TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > Off Topic > Globe-trotting
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-03-2010, 08:07 AM   #51
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Raiders
I do enjoy being 17, I'll tell you one thing, alot of my friends pick on me about it, but I'm going to be a kid as long as I can get away with it.

I reckon you can get away with it forever. I decided never to grow up. That entitles me to collect toys!
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 08:51 AM   #52
Joosse
IndyFan
 
Joosse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Amstelveen, the Netherlands
Posts: 361
I know I always feel like the biggest kid in the classroom...

Joosse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 02:13 PM   #53
The_Raiders
IndyFan
 
The_Raiders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long View Texas
Posts: 2,099
Haha, I'm going to try to get away with it as long as I can before mre adult-like responsabilities fall on me.
The_Raiders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 03:16 AM   #54
Joosse
IndyFan
 
Joosse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Amstelveen, the Netherlands
Posts: 361
All of a sudden I see visions of you in Raiders running away from the big stone in the Chachapoyan temple, only this time the stone is marked 'adult responsabilities'...

Joosse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 05:45 AM   #55
Montana Smith
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 10,617
Keep running Raiders, don't ever get crushed by the persistently rolling boulder known as 'adult responsibilities'. After all, even Indy managed to avoid them until 1957!
Montana Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2011, 02:58 PM   #56
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 7,972
Arrow Bump

The recent mayhem in Cairo this month has compelled me to post these photos...

Taken from the riverside patio of a restaurant in the Maadi district (just south of Garden City). About 2 weeks ago, the restaurant was torched & burned down to the ground! A serene image...who knew that (in less than 2 years time) it would be the scene of such violent upheaval?



A westward shot of The Nile from downtown Cairo. Taken from the rooftop swimming pool at the Hilton World Trade Center which was looted 2 weeks ago.

Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 04:18 PM   #57
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 7,972
*BUMP*

So, Goodeknight, how was your latest trip to Cairo? Did you notice any difference in people's attitude after their "Arab Spring"? (My girlfriend & I want to take a Nile trip down to Luxor before the tombs are closed off to the public forever.)

Most importantly, did you feast on some of that superbly delicious, Egyptian chicken?
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 11:41 AM   #58
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 1,007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
*BUMP*

So, Goodeknight, how was your latest trip to Cairo? Did you notice any difference in people's attitude after their "Arab Spring"? (My girlfriend & I want to take a Nile trip down to Luxor before the tombs are closed off to the public forever.)

Most importantly, did you feast on some of that superbly delicious, Egyptian chicken?

It was a great trip, Stoo, though I wish I would have had 1) more time off to re-see the sites, and 2) my wife and son with me! She and I met in Cairo while studying abroad in 1991, then lived there again 1995-1997. Haven't been back since, so it was killing me to return without her. Perhaps on a future trip.

In talking to Egyptians about the revolution, the main thing I found was disappointment. Here's the gist of the sentiment: 'The people in Tahrir Square didn't want a revolution. We just wanted change. We wanted jobs, the chance to make a decent living, opportunities, etc. That eventually spiraled into a revolution. Now that Mubarak is gone and there is a new government -- everything is the same. Nothing has changed for us. We're still struggling.'

Overall, things seemed a little tense and uncertain. Not scary-tense, just stressed-out-tense. But it was odd to go past big government buildings gutted by fire, and to be at the Hilton, next door to a government building where a bunch of Coptic Christian protesters had been run over and killed by a military vehicle.

It was also odd to go to the Egyptian Museum and walk into the King Tut rooms without waiting in line. The museum was practically empty and there were hardly any tourists anywhere. I did take a moment to call home while I stood face to face with Tut's golden funerary mask. That was a highlight.

I did have some great chicken, and lots of shwarma and khufta and shish kebab. Bought some tea that I've missed for 15 years, and a huge Bedouin tent fabric. But I was disappointed to find out the Pyramids closed at 3 p.m. This was as close as I could get:



(Incidentally, it was the only time during the trip I wore a fedora.)

Again, a great trip. I look forward to returning, hopefully in less than 15 years this time.
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2013, 06:17 PM   #59
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 7,972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodeknight
In talking to Egyptians about the revolution, the main thing I found was disappointment. Here's the gist of the sentiment: 'The people in Tahrir Square didn't want a revolution. We just wanted change. We wanted jobs, the chance to make a decent living, opportunities, etc. That eventually spiraled into a revolution. Now that Mubarak is gone and there is a new government -- everything is the same. Nothing has changed for us. We're still struggling.'

Overall, things seemed a little tense and uncertain. Not scary-tense, just stressed-out-tense. But it was odd to go past big government buildings gutted by fire, and to be at the Hilton, next door to a government building where a bunch of Coptic Christian protesters had been run over and killed by a military vehicle.

It was also odd to go to the Egyptian Museum and walk into the King Tut rooms without waiting in line. The museum was practically empty and there were hardly any tourists anywhere. I did take a moment to call home while I stood face to face with Tut's golden funerary mask. That was a highlight.
Belated thanks, Goodeknight, for your insightful commentary (good photo, too). My friend's Egyptian wife echoes the same thoughts as those you described. I can only imagine how weird your experience must have been last year...and now further upheaval is happening AGAIN (though not as violent). Egypt is a country in trouble, begging for stability. Let's hope it gets it.

Since a certain photo of mine is getting attention from friends on Facebook, I felt like sharing this with you fine folks:



NEWS FLASH: It is possible for Indy-fans to visit Egypt...if they stop spending their hard-earned ca$h on going to Disney parks and buying toys! This can be achieved. Pool your money into the right place and you WILL get there!
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 09:46 AM   #60
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 1,007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Belated thanks, Goodeknight,

If you'd have waited another month, it could have been an even year between our two posts!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
I can only imagine how weird your experience must have been last year...and now further upheaval is happening AGAIN (though not as violent). Egypt is a country in trouble, begging for stability. Let's hope it gets it.

Without Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, I think they have a better shot at stability and peace now. It was crazy to see news footage of protests in Cairo, as Egyptians carried signs with Obama Xed out and the words, "Stop Supporting Terrorists."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo


Great pic! Very "Lawrence."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
NEWS FLASH: It is possible for Indy-fans to visit Egypt...if they stop spending their hard-earned ca$h on going to Disney parks and buying toys! This can be achieved. Pool your money into the right place and you WILL get there!

Funny! Yeah, while it's great to see cars and trucks from Indy movies, it's all the better to go to *real* places where adventure actually happens!

And here's another plug -- depending on your starting point, a trip to Egypt might cost less than a trip to Disney. If you don't have to stay at the Hilton, you can get around Egypt pretty cheaply.

(Stoo, I'll look for your reply here around June next year...)
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 11:03 PM   #61
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 7,972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodeknight
If you'd have waited another month, it could have been an even year between our two posts!
Dang, I should have waited another month! But you didn't have to wait until 2014 for this reply.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodeknight
Without Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, I think they have a better shot at stability and peace now. It was crazy to see news footage of protests in Cairo, as Egyptians carried signs with Obama Xed out and the words, "Stop Supporting Terrorists."
That was scary, for sure. Hopefully things will settle down soon. Tourism is beneficial to Egypt's economy and who wants to go there when a sh!t storm is going on?

I'm itching to go back. My girlfriend & I are considering another trip but she wants no 'Indiana Jonesing' and wishes to spend the whole time at Sharm el-Sheikh for the beautiful beaches we keep hearing about. This would be fun for the snorkelling (& scuba, which I've never done) but I'd much rather go down the Nile to see the Abu Simbel temples and, of course, Luxor.

Have you ever been to any of these places, Goodeknight?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodeknight
Funny! Yeah, while it's great to see cars and trucks from Indy movies, it's all the better to go to *real* places where adventure actually happens!

And here's another plug -- depending on your starting point, a trip to Egypt might cost less than a trip to Disney. If you don't have to stay at the Hilton, you can get around Egypt pretty cheaply.
Good point. Things are inexpensive once you're there and taxi fares are peanuts compared to North American/European prices. Getting around Cairo by taxi is cheap & easy!

Cairo Taxi & Fedora Story: One time we got out of a cab and, after it left, I realized that my precious, Panama hat was still in the car! Without saying a word to my friends, I took off to chase it on foot, running like The Six Million Dollar Man. (My friends thought I had vanished into thin air). After a long distance, the situation looked hopeless as the taxi was heading to merge onto a highway but, MIRACULOUSLY, some helpful Egyptian guy on a horse-driven fruit cart, more than a mile up the street, saw me legging it and flagged the driver down since it was the only car on the road. The taxi driver stopped & waited. By the time I caught up, I was drenched in sweat from running in the blazing sun (104° Fahrenheit)...but I got my frickin' hat back!

Here is the hat, earlier that same day, at the Citadel:


Last edited by Stoo : 07-24-2013 at 11:08 PM.
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2013, 09:53 AM   #62
Goodeknight
IndyFan
 
Goodeknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 1,007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Cairo Taxi & Fedora Story:

Awesome story! While one branch of Egyptian culture takes very much after the Ferengi (if you catch the Star Trek reference), the vast majority of Egyptians are caring and helpful people. Tourists often give Egyptians a bad rap, because the only Egyptians they've run into are the pesky peddlers outside the pyramids.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
I'm itching to go back. My girlfriend & I are considering another trip but she wants no 'Indiana Jonesing' and wishes to spend the whole time at Sharm el-Sheikh for the beautiful beaches we keep hearing about. This would be fun for the snorkelling (& scuba, which I've never done) but I'd much rather go down the Nile to see the Abu Simbel temples and, of course, Luxor.

Have you ever been to any of these places, Goodeknight?

Never been to Sharm el-Sheikh, but I know a lot of people who have been, and there's definitely a consensus that it's gorgeous. I did go snorkeling at Dahab and that was great. I've since gotten my scuba license and was able to dive at a premiere spot in South Africa. Loved it. If you manage to get your license before you go, you'd have a chance to dive at one of the world's top dive destinations (at Sharm). But great snorkeling would be an easy alternative.

I have been to Abu Simbel, and it was fantastic. (Incidentally, those places would be "up" the Nile from Cairo.) Abu Simbel's a bit remote, so it was a long haul by bus to get out there. But though it was just about the only thing to see in that neck of the woods it was well worth the day trip. Having nothing around actually adds to the mystique a bit. I'm assuming you know the history of cutting it into bits to move it out of the man made flood zone. One of my professors at AUC was part of one of the teams trying to document all the little monuments before they got covered by Lake Nasser.

Finally, saving the best for last, Luxor is one of my favorite spots on the planet. You really get the feel for classical Egypt there. Pace of life is much slower, in contrast to the hustle and bustle of Cairo. People are friendlier. And across the Nile it's like you stepped back in time a thousand years. Mud brick houses, green fields, donkeys, and date palms. The temples and other monumental structures are absolutely amazing. The fact that many are surrounded by that lush countryside with the slow pace of life just makes it all the better. Add the Valley of the Kings, and I'm about ready to bolt for the door and head to the airport myself!

Here's something to consider -- on one of my trips there, I rented a motorcycle at one of the hotels, took it across the Nile on the ferry, and went tooling around the countryside between Valleys of the Kings and Queens, Tombs of the Nobles, Hatshepsut's temple, Ramasseum, etc. Think you'd really enjoy that.

Another trip, when my wife and I were just dating, we hired a "guide" and some donkeys, and he took us up over and around the hills and paths to the same spots. Another memorable experience.
Goodeknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2013, 04:22 PM   #63
Stoo
IndyFan
 
Stoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Canadian from Montreal)
Posts: 7,972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodeknight
Awesome story! While one branch of Egyptian culture takes very much after the Ferengi (if you catch the Star Trek reference), the vast majority of Egyptians are caring and helpful people. Tourists often give Egyptians a bad rap, because the only Egyptians they've run into are the pesky peddlers outside the pyramids.
Glad you enjoyed the story, Goodie, (and I get the Ferengi reference) but I have an even better one about the kindness of the Egyptian people. Something happened one night in Cairo which opened my eyes & heart a great deal and changed me as a person. I really should stop and take the time to write it up properly.

Re. "up" the Nile: Of course, you are correct and I shouldn't have made that mistake. In my head, I was thinking "down south". A great interest of mine is the British Army's ill-fated 1884-85 Nile Expedition to save General Gordon in the Sudan, during which plenty of battles were fought. It's a pipe dream of mine to follow their course "up" the Nile to Khartoum, where it splits into the Blue and White.

That's cool that your prof was involved in documenting the Abu Simbel site before it was relocated (and, yes, you assumed right that I was aware of the move). A most impressive feat of preservation, perhaps even the greatest.

Re. Luxor giving the "feel for classical Egypt". I get what you mean and that's what I want. Seeing a monument on its own is one thing but seeing a whole bunch together in one place evokes the day-to-day life of the ancients. (Visiting Pompeii and Rome's Capitoline Hill gave me goosebumps because of this "feel" and I want the Egyptian version of it.)

Anyway, thanks for elaborating further on your experiences & recommendations. Your descriptions sound idyllic and you are a true adventurer! Driving a motorbike is something else that I've never done. Rode on them many times but never on my own. If your motorbike was an older, noisy one that would've make the adventure even better. Yes?

Last edited by Stoo : 07-26-2013 at 04:32 PM.
Stoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:05 PM.