the books on my bedside table for months, but have been too busy reading Star Wars novels to get around to them (currently reading the final part of Jeter's 'Bounty Hunter Wars' trilogy).

There's already been so many versions of Blade Runner, that I'd rather see a sequel than a reboot.
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Old 03-27-2010, 03:27 AM   #37
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A really clever thing would be to do a prequel, one with the real Deckard...
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Old 03-27-2010, 03:52 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn
A really clever thing would be to do a prequel, one with the real Deckard...

That would be very interesting.
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Old 03-27-2010, 04:35 AM   #39
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Is it ever really established beyond doubt that Deckard was an android?

I've had the Final Cut DVD for some months, and haven't gotten around to watching it yet, so I don't know if Ridley ever came to a definitive answer. There are three commentaries on the discs, so there might be some light shed amongst them.

Blade Runner definitely doesn't need a reboot. Right from the original it had a special haunting quality, through the imagery, music and pensive tone.

I'm not sure if a prequel would be a good thing, if it answered questions that were best left open.
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Old 03-27-2010, 05:19 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
Is it ever really established beyond doubt that Deckard was an android?
The original version is ambiguous, but the subsequent cuts by Ridley Scott don't leave very much room for other interpretation than that he is, in fact, a replicant.


Interestingly enough, in Philip K. Dick's original novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Deckard is never represented as anything but a human. This is also the case with Jeter's literary sequels (there's also 4: Eye and Talon) for the movie. But if we consider the Final Cut to be the definitive version as indicated by Scott... there's not really a 'canon answer' to be found here.
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Old 03-27-2010, 08:05 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn
The original version is ambiguous, but the subsequent cuts by Ridley Scott don't leave very much room for other interpretation than that he is, in fact, a replicant.


Interestingly enough, in Philip K. Dick's original novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Deckard is never represented as anything but a human. This is also the case with Jeter's literary sequels (there's also 4: Eye and Talon) for the movie. But if we consider the Final Cut to be the definitive version as indicated by Scott... there's not really a 'canon answer' to be found here.

Thanks for all that info, Finn.

I remember from the Director's Cut that Deckard's unicorn dream and the silver foil unicorn were indications that he may have had implanted 'memories'.

So, if Ridley is doing another Blade Runner, then Jeter's books may not be his preferred direction.
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Old 03-27-2010, 02:51 PM   #42
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Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human makes an interesting theory that most or all of the Blade Runners are acually replicants, specially made to hunt down their own kind when they go bad. They all get false memories and such. I, for one, think that this would be a plot thread worthy of a cinematic sequel.
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Old 03-27-2010, 07:48 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn
The original version is ambiguous, but the subsequent cuts by Ridley Scott don't leave very much room for other interpretation than that he is, in fact, a replicant.

[Cynically]He just said that to drive DVD sales.
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Old 04-01-2010, 03:24 AM   #44
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I watched The Final Cut, and am rewatching it with Ridley's commentary on. He actually comes out says that the unicorn is an implanted memory, and "...would say to those who have been paying attention that Deckard is a replicant."

At the end he says that Deckard and Rachael may both be Nexus 8 Replicants, which means that they would live normal length lives.

Another thing he said which I thought was interesting, was that he envisioned the world as depicted in Blade Runner to be the same earth that the crew of Alien would have left.
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Old 04-01-2010, 09:47 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn
Interestingly enough, in Philip K. Dick's original novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Deckard is never represented as anything but a human.

Actually, Dick's novel plants a seed of doubt, though Dick himself did not intend Deckard to be a replicant, if my memory is right. The book was supposed to leave you wondering just a little.

Jeter's BR2 was a pretty good story, and would hand Holden something to do other than get shot. However, I would rather see Ford return in a Jeter-inspired sequel, taking place many years later. And Eddie Olmos as Captain Gaff!
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Old 04-02-2010, 04:03 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
Another thing he said which I thought was interesting, was that he envisioned the world as depicted in Blade Runner to be the same earth that the crew of Alien would have left.

So I wonder if this is something we can expect in his Alien prequel if it gets made.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:04 AM   #47
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So I wonder if this is something we can expect in his Alien prequel if it gets made.

It wasn't something that had occurred to me before - that in Blade Runner Ridley was creating a homeworld for the characters in Alien.

Chonronologically, Blade Runner takes place in 2019, and Alien in 2122, but the technology is the same retro-future style of boxy monitors and TVs. So, I wonder if the new Blade Runner and the new Alien prequel will continue the retro theme.

As an edit to my post above about Ridley's commentary on The Final Cut, he later mentions Deckard and Rachael as possibly being "Nexus 7", so his earlier "Nexus 8" comment was a numerical mistake.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:43 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Chewbacca Jones
Actually, Dick's novel plants a seed of doubt, though Dick himself did not intend Deckard to be a replicant, if my memory is right. The book was supposed to leave you wondering just a little.
I never got an impression of a doubt but simply one of a subtle metaphor. It's simply meant to arise the question "what is human?". Of course, the movie does this too, with the level of subtlety depending on the cut.

I don't know which cut I'd prefer, though. The Final Cut is nice for little added extra coherence, but the original has its ambiguity, which is a redeeming quality in my eyes. Spelling it out certainly robs a whole bunch from the magic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Smith
Chonronologically, Blade Runner takes place in 2019, and Alien in 2122, but the technology is the same retro-future style of boxy monitors and TVs. So, I wonder if the new Blade Runner and the new Alien prequel will continue the retro theme.
It's amazing really, how actual technological development has managed to surpass the human imagination in just two decades. Of course, we have nothing that even closely relates to an Esper or hovercars, but still in a way the world we live in now is a lot more futuristic than anything they were able to come up with such a short time ago.

And sometimes it's there to serve us a jarring disrepancy, when the in-world tech simply looks degraded in the instances that should be taking place chronologically later. Yes, I'm looking at you, Uncle George.

Last edited by Finn : 04-03-2010 at 02:50 AM.
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Old 04-03-2010, 07:29 AM   #49
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It's amazing really, how actual technological development has managed to surpass the human imagination in just two decades. Of course, we have nothing that even closely relates to an Esper or hovercars, but still in a way the world we live in now is a lot more futuristic than anything they were able to come up with such a short time ago.

And sometimes it's there to serve us a jarring disrepancy, when the in-world tech simply looks degraded in the instances that should be taking place chronologically later. Yes, I'm looking at you, Uncle George.

Ridley makes a comment on this subject when Deckard uses the telephone in the bar. He said that even if he made the film today he wouldn't have made it a holographic image telephone, as he believes that would go beyond mere functionality into something gimmicky.

The one thing that he keeps mentioning is that Orwell's 1984 was a big influence, and that even if Deckard wasn't a Replicant, he was still just a machine within a greater machine.

Something I just learnt, was that the term Blade Runner has a connection to William S. Burroughs (of Naked Lunch and Junky fame), a writer I've found fascinating for many years:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia


The Bladerunner

The novel The Bladerunner (also published as The Blade Runner) is a 1974 science fiction novel by Alan E. Nourse.

Plot

The novel's protagonist is Billy Gimp, a man with a club foot who runs "blades" for Doc (Doctor John Long) as part of an illegal black market for medical services. The setting is a society where free, comprehensive medical treatment is available for anyone so long as they qualify for treatment under the Eugenics Laws. Preconditions for medical care include sterilization, and no legitimate medical care is available for anyone who does not qualify or does not wish to undergo the sterilization procedure (including children over the age of five). These conditions have created illegal medical services in which bladerunners supply black market medical supplies for underground practitioners, who generally go out at night to see patients and perform surgery. As an epidemic breaks out among the underclass, Billy must save the city from the plague hitting the rest of the city as well.

Connection to the film Blade Runner

The book is a version of a common science-fiction plot, which suggested the title of the 1982 science-fiction film Blade Runner (which was otherwise unrelated beyond the common element of dystopian futures). Both of the earlier works use the term "bladerunner" to describe black market suppliers of items needed for medical care.

In 1979 William S. Burroughs was commissioned to write a story treatment for a possible film adaptation. This treatment was published as the novella Blade Runner (a movie). Burroughs acknowledged the Nourse novel as a source, and prominently set a mutated virus and right-wing politics in the year 1999.

No film was produced from it, but Hampton Fancher, a screenwriter for the 1982 film (based on science fiction author Philip K. Dick's 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), had a copy, and it suggested the title Blade Runner as one more tantalizing than the successive earlier working titles, "Android" and "Dangerous Days". Within the film, the phrase appears as an informal term for the personnel of the police "Rep-Detect" division, i.e. those whose duties are to track down and destroy escaped "replicants," or androids.

Ridley Scott bought any rights to the title "Blade Runner" that might have arisen from either the Nourse novel or the Burroughs story treatment.
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Old 04-24-2010, 12:46 AM   #50
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I haven't heard any new Blade Runner news, but I learned some more old news about the original.

I've started watching the Dangerous Days: Making Blade Runner film.

Hampton Francher, the first screen writer, had Robert Mitchum in mind to play Deckard. Francher was later replaced by David Peoples due to disagreements with Ridley over changes to the script. Then Dustin Hoffman was seriously considered for the role, and some of the storyboards bear Dustin's image.

Harrison Ford came to Ridley's mind, due to his work in Raiders of the Lost Ark, though the fact that Harrison wore a fedora as Indy, annoyed Ridley since he wanted that look for Deckard, to tie into the film noir theme.
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