TheRaider.net
 

Go Back   The Raven > The Films > Indiana Jones Trilogy
User Name
Password

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-24-2007, 12:41 PM   #1
herr gruber
Guest
 
herr gruber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: 29c Bowler Hat Lane, Brollyville, U.K.
Posts: 1,192
What is your single LEAST favourite scene from the trilogy?

I know this is gonna be a popular answer. Speedboats... However, my prize goes to the Young Indy sequence in LC. Tiresome explanation of the character that wasn't necessary. (IMO)
herr gruber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2007, 12:49 PM   #2
oki9Sedo
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,181
Quote:
Originally Posted by herr gruber
I know this is gonna be a popular answer. Speedboats... However, my prize goes to the Young Indy sequence in LC. Tiresome explanation of the character that wasn't necessary. (IMO)

The speedboat chase in Last Crusade.

http://www.theraider.net/showimage.p...nshots/143.jpg

Gotta love those steel masts, aerials and warehouses, they're so conveyant of 1938 Venice, and not 1988 London docks. Awful location scouting, just awful.
oki9Sedo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2007, 10:17 PM   #3
Indy's Sidekick
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 17
Ick factor

The dining scene from doom. That was just gross. I mean, come on! Those were supposed to be relatively normal people there. Snakes and beatles and brains, oh my.
Indy's Sidekick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2007, 10:45 PM   #4
No Ticket
IndyFan
 
No Ticket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South America, 1936
Posts: 2,447
I never liked (when I was a kid) the scene with Indy and Marion on the ship (the kisses and stuff)...

but now that i'm grown up I like pretty much all the scenes. lol.
No Ticket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 12:52 AM   #5
Little Indy
IndyFan
 
Little Indy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 543
The opening sequence in TOD with Willie singing. If they had kept it with her in the club itself it would have been fine. But I just can't stand the dancing girls inside the dragons's mouth and that big red cloth Willie brings out. Just seems a little odd in my book.
Little Indy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 01:13 AM   #6
Kingsley
IndyFan
 
Kingsley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Argentina
Posts: 979
I don't like all the Thugees temple stuff. I know it's not just a scene, it's about 30 minutes between the discovery of the cult and the mine chase scene
Kingsley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 01:30 AM   #7
ResidentAlien
Guest
 
ResidentAlien's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,303
Just one? How about all of Last Crusade? A blunder straight through. Though I must agree that the Young Indy scene is particularly awful and for exactly the same reason that was already stated. You kill the myth of the character by introducing all this back-story. He's no longer a mysterious figure but instead has a past rooted in reality. Same problem with introducing his father. Ugh.
ResidentAlien is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 03:49 AM   #8
Attila the Professor
Moderator
 
Attila the Professor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 6,394
I hate to be one of those types, but what really springs to mind is that borderline offensive invented exoticism of the Pankot Palace dinner sequence. I like the dialogue just fine - that stuff's classic - but the trappings are too much.
Attila the Professor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 03:01 PM   #9
Kingsley
IndyFan
 
Kingsley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Argentina
Posts: 979
Quote:
Originally Posted by ResidentAlien
Just one? How about all of Last Crusade?
What I like about TOD and LC is that they generate richer opinions in people than the unanimous Raiders.

Another opinion about LC
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade: A Narrative Form Case-study
Kingsley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 05:34 PM   #10
oki9Sedo
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingsley
What I like about TOD and LC is that they generate richer opinions in people than the unanimous Raiders.

True.

Raiders has always been my personal favourite for all the obvious reasons.

Interestingly, when you think about it, Temple is the most child-friendly. Yes, it has child slavery, but none of the children are seriously hurt and they all arrive home alive and healthy at the end, laughing and hugging their parents with the Raiders March playing. Its got a child sidekick, more slapstick and goofball humour than the others, and the most straightforward story, and none of the more adult ideas in the other two.

I think the interesting thing about Crusade is its the most well-rounded film. It has a little of everything - action, adventure, comedy, character drama, romance, history etc.
oki9Sedo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 07:46 PM   #11
Bjorn Heimdall
IndyFan
 
Bjorn Heimdall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Iceland
Posts: 283
I think for me it's the transformation of Indy after drinking the blood in ToD. Even with rich supernatural elements in all movies the whole "drinking blood and becoming bad" thing just never clicked with me.
Bjorn Heimdall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 09:00 PM   #12
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,555
Donovan's study in Last Crusade -- heavy-handed exposition, soap-opera quality set, clumsy movement -- and it's boring.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 09:39 PM   #13
Attila the Professor
Moderator
 
Attila the Professor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 6,394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Brody
Donovan's study in Last Crusade -- heavy-handed exposition, soap-opera quality set, clumsy movement -- and it's boring.

Heh, just goes to show how warped I am...that somehow stands as a scene I count among my favorites. (This is probably tied into how quotable it is, for a certain type of quoter.)
Attila the Professor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 09:50 PM   #14
Joe Brody
IndyFan
 
Joe Brody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sweetest Place on Earth
Posts: 2,555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Heh, just goes to show how warped I am...that somehow stands as a scene I count among my favorites. (This is probably tied into how quotable it is, for a certain type of quoter.)


I think the Donovan character gets stronger as the film goes on -- but there's nothing (tension or otherwise) between Indy and Donovan in that scene. There's some good dialogue -- but that's it.

Plus, think back to our discussion on the motorcyle chase -- I'm a slave to the visuals.
Joe Brody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 09:57 PM   #15
Attila the Professor
Moderator
 
Attila the Professor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 6,394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Brody
I think the Donovan character gets stronger as the film goes on -- but there's nothing (tension or otherwise) between Indy and Donovan in that scene. There's some good dialogue -- but that's it.

Plus, think back to our discussion on the motorcyle chase -- I'm a slave to the visuals.

This is true. As an actor, I'm a dialogue man, through and through.

Although, I'll offer up some defense: Donovan, the benign art collector, ought to be a bit of a milquetoast, so as to make the revelation of his true colors so much more out of left field. He seems like a man who would have engaging cocktail parties in his elegant penthouse, perhaps like a man who "would sell his mother for an Estruscan vase" (one gets the feeling that Walter neglects his guests on a regular basis), but not at all one who "would sell his country and his soul to the slime of humanity." Even the line that is called back to, about not trusting anyone, really doesn't telegraph anything at the time. The even kept him off of the poster, except for a small image of him standing on the sideboard of the one car. It's all to justify that rumble of thunder, really.
Attila the Professor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 10:20 PM   #16
No Ticket
IndyFan
 
No Ticket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South America, 1936
Posts: 2,447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
This is true. As an actor, I'm a dialogue man, through and through.

Although, I'll offer up some defense: Donovan, the benign art collector, ought to be a bit of a milquetoast, so as to make the revelation of his true colors so much more out of left field. He seems like a man who would have engaging cocktail parties in his elegant penthouse, perhaps like a man who "would sell his mother for an Estruscan vase" (one gets the feeling that Walter neglects his guests on a regular basis), but not at all one who "would sell his country and his soul to the slime of humanity." Even the line that is called back to, about not trusting anyone, really doesn't telegraph anything at the time. The even kept him off of the poster, except for a small image of him standing on the sideboard of the one car. It's all to justify that rumble of thunder, really.

I agree, why would there be tension when Indy has no reason to doubt what he is saying... it has to be a complete surprise to both Indy and the audience. I did like the dialogue between the two. Indy if anything, is bored with his discussion in the first place... he doesn't really have interest in this, until he finds out about his father.

This scene never really bothered me. I think it's only more boring now if you've seen it quite a number of times. "You've got the wrong Jones..." "Try my father."

"We already have. Your father's the one who's gone missing."

Something along those lines.
No Ticket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 11:16 PM   #17
deckard24
IndyFan
 
deckard24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by ResidentAlien
Just one? How about all of Last Crusade? A blunder straight through. Though I must agree that the Young Indy scene is particularly awful and for exactly the same reason that was already stated. You kill the myth of the character by introducing all this back-story. He's no longer a mysterious figure but instead has a past rooted in reality. Same problem with introducing his father. Ugh.

As entertaining as LC can be at times, this is spot on!

The young Indy stuff is awful in my book. I didn't like as a kid when I saw it the first time in the theater, and I still feel the same way!
deckard24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2007, 11:30 PM   #18
ResidentAlien
Guest
 
ResidentAlien's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,303
Quote:
Originally Posted by deckard24
As entertaining as LC can be at times, this is spot on!

The young Indy stuff is awful in my book. I didn't like as a kid when I saw it the first time in the theater, and I still feel the same way!

See, the irony is... I like Young Indy the series. I just forget that it's the same character. You know? I just divorce myself of its lineage. I hate what it does in terms of Indy's mystique, but I don't mind the show on its own terms.
ResidentAlien is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 12:03 AM   #19
No Ticket
IndyFan
 
No Ticket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South America, 1936
Posts: 2,447
I imagine they explained his past in LC because they assumed that would be the last one and the last chance to do so. I agree and never really thought about it in that way. It does destroy some of those "where did he come from" questions. But I still really like LC and I think it is the most quotable of all of them actually.
No Ticket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 05:50 AM   #20
Billy Ray
IndyFan
 
Billy Ray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,606
I realize this isn't exactly a scene (though it applies to pretty much every scene he is in), but my least favorite part of the trilogy is the transformation of Marcus Brody into a bumbling bufoon in TLC. In Raiders he comes across as almost a mentor to Indy, claiming that if he were younger he owuld go after the Ark. There is a sense that in his youger days he was much the same sort of adventurer as Indy. In TLC he is downgraded to comic relief.
Billy Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 09:57 AM   #21
deckard24
IndyFan
 
deckard24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy Ray
I realize this isn't exactly a scene (though it applies to pretty much every scene he is in), but my least favorite part of the trilogy is the transformation of Marcus Brody into a bumbling bufoon in TLC. In Raiders he comes across as almost a mentor to Indy, claiming that if he were younger he owuld go after the Ark. There is a sense that in his youger days he was much the same sort of adventurer as Indy. In TLC he is downgraded to comic relief.

Billy Ray, I agree completely! This is exactly why I take issue with LC! Waaayyy too much slapstick! It really seems like Spielberg (feeling guilty for ToD) deliberately made LC lighter to make up for it.

Resident Alien, I see what you are saying, and where the young Young Indy segments are concerned I could divorce myself as well from the lineage. But... as soon as Sean Patrick Flannery took over, my interest in the series dissipated. There was nothing about SPF's young Indy that convinced me in a few short years he would become HF's Indy. That for me was too big a pill to be asked to swallow. I can suspend my disbelief only so far.
deckard24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 10:13 AM   #22
QBComics
IndyFan
 
QBComics's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by deckard24
Billy Ray, I agree completely! This is exactly why I take issue with LC! Waaayyy too much slapstick! It really seems like Spielberg (feeling guilty for ToD) deliberately made LC lighter to make up for it.

Resident Alien, I see what you are saying, and where the young Young Indy segments are concerned I could divorce myself as well from the lineage. But... as soon as Sean Patrick Flannery took over, my interest in the series dissipated. There was nothing about SPF's young Indy that convinced me in a few short years he would become HF's Indy. That for me was too big a pill to be asked to swallow. I can suspend my disbelief only so far.

I agree with both of you as well.
QBComics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 10:48 AM   #23
Sankara
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Germany
Posts: 904
I guess Spielberg and Lucas would agree with me that the worst Indy-Scene is the "boat-out-off-plane-jump" in "Temple". This is a little bit to much. It's over the top-action. Indy in action means REAL stunts like in "Raiders" and "Crusade".

I'm very happy that they do real stunts in "Indy IV" too.


But don't get me wrong. As you all know I love ALL Indiana Jones-Movies like no other.
Sankara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 11:11 AM   #24
oki9Sedo
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sankara
I guess Spielberg and Lucas would agree with me that the worst Indy-Scene is the "boat-out-off-plane-jump" in "Temple". This is a little bit to much. It's over the top-action.

Do Lucas and Spielberg dislike that scene? I absolutely love it.

Last edited by oki9Sedo : 12-28-2007 at 11:33 AM.
oki9Sedo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2007, 11:41 AM   #25
oki9Sedo
IndyFan
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,181
Quote:
Originally Posted by No Ticket
I agree, why would there be tension when Indy has no reason to doubt what he is saying... it has to be a complete surprise to both Indy and the audience. I did like the dialogue between the two. Indy if anything, is bored with his discussion in the first place... he doesn't really have interest in this, until he finds out about his father.

This scene never really bothered me. I think it's only more boring now if you've seen it quite a number of times. "You've got the wrong Jones..." "Try my father."

"We already have. Your father's the one who's gone missing."

Something along those lines.

I never had a problem with that scene......its a good, well directed, well performed, well scripted exposition scene with nothing particularly special in it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attila the Professor
Even the line that is called back to, about not trusting anyone, really doesn't telegraph anything at the time.

I know, its remarkable how that line didn't telegraph his villainy and a credit to Spielberg's direction and Glover's performance. Its an unwritten rule that whenever that line is said that means they're the villain.
oki9Sedo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:45 PM.