TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > Off Topic > Films
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-18-2004, 11:22 AM   #26
agent5
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 25
That's the second nod to Raiders I've seen in a review.
agent5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2004, 07:28 AM   #27
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Saw it in a 3/4 full 8:00 p.m. showing last night. I'll be surprised if the film cracks much over $100M US (or signifcantly more than that). I'll be shocked if it makes more than $30M this weekend. Visually, the film had a nice texture and the least amount of exposition that I've ever seen in a film -- but to me it's just the next in a long line of film's that include Rocketeer and The Shadow that try to capture the '30's but don't really capture the public's imagination.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2004, 01:55 PM   #28
Luckylighter
IndyFan
 
Luckylighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 331
I saw it twice on Friday. That should give you an idea of what I thought of it. I liked how the filmmakers put their own spin on old concepts. Like they do something like the Indy red line traveling map, but again they did their own version of it that totally worked and looked great.

There are some people who say it is not original--I disagree. What Conran et al. have done is tweek familiar concepts, cliches, etc., and put their own stamp on it.

Which isn't to say the movie was flawless. I would have liked to have seen more fisticuffs, more dogfighting in the planes, and more human enemies. But that is all minor. The film really succeeds in its visuals. It is really a film that tells its story through the visuals--its a visual storytelling style, much like the German expressionists, who are heavily referenced in the film.

I tend to rate a movie based on how many times I get goosebumps from what I see on the screen. I give it about 5 bumps up. Go see this movie!
Luckylighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2004, 02:41 PM   #29
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Stick a Fork in the 1930's?

O.K. so the film garnered $16.2M this past weekend with Paramount research showing that 70% of the audience was over the age of 25 while 55% was male. In this day and age, that number is mind-boggling for a big-budget/big cast film that's rated PG.

I love the 1930's but I've got to believe that studios will take this as a sign that it's time to just give up trying capture the period. Sure Raiders did it but how many other films have tried and failed? The big money in film is kids latching onto the film and that's just not going to happen with Sky Captain. The 1930's are just another age that is too far back in time, and kids today just can't relate and don't care. Unfortunately, I'm afraid that Sky Captain just goes to show that no one cares about bows to great films like Lost Horizon and 'aw-shucks' style adventure. I'm thinking kids would rather have their 'Fast and Furious 3 -- Go-Cart Madness'.

Further to my prior post, there is no way that this film cracks $100M in the U.S. (and I'll be surpised if it cracks $90M). Based on the audience info above, I'm betting that most of the people who wanted to see this film saw it the first weekend and now it will stagger on and die a quiet death.

[I'd like to kick around the artistic merits of the film -- which I enjoyed for the most part -- but right now I'm just too hung up on this fate-of-the-'30's-in-film issue.]
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2004, 09:15 PM   #30
IndyFrench
TR.N Staff Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 83
Yeah, Joe. It's a shame. And I saw all of the films you mentioned in the theatre:

Sky Captain
Rocketeer
Shadow
Phantom

etc, etc, etc

Wish things could be different.

Mike
IndyFrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 05:08 PM   #31
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
I meant to post this earlier but had problems:

From boxofficeguru.com:

"Nosediving 57% in its second flight, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow fell to second place with $6.7M pushing its cume to $25.5M in ten days. The $70M Paramount release should end its domestic journey with about $40M."

Sure with overseas grosses, cable and DVD sales, the film will make money but I think it goes to show that even with a big name cast, great period feel, great action, that it's just not enough to make $$$.

As I said, with the exception of Indy IV, I think this is it for action/adventure set in 1930's. I just don't see studio execs seeing the 1930's as a good place to spend their action/adventure dollars. We'll just have to make due with the occassional period movie like The Aviator and Finding Neverland.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 05:18 PM   #32
agent5
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 25
The don't even sweat it so much nowadays with dvd. They make soooo much of the $$$ on dvd sales and rentals.
agent5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 09:34 PM   #33
Raffey
IndyFan
 
Raffey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: California
Posts: 422
Studios make a big deal when a movie tanks and doesn't generate profit. However, in reality, a large studio/distributor doesn't really mind as long as its catalog of films continues to grow with more and more films being played on cable or regular TV.

Many times, one successful film for a studio can pay for a dozen others that didn't do so well.

As the movies maintain a life in television rebroadcasts, in the long run, a studio generates some pretty hefty revenue from its film catalog as a whole, even if many of the movies weren't blockbusters.

Last edited by Raffey : 09-28-2004 at 09:35 PM.
Raffey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 10:05 PM   #34
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Quote:
Originally posted by agent5
The don't even sweat it so much nowadays with dvd. They make soooo much of the $$$ on dvd sales and rentals.


My point was that there's only 'X' amount of dollars that a studio spends on action/adventure, and it's much more profitable to churn out a $40M 'Fast & Furious' type movie which will do three or four times the box office of the $70M 'Sky Captain' and three or four times the DVD sales. Kids just ain't digging the Captain. So while Sky Captain won't lose money -- it's no where near as profitable of cheaper more popular alternatives. Studios will invest their action/adventure dollars accordingly.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 10:45 PM   #35
monkey
Guest
 
monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,068
With all due respect JB, at some point you have to stop looking at the dollar signs, and consider the Art.

The 1930's is indeed a very far gone age, but at least to this Indiana Jones/1930's junkie, it will live on forever.

Unfortunately for me dollar signs are too real these days, which is why I will wait until this movie comes out in DVD. At that time I will view this film, which appears very fascinating from its trailers. Angelina Jolie looks hot (duh!), and it looks like a great Action/Adventure flick.

Can't wait to see it (in a few months); I've already bought the microwave popcorn.
monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2004, 11:00 PM   #36
Tennessee R
IndyFan
 
Tennessee R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 1,008
I thought it was okay, but, after reading Ebert's comments, and then seeing it (Tonight), I was a little dissapointed. A little dissapointed in the action, a little dissapointed in the tech-twist, and a little dissapointed in the ending.

All in all, I'm glad I saw it,
but it was messing up the colour on purpouse to make it look authentic.
It really reminded me of a Superman cartoon on VHS about these robots (Which looked extremely similar to the ones in the movie), and of course, Superman has to save Lois Lane, (Which was in the press business, also) and, I really think they used that in the making of the movie, it was so similar.
Tennessee R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2004, 08:51 AM   #37
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Quote:
Originally posted by monkey
With all due respect JB, at some point you have to stop looking at the dollar signs, and consider the Art.


I hear you Monkey. I want to discuss Art and visually styling of Sky Captain as well but I'm hung up on Sky Captain's box-office returns because I think it's a bellwether film. The film got a lot of attention in the industry and it's success or failure will likely impact what movies get made in the future. Even a decent success would have boded well for other period action/adventure going forward.

Historically, one of the reasons why period films didn't get made was due to prohibitive cost -- which had two consequences: (1) a producer committed to spending big dollars on sets/design usually skimped on talent, which could lead to the film's demise, (2) a period film that cut costs sometimes wouldn't successfully capture the period -- which also would turn off fans.

CGI was supposedly going to solve those problems and enable a studio to spend the dollars on cast. Sky Captain was the poster child for the all CGI movie coupled with a big name cast and it fell flat on it's face. I've got to believe that this failure will hurt the prospects for other 1930's movies. I love the period and would like to see more. I guess we'll just have to see how King Kong does.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2004, 08:52 AM   #38
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
[Additional Post in Error]

Last edited by Joe Brody : 09-29-2004 at 08:53 AM.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2004, 09:34 PM   #39
monkey
Guest
 
monkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,068
I hear you JB. All good points that you make. Yes, you're right that the Dollar signs are quite important, probably most important in the long run.

I can't comment until I see it. But I think that the trailers look cool. Maybe I'll be disappointed. But maybe not.

I loved the movie "The Rocketeer", and this looks kind of like it has that feel.
monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2004, 09:45 AM   #40
Luckylighter
IndyFan
 
Luckylighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 331
What really bothers me about it's dismal box office is the fact that it was intended to be a trilogy. But since the poor ticket sales, I doubt there will be any sequels. And I would have liked to have seen more installments.

Not that it was a perfect film. It sufferred from Phantom Menace-itis, in that there were no human enemies at all, except for those two guys in Nepal. There should have been more fisticuffs between Sky Captain and real, human villains. More than anything, that was what this film lacked, and it's what keeps it from instant classic status.

But, as it's been said ad nauseum here and elsewhere, the film had an amazing visual style that is sorely lacking in what is passing for blockbuster entertainment today--"Fast and the Furious", I'm looking in your direction.

People say today's youth market is more sophisticated than ever. That's a load of crap, because we are talking about a generation that made Vin Diesel a star. Although he was good in "Saving Private Ryan", he's really a one note actor, who's only appeal is the gimmick of his deep voice. Being computer savvy does not make a person or group of people "sophisticated"...life experience does.

If anything, I think today's youth market is more childish. I think they are less sophisticated than ever. Our parents grew up with the B Movies that we admire today. And they loved those movies despite and because of the low tech special effects. Because they relied on their imaginations to make the FX into something grander. Kids nowadays don't have to imagine anything because the work is already done for them.

And don't even get me started on how they dress. When did wearing a baseball cap cockeyed become a fashion choice? Because Kevin Federline does it?

Of course that's just my opinion, I could be wrong.--Dennis Miller
Luckylighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2004, 09:45 AM   #41
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Monkey,

I'll be very interested in your thoughts once you see the film - storywise, it's very stripped down. It doesn't have the traditional early character-development scenes (like the Williams/Arkin scenes in Rocketeer). I prefer Sky Captain to Rocketeer if for no other reason than I prefer Jude Law to Williams.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2004, 10:49 AM   #42
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Quote:
Originally posted by Luckylighter
. . .But, as it's been said ad nauseum here and elsewhere, the film had an amazing visual style that is sorely lacking in what is passing for blockbuster entertainment today--"Fast and the Furious", I'm looking in your direction.

People say today's youth market is more sophisticated than ever. [. . . ]

If anything, I think today's youth market is more childish. I think they are less sophisticated than ever. Our parents grew up with the B Movies that we admire today. And they loved those movies despite and because of the low tech special effects. Because they relied on their imaginations to make the FX into something grander. Kids nowadays don't have to imagine anything because the work is already done for them.


Lucky,

Part of me really agrees with you (there's something wrong with a movie like 2 Fast 2 Furious where they start shooting before they have a script), but I gotta say that I'm conflicted on this point. I like both Fast And The Furious movies (heck, I even liked Torque). So I can't outright condemn the styling in these films or the preferences of younger people because I get the appeal of these movies: the comaraderie is sincere, the stars (Monet Mazur, Jordana Brewster, Michelle Rodriguez, and Eva Mendes) have a visual style all their own, and the action is kickin. Plus, having the action unfold in today's sprawling ex-urbs is relevant because it has to make the action seem more real to young viewers than a film featuring some guy in a fedora skulking around some set made to look like an ancient ruin. And lastly, one could even argue that the rebel amibiguity in Paul Walker's character is just as compelling that the ambiguity seen in Indiana Jones in Raiders.

That said, I still prefer the period film because it has history, requires more creativity and it's just plain more thought-provoking.

As for sophistication, I agree with you but it's not so clear cut. Which movie has more sophisticated humor: the original Freaky Friday or the remake with Lindsay Lohan?
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2004, 12:22 PM   #43
Raffey
IndyFan
 
Raffey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: California
Posts: 422
Just because Sky Captain wasn't well receipted by moviegoers alike.

I don't think it means that it'll be the end of this genre of film like many seem to think. Really, the end of 30's period pieces?

What makes this altered fake-looking version of the 30's a period piece?

Road to Perdition is a period piece.

Personally, I thought Sky Captain was a too videogame/cartoonishly looking when I first saw the trailer. It has all the elements of a movie that should appeal to me but it didn't.


After viewing the trailer at the theatre and all I can think of was watching that backlight effect for two hours will give me a headache.

When is comes out of DVD, then I'll watch it. At least then I can change the color settings on my TV.
Raffey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2004, 03:41 PM   #44
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
Quote:
Originally posted by Raffey
Just because Sky Captain wasn't well receipted by moviegoers alike.

I don't think it means that it'll be the end of this genre of film like many seem to think. Really, the end of 30's period pieces?

What makes this altered fake-looking version of the 30's a period piece?

Road to Perdition is a period piece.



I agree that drama and other films will continue to be set in the '30's (like The Aviator). I was obsessing on action/adventure films. Road to Perdition was a Period Crime Drama, not action/adventure.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2004, 08:46 PM   #45
Rumpled Fedora
IndyFan
 
Rumpled Fedora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Echo Beach, MN
Posts: 772
Just got back from seeing the movie. I think it's one of the best I've seen this year, along with The Day After Tommorow which I liked.
Kinda funny how they both have the word 'Tommorow' in the titles...
Rumpled Fedora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2004, 12:25 PM   #46
Canyon
IndyFan
 
Canyon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Originally from the UK but now living in Pennsylvania, USA!!!
Posts: 2,212
I saw this movie on Monday, and I have to say, I was quite impressed.

It was highly enjoyable and visually stunning to look at as well, and as Relic Raider pointed out, Polly's line was very similar to the one Indy used in Raiders. I believe that along the way the term 'very dangerous' was used.

Another reference to Lucas was the door that they broke the window to which had the number 1138 on it.

Here's a review of the soundtrack from Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...sical&n=507846

Director Kerry Conran's retro-themed action adventure is imbued with a singular visual sense, an ambitious marriage of Indiana Jones' serial sensibilities and the neo-Deco sci-fi trappings of Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers. Young composer Edward Shearmur is charged with bringing that pulp-visionary, past-that-never-was to musical life, a task he accomplishes with expected orchestral verve. Its music that's as unabashedly derivative as the film's grab-bag of 1930s/40s influences, yet arranged and executed with a rich orchestral palate and an endlessly energetic dynamic sense. While he deftly avoids walking too closely in the familiar musical footsteps of John Williams---and there are admittedly no themes here as instantly memorable as Raiders of the Lost Ark's signature march---Shearmur manages a few smart new themes of his own, breathing compelling new life into one of filmdom's most cliched genres---and trumping previous similar back-to-the-future adventure scores like James Horner's The Rocketeer the bargain.
Canyon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2004, 09:07 AM   #47
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,652
If you're in the New York City area and can't get enough of Sky Captain, this Saturday (November 6th.) Sarah Lawrence College will be having a screening of the film at 3 p.m. as part of the kick-off for the school's new Visual Arts Center. It seems that one of the producers was a Sarah Lawrence grad, Jon Avnet SLC '71.


For information, go to www.sarahlawrence.edu or call 914-395-2412. I live in the neighborhood of Sarah Lawrence and got a mailer about the event, so I assume it's open to the public and free. I don't know if there's a panel to discuss the film -- but I assume that it's a neat way to learn more about the film. Sarah Lawrence is also pretty cool place to visit.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2004, 02:54 AM   #48
McSeem
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: far, far away...
Posts: 55
I'm only seen a theatrical trailer and I'm gonna watch this movie very soon. BTW, lots of airplanes reminds me not only Crimson Skies video games, but else a Disney's animated series "TaleSpin" (well, some ideas of this series and SC&NW are very similar).
McSeem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2011, 03:52 AM   #49
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,616
Watched Sky Captain again yesterday with an open mind. It's a film that I've always wanted to like, since unlike The Rocketeer, it actually does capture a lot of 1930s atmosphere without merely alluding to it.

However, there has always been one major barrier to enjoyment: the horrible blurry soft focus that had no place in the movie. If they were trying to give the impression of a '30s Republic serial, then they failed. The serials would have been sharp when first shown in cinemas, and from what I've seen so far many are still sharper than Sky Captain.

Secondly there's the colourization issue. Sky Captain probably looks better if you watch it in black and white, and that's the case with the original six minute short that Kerry Conran presented in 1998. Caught between the demands of an audience that prefers colour, and the intention to produce a black and white period piece, the movie sells itself short.
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2011, 08:11 AM   #50
AndyLGR
IndyFan
 
AndyLGR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 837
I did enjoy Sky Captain and thought it was something completely out of the ordinary (in recent times at least). I like the concept of the sci-fi b-movie and I enjoyed the period in which they set it, but I'm of the mind that maybe they should of used real sets along with the CGI.
AndyLGR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:29 AM.