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Old 11-01-2011, 06:17 PM   #51
Stoo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Here's a thought experiment: where would you put the divisions in the existing four films for this sort of release model?
Here's a thread about "Temple of Doom" presented in serial fashion:
Temple of Doom: The Serial

...and these 3 threads based on the exact, same YouTube treatment for "Raiders". (The video has been removed.)

Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Serial watch it like real serial
Raiders as Black and White Serial
Awesome Serial
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
Not sure whether these would be the best places for cliffhangers or not (especially since each "chapter" here is probably not equal in time), but:
Raiders
-Part I...
GabbaGabbaHey's topic is about Indy 5...Yes? No? He is suggesting a different approach so dividing the previously released Indy films into "chapters" has little to do with the subject at hand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
Perhaps the OP's idea, assuming it is financially sound, would work best storywise in a new series with a character and storytelling style the people are not so familiar with.
Even though I somewhat agree with this, the "OP"* said that no other "franchise" or "series" besides Indy could pull this off.

*OP: People have NAMES, y'know. Try using them!
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Old 11-01-2011, 06:44 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Here's a thread about "Temple of Doom" presented in serial fashion:
Temple of Doom: The Serial

...and these 3 threads based on the exact, same YouTube treatment for "Raiders". (The video has been removed.)

Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Serial watch it like real serial
Raiders as Black and White Serial
Awesome Serial

None of these really bear on the discussion here, however, because gabbagabbahey's notion is one that goes rather beyond the length of the more traditional serial length shown in the Temple of Doom serial there and, presumably, in the Raiders one as well. (However, I've at least been able to delete the latter two of those Raiders serial threads, so thanks for that, at least.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
GabbaGabbaHey's topic is about Indy 5...Yes? No? He is suggesting a different approach so dividing the previously released Indy films into "chapters" has little to do with the subject at hand.

He is suggesting a different approach, but there are certain components of the Indiana Jones films that one would expect to be continued here. I'd also wager that there would be a certain wisdom to this project allowing for the four segments to be re-edited into a single film at a later date. Even without that provision, you'd still want a narrative on this concept to fit in with the prior films. Would we really be happy with an Indy narrative without a longer, slower section wherein we pick up most of the information about the locales, history, and characters? That's the merit of this portion of the discussion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Even though I somewhat agree with this, the "OP"* said that no other "franchise" or "series" besides Indy could pull this off.

Yeah, although I somewhat agree with it too. It could be argued that the suspense is always of a "how will they get out of this?" nature rather than a "will they get out of this?" nature, but for such an unconventional hook as this one might hope for more than that, especially considering the degree to which information about the project would inevitably leak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
*OP: People have NAMES, y'know. Try using them!

Indeed.

And, moving on from the meta-conversation...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
I really like this question. Not sure whether these would be the best places for cliffhangers or not (especially since each "chapter" here is probably not equal in time), but:
Raiders
-Part I ends when Toht enters the Raven bar and threatens Marion with the poker (seems like we ended here, we would need an introduction for Toht's character before this scene, so that his sinister nature would be more fully-fleshed out)
-Part II ends with Marion's evident death and Indiana being brought before Belloq (could seem like less of a cliffhanger and more of a downer ending)
-Part III ends with Indy and Marion trapped in the Well of the Souls (lame, amirite?)
-Part IV ends with the Nazis taking over the Bantu Wind (one of the better ones, I think)
-Part V ends with the warehouse scene, obviously

I'd like to return to this subject when I have a little more time to do so - timing being important - but it's worth throwing in there that gabbagabbahey's concept is one involving four different segments, not five.
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Old 11-02-2011, 07:08 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
GabbaGabbaHey's topic is about Indy 5...Yes? No? He is suggesting a different approach so dividing the previously released Indy films into "chapters" has little to do with the subject at hand.
I was responding to this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Here's a thought experiment: where would you put the divisions in the existing four films for this sort of release model?
And in the part of my post that you did not quote, I tried to outline a few ways that the new film's plot structure would have to differ from the rest of the series. I was questioning how well an Indy film would be able to pull this off. One of my sentences:
Quote:
Originally Posted by me
The more exciting moments in Raiders would not make for good cliffhanger endings simply because that would make them less exciting, I'd think.
...now seems really unhelpful (I need to proofread more often...), but I meant that the "more exciting moments" in the films depend on a build-up with a quick, often humorous resolution. Even the longest action piece in the film, the truck chase scene, would lose its energy if it was divided up. Just now, I imagined the Cairo swordsman scene as a cliffhanger, with the next episode of the serial resolving the situation with Indy simply pulling a gun. I can't help but feel that what makes scenes like this so great would be lost.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Even though I somewhat agree with this, the "OP"* said that no other "franchise" or "series" besides Indy could pull this off.
Indeed he did, but I do not think that is the case. Cliffhangers do not work when nothing is at stake for the hero; consider how none of us really worried for Indy when we saw an atomic bomb dropped on him in KotCS. I think any established film series (television shows, a la Dallas, often seem to somehow get around it) have trouble pulling off effective cliffhangers when they don't inspire genuine fear for the characters' safety. Perhaps I am misunderstanding how a cliffhanger functions, but that anxiety seems integral, to me. (I wasn't alive at the time, so I could be a little off, but I am thinking of Empire Strikes Back as a good example of a film that left you worrying about the heroes' fates.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
*OP: People have NAMES, y'know. Try using them!
Ah, you're just saying that because you like dabbadabbadoo's username.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
I'd also wager that there would be a certain wisdom to this project allowing for the four segments to be re-edited into a single film at a later date. Even without that provision, you'd still want a narrative on this concept to fit in with the prior films. Would we really be happy with an Indy narrative without a longer, slower section wherein we pick up most of the information about the locales, history, and characters? That's the merit of this portion of the discussion.
That is precisely what I was thinking, though I admittedly did not communicate it very well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
...it's worth throwing in there that gabbagabbahey's concept is one involving four different segments, not five.
I know, and I realized that as I was splitting it into five sections. I was just more interested in noting the possible splits than I was in adapting the film to his model. As I was thinking about it, I almost created even more divisions, but that would make each episode even shorter than they would be in gabba's vision, like the serial version of Doom that Stoo linked us to. Indeed, gabba's Indy V would end up being far longer than any of the previous installments.
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Old 11-02-2011, 11:39 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
I know, and I realized that as I was splitting it into five sections. I was just more interested in noting the possible splits than I was in adapting the film to his model. As I was thinking about it, I almost created even more divisions, but that would make each episode even shorter than they would be in gabba's vision, like the serial version of Doom that Stoo linked us to. Indeed, gabba's Indy V would end up being far longer than any of the previous installments.

I think that's fair, but part of the merit of going with four, on an approximately half-hour length model, is that it forces us to deal with the usual Indiana Jones rhythms and materials and how they would fit into this new format. With Raiders being 115 minutes long, Temple being 118, Crusade being 127, and Crystal Skull being 122 minutes, that's roughly the right length. You even have a little leeway, presuming the credits and introductory sequences would be cut for the eventual, and inevitable, consolidation of the segments into a single film. Any shorter than half an hour and I'd wager that whatever realism was in the concept to begin with totally flies out the window.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
...the "more exciting moments" in the films depend on a build-up with a quick, often humorous resolution. Even the longest action piece in the film, the truck chase scene, would lose its energy if it was divided up. Just now, I imagined the Cairo swordsman scene as a cliffhanger, with the next episode of the serial resolving the situation with Indy simply pulling a gun. I can't help but feel that what makes scenes like this so great would be lost.

Yeah, I quite agree. To consider your divisions...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
-Part I ends when Toht enters the Raven bar and threatens Marion with the poker (seems like we ended here, we would need an introduction for Toht's character before this scene, so that his sinister nature would be more fully-fleshed out)
-Part II ends with Marion's evident death and Indiana being brought before Belloq (could seem like less of a cliffhanger and more of a downer ending)
-Part III ends with Indy and Marion trapped in the Well of the Souls (lame, amirite?)
-Part IV ends with the Nazis taking over the Bantu Wind (one of the better ones, I think)
-Part V ends with the warehouse scene, obviously

...partly with this in mind but also towards resolving them in a four-segment direction, here are my thoughts on Raiders, while looking at the film to get the timing right.

Part I ends with Toht threatening Marion with the poker, at approximately 29 minutes.
Part II ends either with Indy and Sallah looking over the Well of Souls and seeing the asps, or with Indy face to face with the cobra, at either 58 minutes or 60 minutes.
Part III ends either with the swastika burning off of the crate or with the appearance of the U-Boat, at either 89 minutes or 90 minutes.
Part IV ends with the end of the film.

(I rather like the idea of "Truck? What truck?" as a cliffhanger, but the timing doesn't work out.)

I frankly enjoy how low-key most of these are, with the exception of Part I or the U-Boat rendition of Part III. Still, Part I is very heavy on conversation and Part III is almost exclusively action. Part IV is a little short. Only Part II is really an ideal balance, I'd wager, encompassing the Raven Bar fight, Sallah's home, the Basket game and Marion's apparent death, Indy and Belloq's scene, the Imam's, and the whole of the map room/digging sequence.

There is the awkwardness of the well-intercut Marion/Belloq and Indy/Sallah material being split across two sequences, but I'm not sure there's any real avoiding that, unless you allow Part II to be a bit longer and have it concluding with Belloq seeing the crate being raised out of the Well of Souls, at minute 66. That would do the rather elegant work of putting a sentient threat at the end of each cliffhanger chapter, rather than the snakes in my rendition above. I'm just not sure whether that elegance is better.

(Is the direction I'm pushing this thread in too much of a diagnostic parlor game? Perhaps. But I find it worthwhile and fun.)
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:19 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
Indeed he did, but I do not think that is the case.
Hey, I agree with you that Indy isn't the only series/franchise to be able to pull this idea off. I was just restating what GabbaGabba wrote.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillKill4Food
Cliffhangers do not work when nothing is at stake for the hero; consider how none of us really worried for Indy when we saw an atomic bomb dropped on him in KotCS. I think any established film series (television shows, a la Dallas, often seem to somehow get around it) have trouble pulling off effective cliffhangers when they don't inspire genuine fear for the characters' safety. Perhaps I am misunderstanding how a cliffhanger functions, but that anxiety seems integral, to me. (I wasn't alive at the time, so I could be a little off, but I am thinking of Empire Strikes Back as a good example of a film that left you worrying about the heroes' fates.)
Cliffhangers work even if there is zero emotional investment in the characters because (like Attila already said) they are not about 'WILL the heroes survive' but, instead, 'HOW will they survive?'. That is their standard function.

Yes, the ending of "Empire" back in 1980 was a cliffhanger with emotional investment, which took the genre to a whole new level. A 3 year wait! (Although, it was the film's major criticism at the time...)

(No one feared for J.R. in "Dallas". Everyone was glad he got shot!)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
It could be argued that the suspense is always of a "how will they get out of this?" nature rather than a "will they get out of this?" nature, but for such an unconventional hook as this one might hope for more than that, especially considering the degree to which information about the project would inevitably leak.
With film pirates being so commonplace now, the new chapters of this proposed idea would be found on the intranetses very soon after their release. Metal detectors and full-body-checks would have to be placed at the entrance of each theatre.
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:25 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
With film pirates being so commonplace now, the new chapters of this proposed idea would be found on the intranetses very soon after their release. Metal detectors and full-body-checks would have to be placed at the entrance of each theatre.

I'm sure I alluded to that, much earlier in this thread.
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:58 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pale Horse
I'm sure I alluded to that, much earlier in this thread.


Since the possibilty exists that a picture may be pirated why are any movies ever released in theaters?

IMO people go to the theater for the total experience. The huge screen, the great sound system, the popcorn (whether they admit it or not), to experience a great film with others (such as a family member, friend or date). It goes way beyond just finding out how the hero escapes or how the picture ends.

After the intial release this would go to streaming, DVD rentals and a boxed set you can buy at WalMart just like any other picture.
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Old 11-03-2011, 04:56 PM   #58
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Piecemeal is harder to isolate and prosecute.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:11 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Cliffhangers work even if there is zero emotional investment in the characters because (like Attila already said) they are not about 'WILL the heroes survive' but, instead, 'HOW will they survive?'. That is their standard function.
That is something I had not really thought through. I think you're right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
(No one feared for J.R. in "Dallas". Everyone was glad he got shot!)
As a support for your first point, most people were more interested in who shot J.R. rather than whether he would survive.
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Old 11-07-2011, 02:04 AM   #60
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Some more fun with diagnostics...

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, as we know it, is 114 minutes long. Considering that there's credits involved in that, it's about 108 minutes of film footage. (I don't understand why the earlier figure I'd found cited 118 minutes.)

Part I would end at about 27 minutes, with Indy and Shorty's conversation about Sankara and fortune and glory.
Part II would end at about 57 minutes, with Indy, Shorty, and Willie having just escaped the spike room.
Part III would end at 84 minutes, with "Right. All of us."
Part IV would end at 108 minutes, with Indy and Willie embracing.

Part I would have 27 minutes, Part II would have 30, Part III would have 27, and Part IV would have 24 minutes (and, perversely, about 7 different action beats.)

You might be able to push Part II back a little to be during the spike scene, or
forward a little to get to the first site of the altar to Kali. They're all choices that make some sense, but I'm finding myself favoring a methodology that doesn't slice action sequences into bits. If others were coming forward with their sketches of how it might work (I kid, Stoo, I kid!), we could have something to talk about. Incidentally, while it's entirely apart from what gabbagabbahey initially suggested, I suspect that a more action-oriented approach might be one that sliced the films into segments closer to being 20 minutes in length rather than 30. That's also the length at which Temple's single best "where do we go from here?" moment gets to be a segment end, which is to say, the close-up on Indy's newly evil face at 74 minutes.

* * *

Last Crusade is 125 minutes long. Adjusting for 6 minutes of credits, that's 119 minutes of material. As such, the segments should each be almost exactly half an hour long.

Oddly, it also seems to be the film where a straightforward cliffhanger approach seems most natural, dictated both by placement and by the one literal cliffhanger moment where Indy's death seems a certainty. That's at 95 minutes, meaning the final segment of the film will be shorter, and the ones prior have a little more leeway to play around in.

So:

Part I could end at 35 minutes and the dropping of the match as the rats begin to run down the catacombs. That makes this the longest segment, which isn't bad, since it is broken into 3 discrete segments, plus the smaller Coronado scene.
Part II could end at 66 minutes with the pan up to Berlin on the road sign. It's less actiony, but if you hold for the first glimpses of the burning books, it would have potential.
Part III, as before, could end at 95 minutes, as Indy sees the edge of the cliff.
Part IV ends at 119 minutes, as they ride off into the sunset.

Part I is 35 minutes long, Part II is 31 minutes, Part III is 29, and Part IV is 24.

* * *

Then, Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is 120 minutes long, with 5 of those being credits, leaving us with 115 minutes to divide up.

Doomtown is rather prior to the point of being a possible cliffhanger in a four-segment structure. This suggests that an attractive approach to the divisions in this particular film is one that tries to find the moodier, more foreboding moments and puts a division there.

Part I ends at 27 minutes, as Indy boards the train that will presumably take him to his new life.
Part II ends at 56 minutes, with Indy and Mutt at gunpoint upon emerging from the cemetery.
Part III ends at 90 minutes, with Indy's "Because it told me to." (As an aside, the exchange that happens after the waterfalls is much better than the preceding material would suggest.)
Part IV ends at 115 minutes, with the wedding guests, followed by a hat-less Mutt, leaving the chapel.

Part I is 27 minutes long, Part II is 29, Part III is 34, and Part IV is 25.

* * *

Now, I'm not a serials guy. I'm not versed in them, and I've barely seen any of them. This means that I don't have a great sense of where exactly the divisions are usually placed. Are they when danger begins? Are they at the tensest point in the action? Are they at the point right where the way out is revealed? Or just before that point?

The other question: is the placement of segment divisions in the old serial manner one that would really shift properly into this new idea in this new age. While action based cliffhangers could be a little hard to make work in a more modern era, particularly with regards to the reveal of the precise solutions that would come into play, I fear that some of my moodier transitions feel more akin to where episode breaks come in the long-form television dramas of today.
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Old 11-07-2011, 07:19 AM   #61
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Indy as a cartoon before the feature lends itself to the format best.
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Old 11-07-2011, 02:02 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket Surgeon
Indy as a cartoon before the feature lends itself to the format best.

You should bold that "before" there, otherwise some parties might feel encouraged into thinking you meant "during."
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Old 11-07-2011, 09:55 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by gabbagabbahey
Well, yes & no. Yes, because it would be radically different because as far as I know nobody has tried this before with a major release, but no because it would be based on the classic pulp formula.

They shoot the whole thing at once, but break it down into four, one hour "mini movies", then, release them one week apart in chronological order. Of course, each "episode" leaves you hanging so you come back & watch the next one to see what happens. Because in the end you have a 4 hour long movie they could pretty much pull out all the stops for the final Indiana Jones release.

The movies would have special admission pricing, say, $4.99, so that you don't turn people off too much because they have to keep coming back to see what happens. In the end though, the producers/theaters are bringing in $20 for the release instead of the usual $8 (or whatever).

Is it a risk? Hell yeah. Could it work? Hell yeah. Sometimes you have to think outside the box & blaze some trails. If any series could pull it off it would be the Indy series, which was practically born to be released this way.

Remember, you heard it hear first. : )

Thoughts?


So you want people to invest 4 trips to the theater (in successive weeks) at $20 a pop for a single 4-hour film? Uh, no. First, it's insane to expect people to keep coming back each week. Most people have lives, and those lives don't involve hanging out at the local theater each week. If I miss week 2, why would I even care about weeks 3-4? Second, $20 tickets for a single film (assuming people see all 4) reeks of corporate greed rather than brilliance. Finally, I wouldn't invest 1 trip to the theater and $12 for a ticket to see anything from the Lucas/Spielberg camp after what they did with Indy IV. Lots of other people wouldn't either. This idea is a bomb.

Go back and research serials of the 40s and 50s. They weren't what you paid to see, they were marketing devices to keep people paying to see the features. Combining them into a single film would seem stilted and slightly schizophrenic.
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Old 11-07-2011, 11:42 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HovitosKing
I wouldn't invest 1 trip to the theater and $12 for a ticket to see anything from the Lucas/Spielberg camp after what they did with Indy IV. Lots of other people wouldn't either. This idea is a bomb.

This pretty much says everything we need to know about where your head is at. Don't like it? Don't go.

A few people liked this enough to spend a couple of bucks on it.

"In February 2010 it was the 25th highest-grossing film of all time domestically, and 35th highest-grossing worldwide, as well as the most financially successful Indiana Jones film when not adjusted for inflation of ticket prices."

Hardly the bomb you are trying to make it ouot to be. I suspect the public would be interested in Indy 5 whether it was a serial or conventional release.

Last edited by gabbagabbahey : 11-07-2011 at 11:51 PM.
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:20 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Incidentally, while it's entirely apart from what gabbagabbahey initially suggested, I suspect that a more action-oriented approach might be one that sliced the films into segments closer to being 20 minutes in length rather than 30.
That's what I've been saying all along. 15 -20 minutes!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Now, I'm not a serials guy. I'm not versed in them, and I've barely seen any of them. This means that I don't have a great sense of where exactly the divisions are usually placed. Are they when danger begins? Are they at the tensest point in the action? Are they at the point right where the way out is revealed? Or just before that point?
Attila, it saddens me to discover that you're ignorant of this. (How can you NOT know???) In the classic cliffhangers, the break comes right at the point where the hero is about to DIE!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
The other question: is the placement of segment divisions in the old serial manner one that would really shift properly into this new idea in this new age. While action based cliffhangers could be a little hard to make work in a more modern era, particularly with regards to the reveal of the precise solutions that would come into play, I fear that some of my moodier transitions feel more akin to where episode breaks come in the long-form television dramas of today.
Yes, your ideas are very in line with contemporary TV but that doesn't make it wrong...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hovitos King
Go back and research serials of the 40s and 50s. They weren't what you paid to see, they were marketing devices to keep people paying to see the features.
Erm...Hovitos, you are the one who needs to "go back" and do YOUR OWN RESEARCH. Serials of the *'50s* being marketing devices? You obviously have no idea what you're talking about...

Gabbagabbahey's suggestion is not STRICTLY BASED on previous output but, instead, INSPIRED by it. Yes? No?
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:36 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by Stoo
That's what I've been saying all along. 15 -20 minutes!
Attila, it saddens me to discover that you're ignorant of this. (How can you NOT know???) In the classic cliffhangers, the break comes right at the point where the hero is about to DIE!!!

During my short and recent education into this fascinating subject, I've noticed a trend where the first episode of a serial can be between 25-30 minutes long, while all the following instalments are between 15-18 minutes. The first one is designed to impart more of the background and story. That may influence the way the Indy movies are broken up.
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Old 11-08-2011, 04:33 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo
Attila, it saddens me to discover that you're ignorant of this. (How can you NOT know???) In the classic cliffhangers, the break comes right at the point where the hero is about to DIE!!!

Well, that certainly is the received wisdom. But I wasn't sure if that was a hard-and-fast rule, or whether there were occasions when the cliffhanger was more along the lines of: "how is he going to deal with this new threat?" or "now that that's done with, what's next?"
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Old 12-04-2011, 12:33 AM   #68
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So, I've been watching Republic's King of the Rocket Men today, and a new thought arises.

Is there any real way to make the recaps of the prior chapter(s) at the beginning of the segments after the first not feel:

A) like a "Previously on Indiana Jones" television opening?
OR
B) campy as all get out?
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Old 12-04-2011, 04:14 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Is there any real way to make the recaps of the prior chapter(s) at the beginning of the segments after the first not feel:

A) like a "Previously on Indiana Jones" television opening?
OR
B) campy as all get out?
One could have new footage replaying some of the more crucial events from a different character's perspective, reminding the audience of what happened in the last 'episode' while also revealing some new detail (which might be particularly effective for serial-style cliffhangers), or just not have a visual recap at all and write the dialogue so that it fills in the gaps between chapters. The second option would not work so well for most cliffhangers, but it could work for less dire cliffhangers or, conversely, those more extreme ones where the fate of a character is all but sealed (which is how Rossio and Elliot handled the segue from Pirates of the Caribbean II to III, if you're familiar with that).
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Old 12-04-2011, 12:57 PM   #70
Montana Smith
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The recaps do sometimes change. They intercut new footage showing what had been held back on the first viewing. So while the original might show the hero bound in a burning building, and then the building exploding, the recap might show a colleague entering the building to perform the rescue.

In the original serials when you realize that not all the recaps are simply repeated footage, it makes you pay more attention and your finger off the fast forward button!
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Old 03-01-2012, 11:57 PM   #71
gabbagabbahey
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I've thought about this a bit more & have a couple wrinkles I'd like to run by the gang.

Instead of breaking it up into 4 seperate movies released 4 weeks apart how about a single 3 hour movie that is broken down into either 3 1 hour segments/episodes or 4 45 minute segments/episodes? Each ends and begins like the classic seriels complete w/a few faux trailers for other action type movies (similar to what they did in "Grindhouse") run in between each segment.

Instead of a ticket price of $8.50 they could go to $10 or $12 Make one of the segments in 3D (let's have some fun w/the new technology) & what the hell, try & figure out some way to add a few other "fun" features. Remember "Odorama" w/the scratch & sniff cards? "The Tingler"? Remember guys, we're not talking about high art here, we're talking about having fun & being entertained for a few hours. Thoughts?
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